OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Changing standards of truth, evidence focus of OSU colloquium

01/30/1997

CORVALLIS - The nature of truth and the changing standards of evidence in the courtrooms of the United States and elsewhere is the focus of a colloquium on Feb. 7 at Oregon State University.

The free public event will run from 1 to 5 p.m. in Memorial Union Room 206. It is part of the university's year-long program of presentations revolving around the theme, "What We Know to be True: Argument and Evidence."

Speaking at the colloquium will be a number of historians, philosophers and other scholars specializing in criminal justice and law, jury selection and the history of crime.

"The aim of the colloquium is to stimulate reflection on the way evidence has been evaluated in the law and courtroom proceedings at different times and places," said Robert Nye, a professor of history and Horning Professor of Humanities at OSU.

Presenters include:

-James Mohr, professor and chair of the Department of History at University of Oregon, who will present a paper entitled "Evidence of Insanity and the Law of Will Cases in 19th Century America."

-Randall McGowen, an associate professor of history at the University of Oregon, who will present a paper entitled "Knowing the Hand: Forgery and the Question of Evidence in 18th Century England."

-Angus McLaren, a professor of history at the University of Victoria (B.C.), and a recognized scholar on legal and medical history, who will present "Laughing the Evidence out of Court: The Policing of Gender in the Late 19th Century."

Three OSU scholars will comment on the papers and lead a discussion with the audience after the presentations. They are Kathleen Moore, professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy; Irwin Horowitz, professor of philosophy; and Nye.