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The Oregon State University Sustainability Blog
Updated: 5 hours 34 min ago

SSI Travel Grantee: Allison Marshall

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 11:35am
Allison Marshall was awarded $322 by the SSI Fee Board in November of 2013 to attend the American Water Resources Association Annual Conference in Portland, Oregon. The Fee Board funded her travel, lodging, and conference registration. ————————————————————————

The travel grant I was awarded from SSI allowed me to attend the annual conference for the American Water Resources Association. I am seeking a degree in Water Resources Engineering and I am particularly interested in trying to find creative, sustainable solutions to water resource conflicts. At the conference, I was able to present my graduate research as part of a symposium about participatory modeling. The presenters and attendees of the symposium were a dynamic group of forward-thinking, creative problem solvers who have used collaborative processes together with modeling techniques. The goals of these approaches include fostering relationships between water users or managers while supporting co-learning about the dynamics of the water resource. By focusing on relationship building and recognizing the importance of local knowledge in natural resource issues, these approaches aim to produce more sustainable solutions that extend beyond the current conflict and help to grow networks of resource managers who can collaborate on future projects as well.

By speaking in this workshop as well as meeting the other presenters and attendees, I was able to greatly expand my knowledge of this relatively new field. I gained valuable feedback that will not only help to improve my current graduate research project, but will contribute to my knowledge as I try to apply these skills in a career. I was also proud to present my research and share the experience and lessons I have learned so far. Many other attendees commented that my project gave a good example of practical application of the theory.

- Allison Marshall

Categories: Ecologue

Question of the Week: RecycleMania Civil War

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 7:00pm

Time for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win an OSU ChicoBag.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

Every year for RecycleMania, OSU and UO become locked in a civil war to see who can recycle the most. As of March 11, who is currently in the lead? Please list the university and how many lbs. recycling/student they have.

Answer

Currently, UO is in the lead of the recycling civil war. While we are trailing UO, the good news is that we CUT THEIR LEAD IN HALF over last week. There’s still time to tighten the gap!

And congratulations to Dianna Fisher for winning this week’s Question of the Week!

Categories: Ecologue

Women’s Center Clothing Swap.

Mon, 03/10/2014 - 4:48pm

Spring is here and nature is looking fabulous. Now you can too! The Winter term gloom is on its way out as spring break 2014 is coming upon us. And there is a new and fun way to update your wardrobe, and get a great start on spring term.

The Winter 2014 Women’s Center Clothing Swap is happening now!
Students, both Women and men, can participate in the Women’s Center Clothing swap taking happening during Dead week, March 10, 2014 – March 14, 2013.

Bring your gently worn clothing items and accessories to the Women’s Center before during dead week, and then prepare yourself for some major swapping!
Swapping will continue all week during our normal hours, Monday – Thursday from 9:00AM to 6:00PM and Friday from 9:00AM to 5:00PM

Categories: Ecologue

Third Climate Change Conversation to be Hosted Tomorrow

Mon, 03/10/2014 - 2:32pm

Content adapted from Debra Whigbes

Seven Steps toward a More Sustainable Household

Date and Time: Tuesday, March 11th at 7:00 PM

Place: Corvallis-Benton County Library (645 NW Monroe)

Feeling helpless about climate change and don’t know what to do?  Consider this. Seven experts will talk about how good it can be on the path toward a low-carbon footprint.  Each presenter will briefly outline their topic, to be followed by a break-out session where audience members can seek more information from individual experts. The following presenters will teach and inspire us about how to make practical and meaningful changes in the areas of energy, consumption, gardening, transportation and simplifying our lives.

