OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Campus Coalition Builders Our Story Continued

 

Welcoming Diversity . . . Valuing the Differences Among Us

This day-long workshop uses the award winning National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI) community building model. OSU's team of NCBI trained facilitators lead participants through a series of interactive exercises and conversations to assist them in identifying and understanding the impact of oppression and oppressive behaviors on themselves and others. Participants will be introduced to skills that can empower them to become more effective leaders and allies for others.

Intended outcomes for the Welcoming Diversity workshop

Participants will be:

• able to identify misinformation we have learned about others.

• able to identify and express pride in groups we belong to.

• able to learn how other groups experience mistreatment

• able to learn about the personal impact of incidents of discrimination.

• introduced to skills to help interrupt prejudicial remarks.

 

Team Training & Development Timeline

1997                 

OSU Division of Student Affairs “Campus Compact” conversation highlighted the need for initiation of a major program related to diversity/social justice. A small group/committee considered many different models/programs and finally landed on the National Coalition Builders model.  The major reasons for the selection included:

  •  
    • Everyone can participate as a leader.
    • Hope is an added element to the model.
    • The campus-specific element: the model could be managed at the campus level while receiving support from the national organization.

1999 (August)

Initial 3-Day Train-the-Trainer led by NCBI was attended by roughly 60 people.  From that initial training the chapter at OSU was started (with about 23 people) who were engaged in leading workshops as well as regular chapter meetings.  

2001 (September)

A second NCBI led Train-the-Trainer was hosted by OSU at Aldersgate Retreat Center.  Approximately 45 people from the western region (including California, Wyoming, Washington, and OSU) were originally in attendance. As 9/11 events unfolded, approximately 25 people committed to continue with the training while others felt it best for them to return home. This shared experience continues to bind CCB team members and their commitment to the work of human justice.

2001-Present     

Individuals interested in the NCBI model, who have been through the 1-day “Welcoming Diversity” program, have been supported to attend the 3 or 5-day national training hosted by NCBI, International in Maryland. Numerous individuals have taken advantage of the opportunity over the years and joined the campus team upon their return.

2012 (August)

OSU hosted a 3-day skill-building training with NCBI senior and trainers, Joyce Shabazz and Robert Dungey. Approximately 30 people attended the training.

2013 (November)

The OSU Campus Coalition NCBI conference photo 2013Builders became the first NCBI Campus Affiliate to host the annual campus conference for the second time, with NCBI campus teams coming to Corvallis from as far away as Alaska to Massachusetts and North Carolina.

2015 (June)

A repeat of the 2012, 3-day skill-building training with NCBI International senior trainers, Joyce Shabazz and Robert Dungey is planned for June 2015. Approximately 30 people who have formerly attended a one-day, Welcoming Diversity workshop will be invited to attend.

 

Lessons Learned

Over the years and through trial and tribulation, some core lessons have been acknowledged for the group regarding training people at OSU in the NCBI model:

  • Embrace storytelling, it is core to the model.
  • Adapt curriculum delivery to meet OSU culture and needs.
  • Gain deeper insights into Re-evaluation Counseling listening skills.
  • Begin by understanding the model first (through experience) before entering an NCBI International led training for leadership in the model.
  • Engage deeply with NCBI International

 

Comprehensive List of Engagements, 1999 to Present                                   

Class, Presentation, & Workshop Topics                                                                      

 

Advocacy and Coalition Building

Anywhere but Here: A history of housing discrimination in Oregon

Assessment Efforts of the OSU Chapter of NCBI                                                                          

Assessing to Improve Diversity Learning in a Student Affairs Service Project Class                                     

Best Practices Using the NCBI Prejudice Reduction Model

Building Community through Diversity: an introduction to the NCBI model

“Combined Destinies: Whites Sharing Grief about Racism”

Session 1: readings from the book & discussion with the authors

Session 2: author-led workshop exploring the subject

Eliciting Dialogue: a Strategy for Addressing Oppressive Comments

Get Creative. Get Started! Addressing Mental Health Issues on Campus

Holidays in a World of Difference                                                                                                         

How We Learned to Know What We Know                                                                                    

Justice for All: A Community Dialogue Honoring All Voices

Learn-Transform: The Power of the Personal Story                                                                  

Managing Challenging Conversations through Effective Facilitation

Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible film & discussion                                 

NCBI Welcoming Diversity 1-Day Workshop Assessment Data & Findings, a 10-year look

No Easy Road: Unlearning Discrimination in Oregon (display) & discussion

Race: the Power of an Illusion film, 3-part series                                                                      

Reaching Across Lines that Divide: Diversity Among Women at OSU!

