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Margaret Burnett
May 13, 2015

Margaret Burnett

Professor of Computer Science, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

When Margaret Burnett was growing up in the 1960s, being a female with a gift for math led to one likely career: teaching. She didn’t see herself in front of a classroom, but when a neighbor got a job with IBM after majoring in math in college, Burnett saw an opportunity. As an undergraduate at […]


Lisa Gaines
May 13, 2015

Lisa Gaines

Director, Institute for Natural Resources

Lisa Gaines’ grandmother made it a priority to educate her girls. “I will educate my daughters before I educate my sons,” Gaines remembers her saying. Gaines’ grandmother lived her entire life in the black community in St. Louis and saw that young men “always found a way of making it through, but women did not.” […]


Julie Greenwood
May 13, 2015

Julie Greenwood

Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs, College of Science

A video in Julie Greenwood’s lab catches cancer cells in the act of invading the brain. They are glioblastoma cells, agents of the same disease that killed Senator Ted Kennedy. “Glioblastoma cells are very effective at invading the neighboring tissue of the brain,” says Greenwood. “In many cases, these cells sprint.” Although surgery is often […]


Catalina Segura
May 13, 2015

Catalina Segura

Assistant Professor, College of Forestry

As the daughter of a physics professor and a lawyer, Catalina Segura set her sites on working in a university. Her father was “truly excited to use science to make a difference,” she recalls. “He was very inspiring.” But growing up in Bogotá, Colombia, which ranks among the world’s 25 largest cities, Segura turned her […]


Holly Swisher
May 13, 2015

Holly Swisher

Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics

In her first year in college (Pacific Lutheran in Tacoma), music almost won out over mathematics for Holly Swisher’s attention. During her high school years in Salem, she had played piano and bassoon in a youth symphony, sang in a choir and even played drums in the marching band. But her love of math wouldn’t […]


Undersea Gliders Think Like a Fish
May 12, 2015

Undersea Gliders Think Like a Fish

Sensors will shed light on ocean ecology

  BY EQUIPPING UNDERWATER GLIDERS with acoustic sensors and computer software, Oregon State oceanographers are teaching the autonomous vehicles to identify biological hot spots in the oceans. “We want to get a better handle on what kind of marine animals are out there, how many there are, where they are distributed and how they respond […]


Computing Resilience
May 11, 2015

Computing Resilience

University consortium targets community infrastructure

Earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes and other natural disasters strike with little or no warning. By developing new computer tools to evaluate buildings, utility networks and other infrastructure, Oregon State is helping communities to reduce damage and speed recovery.


Lack of Vitamin E May Threaten Brain Health
May 11, 2015

Lack of Vitamin E May Threaten Brain Health

Micronutrient could be an Alzheimer’s risk factor

New research shows that vitamin E is needed to prevent a dramatic loss of a critically important molecule in the brain and helps explain why vitamin E is needed for brain health.


Student-Built Solar Car to the Middle East
May 11, 2015

Student-Built Solar Car to the Middle East

Oregon State’s Phoenix runs in Abu Dhabi’s first solar race

AT LAST WINTER’S ABU DHABI Solar Challenge, residents of the Persian Gulf emirate would pull alongside competitors on the highway, lean out and take photos of the solar-powered vehicles. Solar cars are as much a novelty there as in the United States, says John Ren, a member of the solar car team at Oregon State […]


Of Mice, Astronauts and the Elderly
May 11, 2015

Of Mice, Astronauts and the Elderly

Studying bone loss on the International Space Station

With funding from NASA, scientists from Oregon State are looking at how mice expend energy under weightless conditions. Specifically, they want to know if the manner in which animals regulate body temperature affects bone loss.


Student Research: Electric Earth
May 11, 2015

Student Research: Electric Earth

Honors student looks at how the West was made

Through the science of geomagnetics, an Oregon State University senior from Beaverton is peering into the structure of the Earth’s crust with an eye on how the continent is put together and what that might mean for our future.


Perspectives: Discovering Our “Research-Impact” Identities
May 11, 2015

Perspectives: Discovering Our “Research-Impact” Identities

Transcending the academic rat race and remembering why we do science

“It’s essential to help faculty transcend the rat race, to create something new, to grow research impacts from the set of underlying principles that burn in the heart of each researcher.”


Taking the Plunge
May 11, 2015

Taking the Plunge

First-year engineering student hits her stride

If engineering still seems like a male domain, you wouldn’t know it by talking to Amber Meeks. While she says she was “that one girl” growing up in Gaston, Oregon, with three brothers, she has plenty of female engineering peers at Oregon State. They run the gamut from chemical and biomedical to electrical and civil […]


Natural Determination
April 27, 2015

Natural Determination

Documenting women’s fight for equity in wildlife biology

To be a wildlife biologist, it helps to have skills: to climb 30 feet up a tree to reach an eagle’s nest, to monitor a tranquilized wolf before it wakes or to track a wolverine in the high country. And in years past, it would have helped to be a man. For much of the […]


Solar Car Race Offers Gold Standard Learning in Abu Dhabi
February 26, 2015

Solar Car Race Offers Gold Standard Learning in Abu Dhabi

Call it the experience of a lifetime. Or just call it part of a great education at Oregon State. In January, nine OSU students took a solar car they built to the United Arab Emirates to participate in the Abu Dhabi Solar Challenge, a four-day, 1,200 kilometer race. This was the first international competition for […]


When Will the Rains Come?
February 23, 2015

When Will the Rains Come?