  • Sustainable Consumption – Babe O’Sullivan’s (Eugene’s Sustainability Liaison). Babe will focus on the front end of the consumer cycle, explaining how choices and behavior changes can make a huge difference in reducing the impact of what we buy.
  • The New Landscape – Owen Dell, RLA, ASLA (Landscape Architect). Owen will discuss home gardening and sustainable landscaping, connecting it to community, energy use, and food security.
  • Alternative Transportation – Glencora Borradaile (OSU Assistant Professor) & Michael Gretes, (Researcher, OHSU). This couple both have successful careers yet choose not to own a car.  They will extol the importance, economics, the lifestyle enhancement and joy of not gaining 3,000 lbs.
  • Simplicity – Dr. Steve Cook (OSU Senior Instructor).  Steve will explain his simple and sustainable lifestyle and will share his rewards, successes and challenges along that path.
  • Your Ecological Home – Skip Wenz (author of “Your Ecological Home”). Will give a positive vision and the future benefits for those householders who take home and apply these and other easy and sustainable changes.
  • Household Energy— Brandon Trelstad (OSU’s Sustainability Coordinator).  Will highlight the amazing energy reduction possible with informed appliance choices, with a special focus on the exciting new heat pump water heater that uses dramatically less energy.
  • Solar Energy: Julie Williams (founder of Seeds for the Sol).  Solar energy is the most expansive and economical shift for a long term energy source.  If we help each other transition to solar energy, today, we can stop getting ready for the apocalypse and begin our true willingness to live a fair, just, and beautiful life.

For more information contact Debra at dwhigbes@gmail, or 541-554-6979.

Categories: Ecologue

Question of the Week: Energy Savings from Aluminum Can Recycling

Wed, 03/05/2014 - 2:00pm

Time for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable 20 oz. OSU water bottle.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

In this week’s Recycling Mythbusters blog post, we discuss the benefits of recycling various materials. If you were to recycle one aluminum can, for how many hours would the energy savings power a television?

Answer Recycling just one aluminum can will produce enough energy savings to power a television for three hours. The overall energy savings from recycling cans is about 95% over creating a new can. To learn more about the benefits of recycling different materials, visit the Ecologue: Recycling just one aluminum can will produce enough energy savings to power a television for three hours. The overall energy savings from recycling cans is about 95% over creating a new can. To learn more about the benefits of recycling different materials, visit the Recycling Mythbusters blog. And congratulations to Jessica Collins for being the first to correctly answer the question!
Categories: Ecologue

Recycling Mythbusters: Recycling vs. Landfilling

Tue, 03/04/2014 - 1:01pm

By Mythbuster Amanda Abbott

Who are the Recycling Mythbusters?

We are Kyle “Reedcycler” Reed, Amanda “Jill of All Trades” Abbott and Rachel “Waste Watcher” Tholl. This term we will be introducing you to some recycling-based myths, and busting them so you don’t have to.

From left to right: Amanda Abbott, Rachel Tholl, and Kyle Reed.

Together we are the Recycling Mythbusters.

We don’t just tell the myths, we put them to rest.

Myth: Recycling doesn’t benefit the environment any more than landfilling does.

As a special treat for our final segment of the Recycling Mythbusters series, this week’s blog will be in video format! A transcript of the video may be read below:

Click on the image to watch this week's Recycling Mythbusters blog.

A)  Glass is an interesting one to take a look at.  It really depends on where you are.  Some places take glass, crush it down, and use it as a base for roadways.  This isn’t really recycling it, but it’s got to be better than just dumping it in a landfill. (Illustration: broken glass in a landfill, as a layer on a road) K)  You’re right, but what about places that DO recycle it? A)  Places that recycle glass do so by breaking it down into cullet, or basically broken glass.  For every 10% of cullet that is used in glass creation, the energy costs decrease 2-3%.  So by using 50% cullet, you can make more than 10% more bottles for the same energy cost! K) So it isn’t much, but Glass is definitely busted! Transcript Amanda) We’re here today to look at the myth that it’s better to throw things away than actually recycling them, based on the costs of doing so. What do you think, Kyle? Kyle) Oh, I definitely think that’s going to be busted, you? A)I don’t know, I mean, I think they might have something, at least for some types of material. Maybe plastic? K) Yeah, you’re right, we should probably break this down into smaller parts, and take a look at glass, paper, plastic, and metal, and see what kind of numbers we get. Paper A) Paper products are recycled by being pulped down, and remade into a lower quality paper product.  So for example, what started as a high quality piece of printer paper might then be turned into a cardboard box, then into a newspaper, and finally into toilet paper, depending on a variety of factors. Using old paper instead of new wood can save a bunch!  Recycling one ton of paper, the amount one person uses in two and a half years, saves 17 trees and 7,000 gallons of water! A) And that’s not all: Recycling is better monetarily as well. It costs $15/ton more to landfill paper trash, than it does to recycle or compost it. Paper is definitely busted. Plastic A) Plastic was the one I thought might be confirmed, but actually, it’s a lot harder to find the benefit with this one.  Like paper, plastic can be broken down into levels of quality. This can be both the numbers that you sometimes see, but also plastics without a number, like plastic wrap.