Resolving Controversial Issues                                                                                                              

Shattering Mental Health-isms: Building Inclusive Communities (part 1 & 2)      

Strategies & Tools for Coalition Building to Address Mental Health Needs on Campus

Team and Ally Building                                                                                                                                 

The Diversity of Perspectives                                                                                                     

The Key to Men's Distress: Looking at Gender Privilege and Socialization

The Man Behind the Curtain: Helping College-age Men Achieve and Develop Healthy Gender Roles

Understanding Diversity & the Dimensions of Culture, 3-credit class                       

Understanding Community through Service and Coalition Building, 1-credit class

Understanding how Oppression Functions in Personal Activism

Unpacking Your Leadership Story

Unpacking Your Story

Unpacking Your Story for Men                                                               

Unpacking Your Story for Women

Welcoming Diversity: Valuing the Differences Among Us (prejudice reduction workshop)

Where there is Resistance, There is Hope!                                                                       


Partnering & Participating                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                                

Academy of Life-Long Learning.......................................... community adults

Alterra Assisted Living Facility..................................OSU students (class & service project)

Ambassadors for Agriculture.............................................        OSU students                                                          

Associated Students of OSU...............................................        OSU students                                                          

Beta Sigma Phi..................................................................        OSU students

Brookdale Assisted Living.................................................. OSU students (class & service project)                         

City of Albany Oregon............................................  middle/high school students, community

Clark College, Vancouver, WA............................ students/staff/faculty/university administration

College of Education.......................................................... OSU students (3-credit class)

Community Alliance for Diversity Study Circles.................. Community adults

Conference for Social Change..............................   OSU students, staff, faculty, community

Counseling & Psychological Services, OSU......................... partner       

Crook County Commission on Children & Families............. middle/high school students, police, counselors, teachers

Ethics in Diversity class..................................................... OSU students

Ethnic Studies class........................................................... OSU students                                                                

Greek Life IFC.................................................................... OSU Greek leaders

Linn-Benton Community College....................................... staff, faculty

MEChA    ............................................................................ OSU students

Transylvania exchange & hosts......................................... students: high school

MLK Day Celebrations..................OSU students, staff, faculty & community                                

National Orientation Director's Association....faculty                                                                                   

NW Regional Community College Student Leadership Conf       students

Odyssey Classes         .......................................................... OSU 1st year students, peer leaders, instructors   

Office Personnel Association, OSU..................................... OSU staff    

Oregon Institute of Technology.......................................... student leaders & advisors

OSU Administration........................................................... senior administrators & staff          

OSU campus & local area (individuals).............................. students, staff, faculty, community

OSU Cascades Campus...................................................... students, staff, faculty

OSU Management Association.......................................... professional faculty

OSU Women's Network (OWN)........................................... staff, faculty

Peace Jam Northwest....................................................... middle/high school students, advisors

Pluralistic Encouragement for a Community of Excellence Conference OSU students, staff, faculty, community

Polk County Youth Council................................................. students: high school

Portland State University NCBI Team (PSUnity).................. students, staff, faculty, university administrators

Recreational Sports, OSU.................................................. departmental staff                                                                                       

Social Change Conference, OSU......................................... students, staff, faculty, community                                

SMILE Program, OSU                                                                                               student mentors/leaders                                                                  

START Peer Leaders  .......................................................... OSU student

Student Affairs Staff Development Day.............................. division classified staff

Student Health Services, OSU............................................ OSU staff, faculty

University Housing & Dining, OSU                                                          OSU staff, faculty

Willamette University Residence Life............................... students, faculty

Women's Center...............................................................        Women’s Center student staff

 

 


Lunch & Learn Forum Topics 

 

African American and African Students Speak Out!

