OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

OSU announces formation of major new board of advisers

12/07/1999

CORVALLIS - Oregon State University announced Tuesday the formation of a new Board of Advisors that will guide the university in strategic decisions and review OSU's annual budget.

The 14-member board, comprised of regional and national leaders in business, education, natural resources, government and journalism, was approved by Oregon University System Chancellor Joe Cox. The board will meet for the first time later this winter.

"This is an outstanding group of leaders who will become an important part of everything we do at Oregon State University," said OSU President Paul Risser. "They bring a wealth of experience, a broad range of perspectives, and a record of sound judgment. The university is growing rapidly in many directions and beginning numerous new partnerships.

"The strategic guidance of the OSU Board of Advisors will be invaluable," Risser added. Members of the board include:

  • Gail Achterman, a partner in Stoel Rives LLP, Portland;
  • Neil Bryant, attorney and state senator, Bend;
  • Robert C. Buchanan, former director of the Oregon Economic Development, Milton-Freewater;
  • Sue Densmore, owner of Densmore Communication Strategies, Medford;
  • Larry M. Giustina, general partner, Giustina Land & Timber, Eugene;
  • Gloria Gostnell, retired principal, Irvington School, Portland;
  • Lesley M. Hallick, vice president for academic affairs and provost, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland;
  • Judith Hofer, president and CEO of Filene's, Boston, Mass;
  • William W. Krippaehne Jr., president and CEO of Fisher Companies, Inc., Seattle, Wash.;
  • Keith McKennon, chairman of the board and CEO of PacifiCorp, Portland;
  • Jerome C. Meyer, chairman and CEO of Tektronix, Wilsonville;
  • Clara Padilla-Andrews, editor and publisher of El Hispanic News, Portland;
  • Andrew V. Smith, retired executive vice president, U.S. West, Inc., Bellevue, Wash.;
  • Mike Thorne, executive director, Port of Portland, Portland.

The formation of an advisory board for OSU is an outgrowth of nearly two years of conversations and planning between the Oregon University System, the State Board of Higher Education, and the leadership of the universities within the OUS.

"I think the group of people that Oregon State University has put together is really outstanding," said Tom Imeson, president of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education. "Public higher education in Oregon is moving into a new era with its budget model that will require some new thinking. Having outside resources to guide the university fits perfectly with the plan that the state board had in mind.

"I'm extremely enthusiastic about the group of people that Paul Risser and OSU have put together," Imeson added.

Risser said the advisory board will analyze and make recommendations on major strategic decisions for the university, including an annual review of the budget.

The board also will provide guidance and leadership for strategic direction of OSU, Risser said. Among the issues that will be examined are the scope and focus of OSU programs in the Portland area; the balance of skills needed by graduating students; support of scholarship and creativity in the arts, humanities and social sciences; the development of strategies to empower individual employees so their ideas and initiatives can be identified and implemented; the role of the OSU Extension Service and its county offices; and the development of new partnerships with the private sector.

"Oregon State University is an institution poised for greatness," Risser said. "We've come through a remarkable three or four years, characterized by unprecedented enrollment growth, a return to financial stability, the adoption of our OSU Statewide education program, and a major effort to create and sustain new partnerships with the private sector, state and federal agencies, other universities and key individuals.

"But we cannot rest on our laurels," he added. "To capitalize on new-found opportunities, we will be required to take calculated risks in making important and timely decisions. The counsel of this extraordinary group of people will be critical."

Campus reaction to the formation of the board has been positive, said Tim White, interim provost and executive vice president.

"Great universities often benefit by such boards to help build capacity and opportunity for academic programs," said White, who has been dean of the OSU College of Health and Human Performance. "The deans and other academic leaders on campus are very supportive and encouraged by this development."

 

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