A) Plastics like plastic bottles are well worth the recycling effort.  For example, the state of Oregon has a deposit on beverage bottles, to help ensure that they are recycled in the community. A) Other types of plastic, not so much.  The cost to recycle some types of hard plastic means that many places just don’t do it.  It isn’t worth the cost, and while 4% of our energy use in the united states is in refining plastic, many hard plastics aren’t worth the money to do so. A) So we’ll call it plausible.  Depending on your type of plastic, it might not be worth the money to recycle it.  That being said, if you can recycle it, you should. Metal A) Metal is an interesting one, as it is a non-renewable resource, which can run out.  While this alone is reason enough to recycle it, let’s take a look at the costs associated with it. A) Aluminum cans, one of the most common items, have an incredible energy difference.  For each can recycled, enough energy is saved to power a computer or television for 3 hours.  That’s about a 95% energy savings over creating a new can. A)Metal? Busted without a doubt. Glass

A) Glass is an interesting one to take a look at.  It really depends on where you are.  Some places take glass, crush it down, and use it as a base for roadways.  This isn’t really recycling it, but it’s got to be better than just dumping it in a landfill. A)  Places that recycle glass do so by breaking it down into cullet, or basically broken glass.  For every 10% of cullet that is used in glass creation, the energy costs decrease 2-3%.  So by using 50% cullet, you can make more than 10% more bottles for the same energy cost! A) So it isn’t much, but Glass is definitely busted! Conclusions

And with that, we wrap up the final myth for our Recycling Mythbusters series. Thank you for joining us on this journey of fixing falsehoods and misconceptions. If you missed a week, you can view any of the previous blogs here. And be sure to tune in next week, where we’ll meet the Recycling Mythbusters themselves.

This post is part of our “Recycling Mythbusters” blog series, where we focus on busting common misconceptions about recycling. Tune in every week to learn more.


Categories: Ecologue

Garden workparty event at the SSC!

Mon, 03/03/2014 - 8:36pm

Winter Work Party – Come help SSI prepare for spring!!!

It’s the last garden work party of the season and we’re getting ready for spring with a bang!

Help us prepare the SSI student garden for Spring Term and:

  • Win fabulous and useful prizes!
  • Enjoy provided snacks and beverages!
  • Take a break from studying; clear your mind and dirty those hands!
  • Learn Valuable gardening tips to save time and money!
  • Meet and mingle with students from all majors!

When: March 6, 2014, 4-6 pm

Where: Student Sustainability Center, 738 SW 15th Street (near the Pride Center and INTO building)

Final Garden Work Party!

Come make garden magic happen!

Categories: Ecologue

RideScout: The App That Revolutionizes How to Get Around Town

Fri, 02/28/2014 - 2:15pm

RideScout, a free and revolutionary new app, now makes life a little easier when moving from point A to point B. RideScout finds alternative modes of transportation in town that are local to your area. Many transportation services offer their own apps, but the user-friendly RideScout combines all your options into one. This app uses your current location and allows you to input a destination of your choice. Once you choose where you want to go, it provides multiple options for you to choose from. This app also tells you how many calories you would burn by getting there on foot or by bike, as well as how much it would cost in gas to drive there.

This app was launched in November. Although it is not fully functioning for all transportation options in the city of Corvallis, it is fully integrated in Washington D.C. and Austin, Texas with plans for expansion into other large metropolitan areas. For example, in Washington D.C., RideScout is able to provide live information on how many bikes are available at the nearest Capital City Bikeshare.. Users are also able to have the app alert them at the necessary time to start walking to the nearest stop to catch the bus they would like to ride.