Battling Burnout

Being Transgendered: insight, issues & understanding

Brown Bags for White People, 3-part series

-        Boots of Lead: the immobilizing weight of guilt

-        White Guilt as an Effective Tool in Battling Racism: surely there must be a better way!

-        All sledge hammer Aside:  making the move from guilt to action!

Collusion, Grace & Privilege, 3-part series

- Colluding with Oppression

- Grace:  the Essential Gift!

- Understanding Invisible Privilege & Finding Ways to Combat It                                

Effective Skill Building Strategies: a follow up session for Welcoming Diversity, Valuing the Differences Among Us

Ethnic Notions (film & discussion)

Examining Ourselves: Uncovering Ageism & Adultism in Everyday Life

Growing Up Female

Understanding Indian Sovereignty

Insights on Jewish Issues and Culture

Intersections of Sexism & Racism

International Student Support

Making Men

Mental Health Issues for People of Color

No Dumb Questions (film & discussion on being transgendered)                                        

Ouch, that stereotype hurts, film & discussion

Pathways to Ending Mental Health Oppression

Paying the Price of Racism…is there a cost to White People?

Racism in Communities of Color: Self Reflection for the Ally

Religious Diversity

Scout's Honor (film & discussion)

Self Care Guided Imagery

Sugar and Spice, and Everything Nice….on Becoming a Woman

The Bible & Homosexuality

The Music Within (film & discussion)

U.S. Immigration Law and the Persistence of Racism

Understanding White Privilege: Making the Invisible…Visible!

Unpacking Your Leadership Story

Un-Packing Christian Privilege

Voices of Immigration (panel & discussion)

What does it take to be an effective ally?

 

 

Regional & National Organization Presentations 

 

American College Personnel Association (ACPA)                     

Association of College Unions International (ACUI)               

Metropolitan Diversity Institute                                                        

NASPA Assessment & Persistence Conference                         

NASPA Multicultural Institute                                                               

NCBI National Campus Conference                                                   

NCBI International Leadership for Diversity Institute

Oregon Diversity Institute                                                                       


Campus, Local & Regional Collaborations                   

 

Associated Students of OSU                                                                   

City of Albany Human Relations Commission                            

Counseling & Psychological Services, OSU                                   

Crook County Commission on Children & Families

Diversity Development, OSU                                                                 

Intercultural Student Services, OSU                                                 

MLK Day Planning Committee, OSU                                                  

Office of Community & Diversity, OSU                                             

Diversity Summits I & II, OSU                                                                                                                          

Polk County Youth Council                                                                       

Portland State University                                                                        

Team Liberation, OSU

School of Education, OSU

SOL People of Color Support Network, OSU                                  

SMILE Program, OSU                                                                                     

Washington State University                                                                

Women's Center, OSU                                                                                

Women's Studies, OSU                                                                               

 

 

Team Professional Development & Training                                                                

 

Chapter development with national leadership (5)                                                                      

Chapter semi-annual planning & learning retreats (18)                                                             

Managing Challenging Conversations through Effective Facilitations (21)

NCBI 3-Day Train the Trainer on campus (15)                                                                                      

NCBI 5-Day International Train the Trainer (2)                                                                                   

NCBI Annual Campus Conference host site (2007 & 2013))

NCBI International Associates Meetings (13)                                                                                     

NCBI National Campus Leadership Team (3)                                                                                       

NCBI national campus team development & leader support                                                 

NCBI national meetings (26)                                                                                                                           

NCBI Women's Constituency (8)                                                                                                                   

NCBI Men's Constituency (4)                                                                                                                           

NCBI LGBT Constituency (3)                                                                                                                             

NCBI European Heritage Constituency (2)                                                                                             

Portland State & OSU Campus Coalition Builders joint chapter development           

Portland State University Round Table on Diversity for Oregon Univ. System schools 

Re-Evaluation Counseling basics course (22)

 

Honors 

 

2010    Selected as a featured campus at the National NCBI Campus Conference at Emory University, best practices Campus Showcase presentation.