This weather phenomenon feeds millions

Researchers at the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences are trying to improve our ability to forecast a phenomenon known as the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). This eastward-moving pulse of heavy rainfall and strong winds travels around the equator and has broad impacts on climate and weather. While statistical indices of the MJO from past […]


Understanding Tropical Reefs
February 16, 2015

Understanding Tropical Reefs

Microbes may hold a key to threatened corals

    By David Baker All signs pointed to Ryan McMinds attending Oregon State University as an undergraduate. Both of his parents graduated from OSU, and he grew up just down the road in Jefferson, Oregon. It was always his default choice. “But at the last minute, I decided that I needed to travel and […]


Closing in on Cholera
February 10, 2015

Closing in on Cholera

A discovery holds promise for preventing a widespread disease

In the life of Bo Park, there’s a quirky connection between her early childhood in South Korea and her pharmacology research at Oregon State University: fish. In the city of Incheon where she was born, her mom and dad sold hot bowls of fishcake soup from the food truck they owned and operated. As a […]


Nuclear Sleuthing
January 12, 2015

Nuclear Sleuthing

The science of nuclear forensics helps thwart terrorist attacks

  “There’s still much too much material — nuclear, chemical, biological — being stored without enough protection.  There are still terrorists and criminal gangs doing everything they can to get their hands on it. And make no mistake, if they get it, they will use it; potentially killing hundreds of thousands of innocent people, perhaps […]


Accidentally Blue
October 15, 2014

Accidentally Blue

Patented OSU pigment draws interest from artists, industry

Mas Subramanian didn’t expect to find a brilliant blue pigment when he was looking for new semiconductors. But the Milton Harris Chair Professor of Materials Science in the Oregon State University Department of Chemistry was shocked in 2009 when he saw a graduate student take a powder with a vibrant blue hue out of a […]


New labs focus on stormwater, floods
October 15, 2014

New labs focus on stormwater, floods

Facilities supported by Oregon BEST

When floods arrive, hydrologists scramble. They run computer models to evaluate the need for evacuation. They gather data to understand impacts on fish, soils and water quality. Now, Oregon State researchers will have access to two new labs that enable them to test theories before the downpour. A Multipurpose River Hydraulics Research Facility will be […]


Green Neighborhoods Lead to Better Birth Outcomes
October 15, 2014

Green Neighborhoods Lead to Better Birth Outcomes

Researchers gathered data on more than 64,000 births

Where the grass is greener, pregnancies tend to be fullterm, and babies tend to have higher birth weights. The findings hold up even when results are adjusted for factors such as neighborhood income, exposure to air pollution, noise and neighborhood walkability, according to researchers at Oregon State University and the University of British Columbia. “This […]


Oregon birders and citizen scientists join eBird project
October 13, 2014

Oregon birders and citizen scientists join eBird project

A team of ornithologists, birders and citizen scientists is collecting data on Oregon birds through a project called Oregon 2020. “Oregon has a few species of birds we know very well — like the spotted owl, the sage grouse and the meadowlark,” says W. Douglas Robinson, the Mace Professor of Watchable Wildlife at OSU and […]


Of Spots and Stripes
October 13, 2014

Of Spots and Stripes

Two related owl species compete for the last stands of old-growth forest

To hear Katie Dugger tell it, you’d think catching a baby northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) for scientific banding was as easy as taking a Tootsie Roll from a toddler. “They’re so mellow and laid-back,” the ornithologist says. “If the owl is sitting low enough in a tree, as is often the case, you […]


Innovation: Smart Bike Helmet
October 10, 2014

Innovation: Smart Bike Helmet

Alert is sent after an accident

Bike helmets have long proven their worth by helping to prevent head injuries. Now a team of OSU student interns who worked at Intel last summer has turned the durable plastic shells into an emergency beacon, communicator and diagnostic tool in the event of an accident. Equipped with electronics that can detect and analyze a […]


Technical Assistance
October 10, 2014

Technical Assistance

Students develop robots to empower people

Last summer, Ben Arvey took an electric wheelchair for a test drive. He blinked his eyes, and as the Google Glass on his head relayed those small movements through the Internet, the chair moved forward. With no assistance from Arvey, it swerved to avoid a table and then straightened out as though traveling down a […]


Success in STEM fields
October 10, 2014

Success in STEM fields

NSF grants aim to diversify the workforce

Two five-year grants from the National Science Foundation aim to increase the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in science, technology, engineering and math disciplines, or STEM, at Oregon State University. Through a program known as ADVANCE, OSU will recruit and promote women in STEM fields and implement policies to address needs across race, sexual […]


The GMO Conundrum
October 10, 2014

The GMO Conundrum

We could lose an important crop-improvement tool to politics and fear

Oregonians will go to the polls on November 4 to decide whether or not to require prominent labels on food containing ingredients made from genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. The issue of labeling has been around for years, and — déjà vu! — Oregonians have even voted on it before. But the rhetoric has heated […]


Arrested Development
October 10, 2014

Arrested Development

Intellectual property and regulations hinder research

Genetic engineering has become a valuable scientific tool. It has enabled us to gain tremendous insight into the mechanisms of plant reproduction, disease resistance and other useful traits. However, commercial use of this technology has not lived up to expectations and has created serious hurdles for plant breeders. That in turn hampers genetic progress and […]


University of Alaska Joins Wave Energy Partnership
October 7, 2014

University of Alaska Joins Wave Energy Partnership

Wave energy researchers will focus on the tidal inlets and coastal waves of Alaska as a result of a $4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Until now, the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center has been a partnership of Oregon State University and the University of Washington. “Alaska has an enormous energy […]