One of the co-founders, Joseph Kosper, stated that, “Our vision statement is seamless door-to-door transportation. What I mean by that is every safe, legal, and reliable way that’s out there, we want to bring to you in the palm of your hand or onto your desktop so you can have all your options.” Although this app was created to provide options, the creators’ ultimate goal is to revolutionize how Americans think about how they travel and take the focus off cars-only transportation.

Categories: Ecologue

Question of the Week: Disposal of E-Waste

Wed, 02/26/2014 - 3:00pm

Time for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable OSU spork.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

Many electronic waste items include hazardous materials. Because of this, what three types of e-waste are illegal to dispose of in landfills in Oregon?

Answer

Under House Bill 2626, it is illegal to dispose of 1.) televisions, 2.) computers (CPUs and laptops), and 3.) monitors at any Oregon landfill. If any of the above items are found in OSU waste, we may be fined and be liable for the cost of removing the items from the landfill. Under the Oregon E-Cycles program, manufacturers are required to provide free recycling for the a minimum of seven items of the above at a time. In January 2015, printers, keyboards, and mice will be added to the Oregon e-cycles program. For information on how to dispose of e-waste on campus, visit our webpage:

Under House Bill 2626, it is illegal at any Oregon landfill to dispose of the following:

1) televisions

2) computers (CPUs and laptops)

3) monitors

If any of the above items are found in OSU waste, we may be fined and be liable for the cost of removing the items from the landfill.

Under the Oregon E-Cycles program, manufacturers are required to provide free recycling for the a minimum of seven items of the above at a time. In January 2015, printers, keyboards, and mice will be added to the Oregon e-cycles program.

For information on how to dispose of e-waste on campus, visit our webpage.

Categories: Ecologue

Recycling Mythbusters: Biodegradable vs. Compostable

Tue, 02/25/2014 - 3:30pm
If you throw a biodegradable item into the compost at home, it will break down into a more natural form – for instance, biodegradable paper will turn into tiny bits of paper. However it will not offer nutrients to the soil in a compost bin. This is why biodegradable products do not belong in compost bins. However, it is morally difficult to throw biodegradable items into the trash can because landfills typically do not offer the moisture- and sunshine-rich biome that biodegradable products need in order to break down into their smallest and most basic form. For an item to be compostable, it must break down into organic materials that can offer nutrients to the soil and plants around it (the technical term is humus: any organic material that has reached a point of stability and can offer those healthy nutrients). Compostable items are usually food waste, such as apple cores, banana peels, orange rinds, etc. Very rarely do any other products qualify to be thrown into the compost bin. Although plenty of products are sold as biodegradable, plant-based, or bio-based, these are not compostable. To be safe, your compost bin with all its delicate plants and bugs and worms should not have any products other than food waste in it. Keep the compost bin clear of any plant-based products, because although they can biodegrade, they cannot offer your plants anything but an obstacle to grow around.

By Mythbusters Rachel Tholl and Kyle Reed

Who are the Recycling Mythbusters?

We are Kyle “Reedcycler” Reed, Amanda “Jill of All Trades” Abbott and Rachel “Waste Watcher” Tholl. This term we will be introducing you to some recycling-based myths, and busting them so you don’t have to.

From left to right: Amanda Abbott, Rachel Tholl, and Kyle Reed.

Together we are the Recycling Mythbusters.

We don’t just tell the myths, we put them to rest.

Myth: If something is biodegradable, it is also compostable.

When something is called biodegradable, it means that it will break down into smaller parts after being disposed of. However, being biodegradable does not mean that it is also compostable. The largest reason for this is that while a biodegradable item may break down into smaller bits, these components may not be able to provide any nutrients when used as compost.

Click on this image to watch a video about composting in the PRC.

For an item to be compostable, it must break down into organic materials that can offer nutrients to the soil and plants around it (the technical term is humus: any organic material that has reached a point of stability and can offer those healthy nutrients). And while some items may indeed do this, they must do so within the 90 day composting process to be accepted as compostable at the Pacific Region Compost (PRC) facility. Here, compostable items are subjected to high temperatures, which assists in breaking them down.