 

2012    CCB member Jodi Nelson, was recipient of the OSU Frances Dancy Hooks Coalition Award, which recognizes students, staff or faculty who exemplify Frances Dancy Hooks’ work: building bridges across cultures, showing courage in promoting diversity, and proudly “Walks the Talk.

 

2014    Recipient of the Division of Student Affairs Collaborative Group Award. This award was introduced in 2003 to honor a committee or group within the division that has functioned in a manner that models collaboration, energetic pursuit of a goal, positive relationship functioning, and is also one which has made a visible impact on the campus.  Read more – link to SOW

 

 

Why the NCBI Community-Building Model?:

 

How and why did you get involved in the NCBI Campus program?

 

The Division of Student Affairs Diversity Initiative group spent one year frozen in self doubt/not knowing what to do to begin, fearing that we weren’t “experts.” – couldn’t get past the “What can WE do mentality?”  Decided that in order to make a difference we must decide to be either a self-help group or do something for our community.  Since we were an initiative group, and wanted to be proactive, we opted for community and:

  • Looked for training program that was dynamic, ongoing, empowering, and interactive.
  • Seriously considered an ADL program & NCBI.
  • Researched via website; connected w/Texas campus much the size of our own; considered first-hand experiences of 2 members who had participated in an NCBI event, and made final decision for NCBI.

 

 

What do you do in NCBI that is different and unique from other practices outside of NCBI?

 

  • Offers hope.
  • NCBI goes beyond statements – it is experiential learning.
  • A method to live the passion & hope of the work -- it appeals to/is recognized by others who are looking for the same.
  • Empowers people with skills to take action -- NOW.
  • Relies on the passion, energy, commitment, and talents of all who want to move the work forward.
  • Provides strong framework to better understand others.
  • Integrates principles w/personal goals – learn to walk the talk.
  • Presents concrete tools to make a difference – transferable to all parts of life (home, professional, etc.)
  • Identifies and targets the root of all the “isms” – makes it understandable/commonalities/focus.
  • Lays a foundation for strong personal relationships that bring people together.
  • Provides safe learning environment = incremental changes have resulted in profound changes.
  • Relies on community based – grass roots energy.
  • Clearly models that every person has a role to play -- not just for those “experts” or those w/ a degree.
  • Acknowledges & provides a safe place for struggling/learning together.
  • Every person is an important piece, regardless of hierarchy.

 

 

What changes have you observed on campus (student/faculty/staff - overall environment) since your participation in NCBI?

 

  • People are hungry for this work, looking for someone to listen to and acknowledge them, hand off their hopelessness, and find hope.
  • People inspired to break down barriers, take positive risks.
  • Taking blinders off; can no longer deny/claim ignorance.
  • Increased awareness.
  • People looking at root of “isms” – shift in thinking from “what can we do” to “this is why we do it.”
  • People taking risks and moving to action.
  • Changes have been personal versus institutional – grass roots building foundation for change.
  • Culture shift – people getting into meaningful/understanding relationships & understanding the empowering effects of solid relationships.
  • Integration of NCBI principles into personal life result in changes in those around you, too.

 

 

How did the changes occur?

 

  • By always saying “yes” to requests for workshops/presentations/wherever can be of help on campus; “can do” attitude, and really believing we can make a difference (even though we may not always have all the answers).
  • Designed workshops/worked w/those requesting – met specific audience & needs (1 hour – 1 day).
  • Personal work – working on our own issues/facing ourselves and changes that we each need to make to grow.
  • Struggling together.
  • Re-evaluation Counseling basics course for 20 resulted in a) listening skills and understanding of how to more deeply engage with others; b) compelling growth in individuals and team’s ability to carry out the work.
  • Attending national leadership trainings, campus affiliate & director meetings. (compelling growth resulted – personal and team.)
  • Transferring learning/skills to workplace and personal lives.
  • Networking – people on campus are talking about/are interested in learning more about NCBI.
  • People outside the CCB team have noticed and been drawn to changes apparent in those doing NCBI work.
  • Always work and struggle together, never in isolation.
  • Increased understanding and confidence in the NCBI model.  That we are doing good work, that the model is proven & speaks for itself, and that our assessment tool will anchor significance and powerful nature of grass roots work in bringing about institutional/personal changes/shifts.

