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Updated: 45 weeks 1 day ago

OSU Vet Med dean accepts job on East Coast

Thu, 07/18/2013 - 3:17pm
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CORVALLIS, Ore. – Cyril Clarke, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University since May of 2007, announced his resignation on Thursday to accept a position on the East Coast.

Clarke will become dean of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine effective Oct. 1.

Sabah Randhawa, OSU provost and executive vice president, praised Clarke for his leadership in growing the state’s only veterinary program.

“His leadership has enabled the College of Veterinary Medicine to grow the veterinary teaching hospital, increase the research infrastructure, expand the college’s partnership with the Oregon Humane Society, and advance collaborative research and graduate education initiatives in the Division of Health Sciences,” Randhawa said. “We wish him the best in the next phase of his career.”

During Clarke’s tenure as dean, the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine also went through a $12 million expansion of Magruder Hall, increased its student enrollment and faculty, and significantly expanded the Veterinary Teaching Hospital clinical service.

Randhawa said he would appoint an interim dean during the next several weeks and launch a national search for Clarke’s replacement.

Clarke, who was educated in South Africa, spent 20 years at Oklahoma State University prior to coming to Oregon State.

College of Veterinary Medicine Media Contact:  Mark Floyd Source: 

Sabah Randhawa, 541-737-2111

Cyril Clarke, 541-737-0811

Categories: Research news

OSU student discovers floating tsunami dock on video one year later…

Thu, 07/18/2013 - 2:47pm
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A year after a cement dock from Japan washed ashore near Newport, Ore., an Oregon State University graduate student discovered video of the dock floating by Yaquina Head.

NEWPORT, Ore. – Oregon State University graduate student Cheryl Horton was meticulously scanning year-old video of a bird colony off Yaquina Head near Newport, Ore., last month when she noticed a strange object drifting by in the background.

Closer examination confirmed that the grainy, distant floating object captured on her research camera was the dock that washed ashore at Agate Beach in early June of 2012, some 15 months after a devastating earthquake and tsunami ripped it loose from its mooring in Misawa, Japan. In the weeks after it landed on the Oregon beach, the cement dock became a tourist attraction and drew attention from news media worldwide.

Her discovery came one year almost to the day that the dock landed on Agate Beach, bringing mystique – and potentially invasive species – to Oregon from Japan. It is the only known video of the dock during its trans-Pacific Ocean journey. It can be viewed at: http://bit.ly/112zAzb

“We’ve been behind analyzing our footage and had gone through video of common murre colonies at Cape Meares in the north and Coquille Point in the south,” said Horton, a master’s candidate in fisheries and wildlife at OSU. “But we got so busy that we didn’t get around to looking at the central coast data until this June. Then it was, ‘whoa – what is that?’”

“That” was the dock, which measured seven feet tall, was some 19 feet wide by 66 feet long, and weighed an estimated 188 tons. On camera, floating in the water, it looks much smaller – almost like a log. It takes about three minutes for the concrete dock to drift past the camera, slowly riding the current from north to south.

The discovery is more of a curiosity than anything, though OSU researchers have examined the video for clues that may tell them a bit more about the direction and speed the dock may have traveled – at least in the days before it beached.

Horton is sharing the video with others and is again focusing on her research on common murres, a species that increasingly is being preyed upon by bald eagles along the Oregon coast, as well as by “secondary” predators including gulls and pelicans.

“It was kind of fun to discover the dock video and share it with others,” she said. “Everyone has been pretty excited about it.”

A portion of the dock is on display at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, where Horton and major professor Rob Suryan are based. Horton also is mentored by Katie Dugger, another fisheries and wildlife faculty member on the OSU campus.

Horton is the second fisheries and wildlife student in recent years to make an accidental scientific discovery via camera.  In 2008, graduate student Katie Moriarty captured an image of a rare wolverine on camera in the Tahoe National Forest. It was the first sighting of a wolverine in California in nearly 75 years.

Hatfield Marine Science Center Media Contact:  Mark Floyd Source: 

Cheryl Horton, 845-548-2187; hortonc@onid.orst.edu

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Cheryl Horton

 

Link to Video:

http://bit.ly/112zAzb

Categories: Research news

OSU hotline opens for food preservation questions

Wed, 07/17/2013 - 8:22am
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CORVALLIS, Ore. – As interest grows in preserving produce, the Oregon State University Extension Service is offering its summer food preservation and safety hotline for queries on testing pressure canner gauges, ensuring jam sets properly and preparing tomato salsa.

The hotline at 1-800-354-7319 runs 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from July 15 to Oct. 11.

Extension-certified Master Food Preserver volunteers from Lane and Douglas counties take the calls.

More young people ages 25-40 are becoming are interested in local food and taking OSU Extension's Master Food Preserver training, said Nellie Oehler, the master food preserver coordinator in Lane County.  

"There's a whole new generation coming up that wants to know how we did it in the old days and wants to go back to the land and back to the basics," she said.

Oehler emphasized that proper techniques must be used to ensure canned foods are high quality and safe to eat. The hotline is one of several resources, including publications and classes, which OSU Extension offers on food safety.

Master Food Preservers who staff the hotline must undergo 40 hours of training. They educate the public about safe food handling and preservation over the phone and at workshops and exhibits. Last year, 374 new and veteran master food preservers throughout the state contributed 23,150 volunteer hours.

Master Food Preservers answered 3,425 calls during the 2012 summer season. About 80 percent dealt with food safety questions, Oehler said.

For more information about the Master Food Preserver Program, go to http://bit.ly/OSU_FoodPreservation and http://extension.oregonstate.edu/fch/food-safety. OSU Extension's Ask an Expert service also takes online questions about food preservation at http://bit.ly/OSU_AskAnExpert. Additionally, Master Food Preservers run a holiday food safety hotline every November. 

Extension Service Media Contact:  Denise Ruttan Source: 

Nellie Oehler, 541-868-6897

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Michele Pryse, a master food preserver trained by the Oregon State University Extension Service, teaches food preservation techniques in the Medford area. (Photo by Lynn Ketchum.)

Categories: Research news

Stone named head of engineering school

Tue, 07/16/2013 - 3:45pm
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Rob Stone will become the permanent head of the School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering in the OSU College of Engineering.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Rob Stone, a professor in the College of Engineering at Oregon State University, will lead its School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering after serving as the interim head.

Stone will manage one of the largest engineering schools at OSU, which includes 1,600 undergraduate students, 200 graduate students, 38 full-time faculty and 14 full-time staff.

“Rob is committed to excellence in our academic programs, our research programs, our faculty and students,” said Sandra Woods, dean of OSU’s College of Engineering. “His commitment to OSU and to collaboration is a great benefit to the college and to OSU during this extraordinary period of growth.”  

Stone conducts research in the area of design theory and methodology, design knowledge archival, automated design concept generation, and biologically-inspired engineering design. He earned his doctorate in mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin in 1997 and joined the faculty at OSU in 2009.

College of Engineering Media Contact: 

Thuy Tran, 541-737-6020

Source: 

Sandra Woods, 541-737-3601

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Rob Stone

Categories: Research news

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