Compost made at the PRC is sold to local businesses, farmers, gardeners, and landscapers around Corvallis and the surrounding areas.

Want to learn more about composting in your department? Click here.

Compostable items sent to the PRC include: food waste (such as apple cores, banana peels, orange rinds, etc.), paper towels and napkins, tea bags and coffee grounds, 100% paper plates, and compostable servingware. Although plenty of products are sold as biodegradable, plant-based, or bio-based, these are not necessarily compostable, and only servingware specifically labelled as compostable should be put into a compost or yard debris bin.

If you are the owner of your own compost, or are using a department composting worm bin, you’d best leave out large items like compostable servingware, as they will take much longer to break down than food waste or fibrous paper.

If you’d like to learn more about composting on campus, click here.

This post is part of our “Recycling Mythbusters” blog series, where we focus on busting common misconceptions about recycling. Tune in every week to learn more.

Categories: Ecologue

Resident Hall Recycling Competition results are in

Tue, 02/25/2014 - 1:41pm

The Resident Hall Recycling Competition has come to an end, and the results are in: Halsell emerged the victor, finishing the competition with 3.63 lbs of recycling per person.

The scrap trophy that Halsell gets to keep over the next year.

Following in second and third were Bloss and West, with 2.92 and 2.86 pounds of recycling respectively.

Every res. hall will receive Inter-Hall Challenge points dependent upon their placement in the final results. Likewise, a trophy will be awarded to Halsell during the RHA General Assembly on Wednesday, Feb. 26.

Lasting from Feb. 1 through Feb. 21, the competition sought to divert recyclable items from the landfill by encouraging students to think about what they were throwing away. At the end of each week, the pounds of recycling per student were recorded, and results were posted in the dining centers, as well as the res. halls themselves.

The Res. Hall competition was a part of a nation-wide competition known as RecycleMania, where universities from across the US compete to see who can recycle the most.

A variety of waste reduction-related events will run each week alongside the competition. We hold the Res. Hall competition each year to help teach and encourage students to think about what they are throwing away.

Further details regarding the Res. Hall competition and RecycleMania may be found on the RecycleMania website.

Categories: Ecologue

Oregon State ranked in top ten Greenest Universities by BestColleges

Mon, 02/24/2014 - 4:16pm

A recent write-up by BestColleges.com documented Oregon State University as the ninth greenest university in

The interior of Kearney Hall after its green renovation

the United States. The website put together the list based on STARS (Sustainability Tracking, Rating, and Assessment System) scores given to each school through the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.

BestColleges published their top 32 picks for the greenest colleges in America, and mentioned OSU’s green remodels taking place on campus, the Campuses Take Charge annual program, and several other sustainable aspects of the university in it’s ninth place ranking of the school.

To read more about BestColleges rankings, and see what other schools were featured, check out the link to their website here.

Categories: Ecologue

Campus Conservation Nationals 2014

Fri, 02/21/2014 - 5:56pm

Campus Conservation Nationals is the largest conservation competition for colleges and universities in the world! This friendly competition measures the percent reduction of electricity and water usage in the residence buildings on campuses. Last year, the competition saved over 2 million kilowatt-hours of electricity and 1.5 million gallons of water! There are high hopes for this year with over 100 universities across America and Canada competing, but the competition is getting more and more ambitious. The overall competition is open from February 3rd to April 25th.

OSU has competed in the electricity reduction portion of the competition in previous years, but this will be the first year for water reduction on our campus. Our competition will run from February 24th to March 14th, and launched with a kickoff party in Marketplace West’s Large East Conference room Thursday February 20th in the evening. We had fun and informative conservation activities like bingo and guessing games, partnering groups with interactive games (Fresh From The Faucet, Solar Vehicle Team, and Sustainability Office), free desserts, giveaways like CFL bulbs, shower timers, and catchy stickers, and 105 commitments to conserve are recorded on the dashboard so far!

Check out our building dashboard for the results from the competition and conservation tips! Go Beavs!

