Category » Vitality

April 24, 2009

Sensors for Safety

Microbiologists aim for rapid, accurate monitoring of food and water

The news grabbed national headlines in early 2009: eight dead, hundreds sickened by food poisoning in 34 states. After investigators traced the outbreak to Salmonella-tainted peanut butter from a Georgia plant, stores pulled thousands of products from their shelves. Worried consumers tossed suspect items into the trash. At least 100 companies will post losses from […]


February 24, 2009

Resilience

Three times a week, as dawn breaks over the Willamette Valley, 25 women show up at the Benton Center gym in Corvallis.


February 24, 2009

Targeting an Old Foe

Medicine for the new war on tuberculosis

M. tuberculosis is a tenacious germ. Armored in a thick, waxy wall impervious to water, the bacterium can lie dormant in the lungs for decades, waiting for a weakness in its human host.


Lunging for Life
January 23, 2009

Lunging for Life

Next year, a class for 90-year-olds

The risk of falling rises as we get older, but researchers and fitness instructors have a prescription: Better Bones and Balance. Even if you’re 88 years old, there’s a class for you.


Movie maker
September 11, 2008

Movie maker

Zebrafish star in amazing tale

Kate Saili’s films won’t show in theaters any time soon, but they do feature zebrafish, a rising star in molecular biology, in a dramatic role — regenerating tissues that have been injured. Saili, who grew up in Kalispell, Montana, studies the effect of nanomaterials on inflammation. She uses transgenic zebrafish whose white blood cells fluoresce […]


Student goes for gold
September 11, 2008

Student goes for gold

How do gold-based nanoparticles behave in the body?

Nanomaterials are on the health-care horizon. Gold-based materials have long been used to reduce inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis and to improve biomedical imaging. They have intrigued Lisa Truong since she first heard about their potential to help solve intractable problems from cancer to heart disease. Truong, who grew up in the Seattle area, wants […]


Birth Mothers
July 19, 2008

Birth Mothers

Anthropologist leads study with Oregon midwives

“Would you like to help us listen to the baby?” Melissa Cheyney asks 8-year-old Isaiah. “OK, push that button!” As Isaiah carefully holds an ultrasound device against the pregnant belly of his mother, Amanda Wise, ocean-like sounds fill the bright, freshly painted living room. The eyes of Isaiah and his younger sisters and brother widen, […]


Building the Pauling Legacy
January 23, 2008

Building the Pauling Legacy

Oregon native Linus Pauling had already won two Nobel prizes when he turned his genius to the chemical complexities of diet and health. Not content to rest on his laurels as a world-renowned chemist and international peace activist, Pauling plunged with characteristic ardor into the study of micronutrients, particularly vitamin C, in the late 1960s. […]


January 23, 2008

First Line of Defense

Last fall’s announcement that virulent antibiotic-resistant staph infections had killed almost 19,000 patients in American hospitals and nursing homes in 2005 didn’t surprise George Allen. With colleagues David Bearden and Mark Christensen, the assistant professor in the OSU College of Pharmacy studies antibiotic effectiveness. He focuses on a class of broad-spectrum antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones, […]


A Drink to Your (Bone?) Health
January 23, 2008

A Drink to Your (Bone?) Health

Moderate alcohol consumption in adults can have health benefits. It can reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, gallstones and maybe diabetes. Russell Turner, Gianni Maddalozzo and Urszula Iwaniec of OSU’s Bone Research Laboratory could add osteoporosis to that list. Studies with animals have found that the equivalent of five to 10 drinks per week […]


Caring for the Caregivers
July 23, 2007

Caring for the Caregivers

The typical middle-aged woman takes care of everybody in her household except one — herself. The consequences of this benevolent self-neglect can be dire: chronic disease, even death. Even the healthiest lifestyle can’t always prevent disease. Still, millions of wives, mothers and grandmothers could better fend off, or at least slow down, the ravages of […]


Vital Signs
July 23, 2007

Vital Signs

In late April, lush vegetation hems the Coquille Valley in hues of emerald and chartreuse and the forest-greens of Douglas fir. The fertile earth, alive with new growth, suggests vitality and prosperity. On Main Street, the truth is more complicated than that. Like so many rural Oregon communities, the small towns snuggled against timbered hills […]


Energy Source
July 22, 2007

Energy Source

Nutrition and exercise feed healthy habits

The mixed messages blare at every grocery checkout: supermodels smiling seductively from magazines that push chocolate-cake recipes and weight-loss tips on the same page. No wonder millions of American females struggle with food and body image, laments OSU Professor Melinda Manore. The health of women across the age and activity spectrums — from teenage Olympic […]


April 1, 2007

Minding the Dairy

Scientists reveal a killer’s M.O.

Little matters more to dairy farmers than the purity of their product and the health of their animals. So when Warren “Buzz” Gibson, co-owner and herd manager at the Lochmead Dairy in Junction City, Oregon, heard six years ago that an incurable cattle disease called Johne’s (pronounced “yo-knees”) could threaten his reputation for quality, he […]


April 1, 2007

Paratuberculosis (MAP) and a host cell


February 1, 2007

Are We There Yet?

The Twisting Road To Adulthood

By Richard A. Settersten, Jr., professor of Human Development and Family Sciences, member of the MacArthur Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood and Public Policy. “A 30-year-old single mother from Iowa laughed when asked whether she considered herself an adult: ‘I don’t know if I’m an adult yet. I still don’t feel quite grown up. […]


February 1, 2007

Communication Breakdown

Cell signaling key to healthy arteries

Hardening of the arteries and high blood pressure may result from a breakdown in cell communications, researchers in OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute have discovered. The finding could pave the way for new dietary measures and pharmaceuticals to reduce cardiovascular diseases. “It’s also a key to understanding the biological effects of inflammation, which increasingly seems to […]


February 1, 2007

Aptitude For Aging

“As individuals age, they become increasingly like themselves.” Bernice Neugarten, 1964 (founder of the field of personality and aging) In 2006, the first wave of baby boomers turned 60. Even for the bold cultural warriors of the 1960s — the rockers, idealists, protesters and iconoclasts who transformed the nation — the transition to retirement is […]


July 23, 2006

New Life from Black Water

Forget about clear, pristine waters. The real action for some scientists is in dark swamps where black stained water has the acidity of vinegar.


July 23, 2006

Genome Explorer

Larry Wilhelm knows computers, but they weren’t his first love.


To Conquer Vitamin E
July 23, 2006

To Conquer Vitamin E

Trekking through the last frontier of vitamin exploration

Taking a vitamin E supplement? There’s more to it than just popping a pill. Maret Traber of OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute is revealing E’s secrets, including its cozy partnerships with vitamin C and fat.


April 23, 2006

LPI Researchers Take Aim at Lou Gehrig’s Disease

How did Oregon State University’s Linus Pauling Institute become home to groundbreaking research on nerve cell degeneration?


April 23, 2006

Sexual Health: Asking the Tough Questions

Using the research tools of social science — questionnaires, focus groups, interviews and data analysis — Marie Harvey, chair of OSU’s Department of Public Health, delves into the most private of human behaviors and the attitudes that shape them.