OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

A Re-examination of the Roles of President Roosevelt and the Showa Emperor in the Attack of Pearl Harbor

TitleA Re-examination of the Roles of President Roosevelt and the Showa Emperor in the Attack of Pearl Harbor
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsGrunow, Tristan R.
Academic DepartmentHistory
Thesis AdvisorIp, Dr. Hung-Yok
DegreeBachelor of Arts in International Studies in History
Number of Pages102
Date Published06/2005
UniversityOregon Satte University
CityCorvallis
Thesis TypeUndergraduate
KeywordsPearl Harbor, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, prior knowledge
Abstract

Two of the biggest debates emanating from World War I1 -the debate concerning President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's knowledge of the attacks on Pearl Harbor, and the debate on how much war responsibility should be placed on the Japanese Showa Emperor, Hirohito -cross roads concerning the Japanese attacks on the military installations at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7'h, 1941, and provide the basis for a very interesting examination.
This thesis compares the roles played by President Roosevelt and the Showa Emperor in the attack on Pearl Harbor. This is done, first, by examining claims that Roosevelt had foreknowledge of the attack, and withheld information from the military installations at Hawaii to insure that the attack would take place. Secondly, this thesis determines how much influence Hirohito played in the final decision to attack Pearl Harbor and begin the Asia-Pacific War, by analyzing documents gathered by the author.
After reviewing research collected on both topics, this project concludes that the conventional wisdom concerning each individual's role in the attack is erroneous. Evidence gathered by the author shows that President Franklin Roosevelt provoked Japan to attack the United States, had foreknowledge of the attack, and then covered up his actions. Also, additional evidence shows that Emperor Hirohito was not just a figurehead ruler, was actively involved in the planning and strategizing of military maneuvers, and then received cooperative protection from both the American government and the Japanese government following World War II.