 

 

What did you learn from your participation in the NCBI Campus program?

 

  • One person can make a difference.
  • There is opportunity in every situation.
  • A skill set, a specific language enabling us to hear and interact in a new way, commit to those inside and out of NCBI.
  • Positive risk taking is an essential element of growth.
  • Passion and energy fuel the work.
  • Teams that believe in a vision and create effective relationships can help create space for change and culture shift.
  • New perspectives:  Anger = Hopelessness:  the NCBI philosophy and model provides an opportunity to reach out with hope.  No longer run from hopelessness – the result is a huge shift in behavior.
  • How to be different (more effective) with people in meetings/or one-on-one.
  • On-going support for individual and team-based learning goes hand-in-hand with moving the work forward.

 

 

Participant Comments & Kudos

 

“Friday night I witnessed a lapse in police work towards victims of violent crime. The following morning I stood in the cold talking with the watch commander on duty about the failure to perform as an officer in the appointment of his duties. I took this action directly because of the discussion I had in the coalition-building workshop at the Social Change Conference. “

 Student participant

 

 

“Thank you for organizing the NCBI experiences for my group.   I know that a few lives have truly been changed and I don’t think there is anyone who wasn’t touched by at least some part of the workshop. I appreciate the work so very much.”

College administrator

 

“Although some in our group struggled with the idea of ‘oppression’ as a personal issue, the overall experience was a good one, as we learned more about each other and bonded as a leadership team.  As a result we have built monthly meetings into our calendar to make sure we are taking care of each other as professionals. Thanks so much for pulling this together for us!”

University department director

 

 

“You rock! I have been hearing lots of discussion and buzz about the NCBI session all weekend! THANKS!!”

University program coordinator

 

“Thank you so much for coming to our class and presenting. I think that the class really benefited from the NCBI workshop and learned many new aspects of oppression and how, as leaders, they can make a difference. Thanks again for a great experience.”

University advisor

 

“I have to say that the workshop I attended with you folks this week was the best training I have been to in years.  Thanks to you and the team for your hard work to improve our world one person at a time.”

 

University customer service manager

 

 

“After this, I feel more understanding towards those that are different, and like I am not the only person that wants to work toward making the world a better place.

OSU student

 

More participant kudos, comments & reflections

 http://oregonstate.edu/studentaffairs/campus-coalition-builders-comments

 

 

 

 

Putting NCBI Skills to Work – members reflect

Student Conduct & Mediation Programs

 

In my position as coordinator for Student Conduct & Mediation Programs, I am primarily a listener, re-framer and a coach, rather than a judge.  The NCBI skills have aided me in placing myself in a more influential position, that is, to shift from a simple enforcement role to that of proactive support for a person’s success (especially young adults).  Sometimes, when the complainants are simply seeking vengeance, they can be frustrated by what appears to be a softer and less responsive intervention.  I believe this has also ultimately resulted in greater impact.

 

In general, I use NCBI learned listening skills on a daily basis.  Having learned how to look for and hear the hurt underneath the action, (the point of frustration), helps me empathize with students and faculty as people, and often brings clarity to my understanding of an incident.  I have a greater ability to be sensitive to the underlying issues and am able to be more proactive in my response towards the way they are feeling (vulnerable, at risk, etc.).

 

I often call on the same skills to be receptive to accused students and their feelings when handling situations such as disciplinary reviews.  My NCBI skills help manage the communications around controversial issues (whether it is frustration about Parking Services or Abortion Rights), and assist us in really hearing one another.  Generally, the results feel more satisfying to those involved than a simple legalistic finding of fault.

