Question of the Week: 3-day Clearance Sale

August 20th, 2014 | Kyle Reed

cup-sun-win-meTime for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable OSU cold cup (with straw).

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

The OSUsed Store will be holding a Clearance Sale this week from today (Wednesday) to Friday. What are the discounts that will be offered on each day?

Answer

Marked items will have a 25% off discount applied on Wednesday, 50% off on Thursday, and 75% off on Friday.

The 3-day Clearance Sale will have increased hours, lasting from 12 – 4 pm each day.

Further details about the sale may be found on the Surplus website.

And congratulations to Dann on Facebook for being the first to correctly answer this week’s Question!

Marked items will have a 25% off discount applied on Wednesday, 50% off on Thursday, and 75% off on Friday.
The 3-day Clearance Sale will have increased hours, lasting from 12 – 4 pm each day.
More details may be found here: http://surplus.oregonstate.edu/special-sale
Marked items will have a 25% off discount applied on Wednesday, 50% off on Thursday, and 75% off on Friday.
The 3-day Clearance Sale will have increased hours, lasting from 12 – 4 pm each day.
More details may be found on the Surplus website.
And congratulations to Dann on Facebook for being the first to correctly answer this week’s Question!


3-Day Clearance at OSUsed Store August 20-22

August 18th, 2014 | Andrea Norris

Clearance sale graphic

The OSUsed Store is open for a 3-day clearance sale this Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, August 20-22, at 12-4 pm each day. Take advantage of extended hours and extra low prices!

Look for special green clearance stickers on merchandise throughout the store; the prices on those items will drop throughout the week – 25% off Wednesday, 50% off Thursday and 75% off on Friday! Clearance prices will apply to specially marked items only.

Available merchandise will include computers and computer accessories, furniture (desks, file cabinets, tables, chairs, bookcases, etc), office supplies, sporting goods, household items, bicycles and much more.

The OSUsed Store is located at 644 SW 13th Street in Corvallis (view on Google Maps). The store is operated by OSU Surplus Property and sells surplus equipment and material to departments on campus, as well as members of the public during special public sales, in an effort to reduce landfill waste.

Just some of the merchandise sold at the OSUsed Store.

The OSUsed Store carries a variety of used items for sale. Click to view larger.

Public sales are typically held on Wednesdays throughout the year. This three-day clearance sale occurs annually at the end of the summer to make room for furniture that is moved around and replaced at the start of the school year.

While our public sales provide an opportunity for the general public to make personal purchases, departments are welcome to shop 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, or during public sales. Clearance prices are only valid during the public sale times listed above, however.

See our other sale dates on our calendar. For more information, visit our public sale page or contact us.


Question of the Week: What Goes in a Worm Bin

August 13th, 2014 | Kyle Reed

spork-win-meTime for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable OSU spork and a $1 Gift Certificate to any UHDS Dining Center.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

Shown below are five images of items which can be composted. Which item(s) can NOT be put into a worm bin?

Animal Food WasteCompostable UtensilsPaper TowelsPizza BoxVegetable Food Waste

Answer

Animal food waste and compostable servingware are not compostable in a worm bin.

Food waste from animal products, such as meat, dairy, and eggs, can cause strong, unpleasant odors and attract pests. Meanwhile, the compostable servingware requires high temperatures, such as those created at the PRC, in order to break down. Both of these items may be composted in the curbside Yard Debris bins in Corvallis.

In a worm bin, cardboard should be torn into small strips or chunks to make it easier for the worms to digest, and fruits and vegetables which can alter the pH of the environment (ie, tomatoes and citrus) should be avoided or kept in small quantities.

Campus Recycling can provide worm bins or other composting options to interested departments, who need only to fill-out a request form to sign up.


Field Work Opportunity: Rim Fire Conifer Regeneration Study

August 8th, 2014 | Sam

13584495933_fbbcd96e57_zDrs. Chad Hanson and Dominick DellaSala are looking for field work assistance for an upcoming survey taking place in the Rim fire burn. The survey will be taking place in late August or early September of this year and all surveyors will work in teams of two.

Surveying will involve hiking cross-country through uneven terrain of varying degrees of steepness for approximately 8 hours per day.  Surveyors will need to be fit, and will need to bring basic essentials, including hiking boots, hat, sunblock, food and water each day.

Post-fire natural conifer regeneration surveys will be conducted in the 10 largest high-severity fire patches in montane conifer forest predominantly or entirely on USFS lands in the Rim fire burn, Stanislaus National Forest, western/central Sierra Nevada, using the standard high-severity fire threshold (Miller and Thode 2007).