OSU’s Building Dashboard: http://buildingdashboard.net/oregonstate/


CCN’s webpage: http://competetoreduce.org/ccn.html

Categories: Ecologue

Question of the Week: Triangle on plastic items

Thu, 02/20/2014 - 5:00pm

Time for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable 20 oz. OSU water bottle.

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

On many plastic items, there is a number surrounded by a triangle. What does this symbol mean?

Answer The type of plastic used. Each number correlates with a different polymer of plastic. This does not, however, tell whether or not the plastic is recyclable. To learn more about this system, visit our blog: http://oregonstate.edu/sustainability/blog/2014/01/recycling-mythbusters-the-recycling-symbol/

The type of plastic used.

Each number correlates with a different polymer of plastic. This does not, however, tell whether or not the plastic is recyclable.

To learn more about this system, visit our segment in the Recycling Mythbusters series, where we delve more deeply into the topic.

And congratulations to Walker Holden for being the first to correctly answer this week’s Question of the Week!

Categories: Ecologue

Oregon State Alums help outfit Team USA in Sochi

Wed, 02/19/2014 - 5:55pm

Imperial Stock Farm is located in Shaniko, Oregon, 60 miles south of The Dalles

Two Oregon State Alums, Dan and Jeanne Carver, own Oregon’s Imperial Stock Farm located on 50 square miles of the High Desert. Dan graduated from the Corvallis Campus in 1956 with a degree in business administration and technology, while Jeanne obtained her masters in Physical Education in 1979. The pair, their son Blaine, and his wife Keelia (both OSU graduates as well) produce yarn from the sheep on their stock farm and operate a large yarn warehouse that supplies the popular yarn to 300+ stores.

In an article by Kevin Miller for Oregon Stater Magazine, Jeanne recalls on a persistent caller from the summer of 2012. When she finally returned his call, she was shocked to hear that he was calling from Ralph Lauren in New York City. The caller informed her that

Team USA's sweaters were made exclusively with yarn from the Carver's ranch

he would like to place an order, and heard that Imperial’s yarn is the best in the business. Shortly, Ralph Lauren employees came to visit Imperial Stock Ranch, and placed the largest order the farm had ever seen. The Carver’s soon learned that this yarn would be used to outfit Team USA in the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics Opening Ceremonies.

The Carvers were featured in an NBC promotional piece as well as a spotlight on their Olympic Connection.

Their yarn was featured in the ever-so colorful sweaters that Team USA sported entering the Sochi stadium.

To read the whole story, or learn more about the Carver’s and Imperial Stock farm, click here.

Categories: Ecologue

Recycling Mythbusters: Contamination in Recycling

Tue, 02/18/2014 - 12:00pm

By Mythbuster Kyle Reed

Who are the Recycling Mythbusters?

We are Kyle “Reedcycler” Reed, Amanda “Jill of All Trades” Abbott and Rachel “Waste Watcher” Tholl. This term we will be introducing you to some recycling-based myths, and busting them so you don’t have to.

From left to right: Amanda Abbott, Rachel Tholl, and Kyle Reed.

Together we are the Recycling Mythbusters.

We don’t just tell the myths, we put them to rest.

Myth: Items put into the recycling bin aren’t actually recycled, and are instead thrown away.

Let’s start this myth with the knowledge that not everything is recyclable. Some items – known as contaminants – don’t belong in the recycling for numerous reasons. These contaminants can either appear in the form of non-marketable items, such as clamshells; items that simply belong in other recycling sorting systems, like plastic bags; or items that have food contamination, which can leach into other recyclables during transit.

Last week, we talked about how these items were removed from the sorting line. Unfortunately, not all items are able to be removed, due to the breakneck speeds by which the sorting lines move. Some are sorted out in later automated processes, but a portion may make their way through to be recycled. From there, they may completely ruin large portions of the recycled product, if not the entire batch.

This can have major repercussions. First, the market value of the contaminated recycled material is greatly diminished, and almost always ends up in the landfill because of that. Additional costs and damages are also caused due to contaminants. For example, recycling contamination in the city of Phoenix costs more than $1 million annually due to damaged machinery and disposal costs of wasted materials.