 

Following the November 2000 elections, I found the speak-out process particularly useful as we brought together the Gay, Lesbian, Bi-Sexual and Transgendered communities, and their allies in dialog. The After 9 Aftermath session was held in response to a ballot issue, Measure 9, which threatened the freedoms of the LGBT community in Oregon.  During the dialog, speak outs allowed people to vent their fears and feelings, and helped bring positive focus to the forwarding of personal and group issues.  It provided a place to find community and gather with allies, find and renew mutual support.

 

The learning I have done in the recognition and diffusion of leadership attacks continues to be very valuable to me.  It has emphasized the need to develop a supportive network or team of colleagues, in order to withstand these attacks.  It has also become more clear about the need to continuously support and appreciate others in leadership roles.

 

CCB member

Resolving Controversial Issues Process:  Residence Hall Racism Incident 

 

In the spring of 2000, a first generation Mexican international student was accosted by unidentified white male students.  As the international student was walking home from work he was hit on the shoulder by an object which appeared to have come from an open fourth floor window, where several male white students could be seen, heard yelling racial epitaphs, and behaving in a menacing way.  The perpetrators quickly retreated into their room when the student called up to them and asked why they were doing such a thing.  After an attempt to enter the locked residence hall to report the incident the student immediately contacted the campus police, the student conduct officer, and the University Housing administrative office.  An investigation was launched and questioning of all residents failed to clearly identify the perpetrators. 

 

As news of the circulated throughout the campus, uproar from the underrepresented population and supporters arose, and several small demonstrations took place.  Accusations flew as University Housing was criticized for not doing enough to identify the culprits.  Residents of the hall were targeted as racists for not being able, or willing, to identify the offenders.  Most residents declared no knowledge of the incident, but received harassing phone calls, and felt threatened and unfairly labeled for the aggression showed by a few unidentified students.  Some even questioned whether the incident had actually happened.  The ensuing arguments set the campus awash in a flurry of hateful rhetoric with people taking up sides on the issue.

 

The training in prejudice reduction and controversial issues process we received through NCBI seemed like the perfect vehicle to offer for use to help the OSU community work through and gain clarity around these issues.  We contacted the victim, expressed our deep sense of sorrow, and listened to him, being careful to offer continued support and belief in him. 

 

As a result, the director of residential life and the hall and floor we met with the hall directors and were able to help them work through some of the issues using NCBI conflict resolution tools. 

 

We participated in an open forum where emotions ran high and were able to encourage and model listening to one another in a respectful way.  We also contacted the housing administration and the student conduct officer, the residence hall and floor directors, and offered our support and our facilitation skills for discussions for controversial issues and or in prejudice situations.  Additionally, we met individually with the hall director and fourth floor manager and spent time listening to their stories and offering support.  The resulting relationship has allowed them to confidently call upon us to help work through difficult issues, as well as being invited to present diversity training programs in the halls on an on-going basis.

 

CCB member

 

Resolving Controversial Issues Process:  Women’s Center & Greek Life 

 

The Women's Center called on the Campus Coalition Builders to facilitate a conversation could come and facilitate a conversation between the Greek community and the Women's Center.  Having been trained in the NCBI Resolving Controversial Issues model I have a position/title at the University not classically thought of to assume the role of facilitator.  Although not totally confident in my new-found skills I was bolstered by the confidence others had in me- and within the hour made my way across campus to the Women's Center to facilitate a discussion. A controversy had arisen on campus between women's rights advocates and the sororities over the sororities choice of program for the annual Sorority Sing Program "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas".   Disputes arose as advertising for the program involving signage and caricatures of Prostitutes where put in sorority windows advertising the sing.  Women from the community, the Rape Awareness group, and Safe Ride began calling the women's center and sororities with complaints about how degrading these displays were to women.  The dispute escalated when several threatening calls were received by the sorority and when some unidentified women showed up at the "IFC Sing" practice and behaved in a menacing way toward the sorority performers.  There were harsh feelings on each side of the debate.  At the women's center 6-8 concerned women gathered and invited IFC leaders to the discussion.  However, along with the IFC leaders - over 35 additional Greek students male and female arrived.