From the nearest access point, surveys will be conducted in plots along transects through the center of the patches, with plots spaced by 200 m.  All plots will be 0.02 ha in size, and square, with corners facing in the four cardinal directions.  All distances will be determined with a laser hypsometer.  For the five largest high-severity fire patches, three transects will be conducted—one in northern portion, one in central portion, and one in southern portion.

In each plot, surveyors will: 1) mark the center point and corners with colored flags on steel posts; 2) record GPS coordinates of the center point; 3) record the species, diameter at breast height (dbh), and live/dead status of each pre-fire tree >30 cm dbh; 4) record the distance of the three nearest live trees to the plot’s center point, and the species of each of these trees; 5) record the plot’s aspect and slope; 6) record the number of conifer seedlings of each species in the plot; 7) record the height (cm) and species of the five tallest conifer seedlings in the plot; 8 ) record the number of oak seedlings and oak sprouts from the base of trees for which the above-ground portion was killed; and 9) record ground cover (both live foliage and twigs/needles).

The final product will be a manuscript coauthored by Drs. Chad Hanson and Dominick DellaSala with authorships offered to students working on the project. They are also seeking modest travel support to cover expenses in the field for about a week of work.

You can read DellaSala’s rainforest blog here and if you are interested in this project please contact Dominick A. DellaSala by email.


“Let’s Pull Together!” Invasive Plant Eradication Event

August 7th, 2014 | Sam

On Saturday, September 6th, bring your friends and family to help remove invasive plant species! The Marys River Watershed Council, a member organization ofLets Pull Together Benton Country Cooperative Weed Management, is hosting an invasive plant species removal project at a stream restoration site on Beaver Creek.

The group will be removing English ivy at the site from 9 to noon on Saturday the 6th, followed by a celebration at Willamette Park from noon to 3.

Let’s Pull Together is a trademarked event of the Orchard District Neighborhood Association (ODNA) in Bend, Oregon. ODNA began the Let’s Pull Together Event in 2003, to raise awareness about knapweed.

The mission of the Benton County Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) is to coordinate community-based efforts against those invasive species that have the potential to cause ecological and economic harm in Benton County.

You can learn more at the CWMA’s website and sign up for the event here. Join in and take a step to reduce the impacts of invasive plants!


Question of the Week: Percent of E-waste in Landfills

August 6th, 2014 | Kyle Reed

bottle-isolated-win-meTime for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable 20 oz. OSU water bottle.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

E-waste is defined as any discarded electronics, and represents 2% of the trash in landfills. How much of the overall toxic waste does it account for?

Answer

While e-waste only represents 2% of America’s trash in landfills, it makes up 70% of the overall toxic waste.

E-waste contains many toxic chemicals, including lead, mercury, arsenic, beryllium, and cadmium. Between 80 to 85% of electronics are discarded in landfills or incinerators.

Materials Management is currently hiring an E-Waste Project Coordinator to help with its goal of becoming e-Stewards certified by April 2015. E-Stewards is a worldwide recognized standard for organizations who dispose electronic waste responsibly. Click here to learn more about the e-Stewards certification.

And congratulations to Seema Mangla for winning this week’s Question!


Solar at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center

August 5th, 2014 | Sam

The North Willamette Research and Extension Center, the site of OSU’s newest solar array, has been successfully using the produced energy for more than 5 months now.

The solar array is part of a larger OSU initiative to utilize alternative energy at its facilities. This installation, on the NWREC’s 160 acre farm across from Charbonneau and Miley Road, began construction last October and began producing electricity at the beginning of the new year.

DSC09533

The Center’s energy consumption per month is approximately 20,000 kWh and the new array has been producing between 23,000 and 35,000 kWh, considerably more than is needed. Conveniently, the excess energy is put back into the grid and the Center is given credits towards energy use during the lower production months. It is forecasted that six to seven months of the year the array will produce more energy than necessary which will help cover the remaining costs.

At NWREC, bills are paid to Solar City, who owns the array and is responsible for all the operations and maintenance, as well as PGE for line/meter charges and any power needed that isn’t produced with the solar system. So far, the NWREC expects to reduce annual electrical bills by about 50% or $10-50,000.

sheep1

A more recent addition to the array includes a new form of vegetation management. There are three sheep grazing on site for the summer to utilize the plentiful grass. The sheep are a great, low maintenance way to keep the vegetation in check and make for some happy sheep. The NWREC is also  looking at developing bee pollinator habitat for the array in 2015.

Don’t forget you can monitor the array’s data records here to see how they are doing now and in the months to come.


