Coastal Views

Four residents of Oregon's shore — a fisherman, a former mayor, a teacher and a doctor — weigh in on wave energy.

Scott Hartzell

Fisherman

Taking an annual harvest of a quarter-million pounds of Dungeness from his 85-foot craft Ossian, this crabber brings a lifetime of ocean experience to his role as an “industry cooperator” with OSU. “I’m interested in the location of the wave park, how it’s going to be anchored, how invasive it’s going to be for the environment and how intrusive it might be to the Dungeness crab industry.”

Tom Tymchuk

Board member, Central Lincoln Public Utility District

At 77, this former mayor could be forgiven if he whiled away his afternoons down at the local taqueria, waxing bitter with the town elders about the way things are going. But instead, he has become a leading booster for wave energy. “I intend to stay involved, no matter how old I get.”

Keith Tymchuk

President, Port of Umpqua

A lifelong Reedsport mover and shaker, this schoolteacher sees tapping waves for electricity as a 21st century use for an ancient resource. “Its great advantage is that you don’t have to deplete the resource as you go.”

Ron Vail

Board member, Reedsport School District

Since the mill closed, school enrollments have dropped sharply, forcing this physician and his fellow board members to make Draconian cuts in faculty and programs. “Every year it’s a crisis. I see the wave park as a unique opportunity to bring family-wage jobs back to the area and help stabilize student enrollment.”

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