 

I was not prepared for the vehemence coming from the groups and was unaware of the threats or menacing behavior that had caused fear for some of the sorority students. Thank goodness for my NCBI training, as without it I would have been ill-prepared to handle this situation.

 

As I was taught in NCBI to begin a controversial discussion by setting grounds rules. With the groups participation I set up guidelines and gained agreement from all who would participate to follow in order to have this conversation turn out. Such things as – use good listening skills, no interruptions, no slams or zingers or put downs allowed, and mutual respect.  I then set up the conversation by saying – “On the one hand we have a group of women who are concerned that the choice of program and the advertising for that program is degrading and harmful to women on the other hand we have members of the IFC saying their choice of program’s is a widely acclaimed comedy musical, which is for fun and not meant to be taken seriously”.  I gave time for members of each group to say what they understood to be their main points of contention.

 

Several IFC members stood and talked about all the weeks of hard work that they had put into this musical, and that it was meant to be comical, not for people to take this so seriously, that their detractors needed to “lighten up”. They relayed how painful it was to have people calling the sorority with threats and how terrifying it was to have people physically threaten and intimidate them at the practices – when all they wanted to do was have a fun and entertaining time. 

 

Several members of the Women’s group stood and said how demeaning it felt to have women portrayed as prostitutes. Others talked about personal experiences with rape and how they feared that because of the provocative sexual content of the musical and advertising it would further help create the climate on campus that women are sexual objects and they “wanted it” inviting rape.

 

During this time the conversation became very heated and I had to step in a few times to remind the group about the ground rules they had agreed upon to have this conversation turn out. In closing I asked for two volunteers from each group to come up and take turns summarizing what their groups view was- I asked the person listening to suspend all judgment and just listen to that person's story, and then to repeat what they understood them to say.

 

This is a very effective way of getting people to really listen to another’s concerns and find a way to meet the needs of both groups.

 

Because equal time was given for individuals to speak out about their concerns the group quieted down and each side felt good about sending representatives from each group to a “What Now” session. At which the leaders met and came up with a way to have fun and entertaining programs that were not degrading to women.

CCB member

 

 

 

How NCBI Has Touched My Life

I have a colleague who has been extensively involved in the NCBI training offered at Oregon State University.  Because this colleague is also a personal friend, we have served as each other’s confidant for personal as well as professional issues, and have “mentored” each other during the course of many years.

The personal growth that my friend has experienced is impossible to overlook.  I have often commented that she responds to situations differently than she might have in the past, and I’ve often quizzed her on the source of her growth.  She attributes the majority of her personal development to the training she has received through NCBI, and has become an informal “tutor” to me.  As a result, I notice my own personal development beginning to escalate.

Recently, a young woman who is very dear to me called and stated that she had lost all hope of winning her battle with a serious eating disorder.  Her health has declined to the point that her body is losing the ability to digest food, and she is aware of the life-threatening implications of this.  Battling my own sense of panic, I remembered discussions with my NCBI “tutor” about the value of listening and providing a safe context within which an individual becomes free to confront his/her issues.  As the conversation continued, it became obvious that the eating disorder was not related to “food”, but rather to personal issues that have long remained buried.  My “tutor” and I have often talked of the need to take risks if we are to grow, and I encouraged this young woman to consider the freedom that might be gained by facing her issues.

The conversation continued for a prolonged time, but at the end, the hopelessness she was experiencing was, for the moment, gone.  She was excited about the idea of taking small steps towards aligning her “outward” and “inward” selves; she was ready to face the “battle” again. 

I believe that without the conversations about aspects of NCBI that I have had with my colleague, my own reactions to a very difficult conversation with the young woman would have been markedly different, and far less effective.  The idea that the “world can be changed one person at a time” is a grand concept, and one which I embrace.  I’m grateful that NCBI training has had the power to influence my behaviors, although I have never been involved in a training session.  I think that, alone, testifies to the power of the values that underlie NCBI.

Non-NCBI trained individual