Conservation and Wildlife at Oregon State

August 1st, 2014 | Sam

The National Wildlife Federation recently highlighted Oregon State in an article about the University’s commitment to conservation and wildlife. Kristy Jones, the manager of campus climate education and action in National Wildlife Federation’s Campus Ecology program, had this to say about OSU’s accomplishments.

“Oregon State University in Corvallis is committed to conservation and wildlife both on and off campus. OSU has proven to be a leader in campus sustainability for many years. In 2011, National Wildlife Federation’s Campus Ecology program recognized OSU for their Energy Center, the nation’s first LEED Platinum-rated power facility and their Student Sustainability Initiative. OSU has also attained a Gold rating in STARS – the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System; received the highest green ranking in Oregon and was listed as 11th in the nation in the 2013 Sierra Club “Cool Schools” ranking; and placed first in 2010, 2011, and 2012 in the annual Civil War RecycleMania competition with University of Oregon.

35th_st_westward

In addition to these accomplishments, OSU has also made a significant effort to protect wildlife and natural resources on campus through the Oak Creek Restoration project. Restoration efforts have included the removal of invasive species like Himalayan blackberry and English ivy, reforesting areas of the corridor, reconnecting the floodplain, and properly treating and buffering storm water discharge into the creek ensuring a healthy aquatic habitat for fish and amphibians. Oak Creek is also an outdoor learning lab – students have the opportunity to evaluate various restoration and protection methods, study riparian function and monitor stream improvements.

So, what else is OSU doing for wildlife?

OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute (MMI) is a facility that brings together the work and expertise of many programs including engineering, genetics, agriculture, aquatics, ecology, veterinary medicine, biology and communications.

Whales

“As the only institute of its kind, the Marine Mammal Institute combines the efforts of top researchers from around the world to continue the legacy of discovery and preservation of critical habitats of target species and understanding how they interact with their environment and human activities.”

The Institute consists of six labs,one of which is the Cetacean Conservation and Genomics Laboratory (CCGL). The CCGL is committed to researching the molecular ecology and systematics of whales, dolphins and porpoises around the world to learn from their past, assess their present, with an ultimate goal of ensuring these marine mammals thrive long into the future.

The lab looks at the impact of hunting on whale populations and the ecological role they played before human exploitation. To assess their current status, CCGL is involved in three collaborative studies focused on populations, genetic diversity and migration, specifically looking at Humpback and Sperm whales. CCGL alsosurveys the ‘whale-meat’ markets in Japan and the Republic of (South) Korea to learn more about what the future holds.

Learn more about OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute and their work on whales, dolphins, porpoises, seals, sea lions, and walruses.”

Oregon State University has always held its Conservation and Wildlife practices in the highest regard, which is reflected in the numerous facilities, programs, and events the school has to offer. If you would like to learn more about sustainability at OSU, click here!


Question of the Week: Film Plastic Recycling

July 30th, 2014 | Kyle Reed

ChicoBag-win-meTime for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win an OSU ChicoBag.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

Film plastic is not accepted in campus or curbside recycling. Name three locations in Corvallis where you can take film plastic to be recycled.

Answer

In Corvallis, film plastic may be taken to the Republic Services Depot, as well as several grocery stores, including: Fred Meyer, Safeway, Grocery Outlet, and Winco.

Film plastic is the soft, stretchable plastic used for grocery bags and shrink wrap. Make sure that the film plastic is clean if you plan to recycle it.

This type of plastic is separately collected due to the damages it can cause to machinery at Material Recovery Facilities. Read more about this on our Recycling Mythbusters blog post.

And congratulations to Geoffrey Somnitz on Facebook, and Kit Arbogast here on the blog, for winning this week’s Question! Keep up the great work.



New course offering: Social Dimensions of Sustainability

July 29th, 2014 | Kyle Reed

Dimensions sustainability courseA new online course will be offered during Fall 2014 for students in natural resources, environmental sciences, social sciences, and students interested in the Sustainability Double-Degree.

Beginning with a discussion on the importance of a social science perspective for study of sustainability issues, the course will compliment the ecological aspects of sustainability by exposing students to its social dimensions. The course will briefly examine the various theoretical and methodological tools for studying sustainability, with the remainder centering on the interrelationship between the environmental, social, economic and political structures associated with sustainability.

Course work will include online discussion board assignments, writing assignments, and a capstone project culminating in a critique of an organization’s social sustainability campaign message (including corporate social responsibility and social justice messages).

For more information, contact Lori Cramer or Derric Jacobs.

Course Details:

SOC399 (section 400): Social Dimensions of Sustainability

Credits: 4

CRN: 21086

Instructor: Derric Jacobs

Prerequisites: SOC204 (or permission of the instructor)