There isn’t a lot of leeway when it comes to contaminants that end up being recycled. According to the waste hauling company, Waste Management, even if just one contaminated item breaches through the sorting process, thousands of other items in the bale can be ruined as well, resulting in landfilling.

View OSU's online recycle guide

While recycling facilities continue to update and improve upon their sorting methods, the easiest remedy for this problem is simply to take the time to ensure that no contamination reaches the sorting facility in the first place.

Here, knowing is most of the battle. If you haven’t taken the time to do so, check out OSU’s recycle guide to learn about what is and isn’t recyclable on campus. Then, it’s just a matter of making sure that what you are putting into recycle bins is clean and ready to be recycled.

This post is part of our “Recycling Mythbusters” blog series, where we focus on busting common misconceptions about recycling. Tune in every week to learn more.

Categories: Ecologue

Transformation without Apocalypse: How to Live Well on an Altered Planet

Thu, 02/13/2014 - 4:00pm
The Spring Creek Project’s Winter Symposium kicks off tomorrow and runs through Saturday


The College of Liberal Arts– Spring Creek Project, presents Transformation Without Apocalypse, a two-day event discussing climate change, alternative visions of the future, and community awareness. The event will take place in LaSelles Stewart Center, beginning Valentine’s Day and running until 7:30 PM Saturday evening.

The Symposium features several keynote speakers including Tim DeChristopher, Ursula K. LeGuin, and Kim Stanley Robinson. Aside from presentations, the Spring Creek Project is also putting on free workshops, and a Radical Reimagining Fair featuring over 25 community sustainability related groups and organizations.

If you would like to participate in the event in anyway, click here for more information including registration and details on speakers and workshops.

See the Sustainability Office and Campus Recycling

The OSU Sustainability Office and Campus Recycling will be featured tabling on Saturday, February 15th at the Radical Reimagining Fair. Stop by and say hi!

Categories: Ecologue

Share recycling e-cards with your Valentine!

Thu, 02/13/2014 - 7:00am

If you are interested in sustainability, and presumably you are as a visitor of this blog, you may be thinking about how to go beyond throw-away trinkets to show your love this Valentine’s Day.

Might we suggest you both show your support for sustainability and appreciation for your loved ones by sharing recycling-themed E-Cards?

Visit THIS FACEBOOK ALBUM for several shareable Valentine’s cards put together by Campus Recycling and Waste Watcher volunteers.

Cards can be shared with all your Facebook friends, or you can share different ones for each of the special people in your life. And if you are not on Facebook, you can still view and download the cards to email to your loved ones.

Happy Valentine’s Day and happy RecycleMania 2014! More RecycleMania events and info are located here.

Categories: Ecologue

Question of the Week: February RecycleMania events

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 2:00pm
Time for our Question of the Week! The first person to respond with the correct answer will win a reusable 20 oz OSU water bottle! Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please. - See more at: http://oregonstate.edu/sustainability/blog/2014/01/question-of-the-week-plastic-clamshells/#sthash.sdx62pMx.dpuf

Be first to correctly answer the question and win an OSU ChicoBag!

Time for our Question of the Week!

The first person to respond with the correct answer will win an OSU ChicoBag

Submit your answer here (“Leave a Reply,” below) or on our Facebook page. Only one post per person, please.

Question of the Week

What are four upcoming or current RecycleMania events for the month of February? List the name and date of the events. (Hint: See our website for a RecycleMania calendar).

Categories: Ecologue

Outdoor Used Equipment Sale this Saturday

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 7:00am

OSU Rec Sports, in partnership with Surplus Property, will host a sale of used outdoor sporting equipment this Saturday, February 15 at McAlexander Fieldhouse. The event will be held 8:30-11:30 am but we recommend coming before 10 am for the best selection.

Come find great deals on used gear including camping, skiing, climbing, boating and more! For more information, contact the Adventure Leadership Institute at 541-737-4254.

Afterwards, stop by the OSUsed Store’s monthly Saturday sale at our store at 644 SW 13th Street (view on Google Maps). We are open every third Saturday of the month at 9 am – 12 pm. Learn more on Surplus Property’s website.

Categories: Ecologue

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