OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Cross-Cultural Medicine: Overcoming the Barriers for Latinas in the U.S. and Indigenous Women in Mexico.

TitleCross-Cultural Medicine: Overcoming the Barriers for Latinas in the U.S. and Indigenous Women in Mexico.
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication1998
AuthorsSandstrom, Kimberly S.
Academic DepartmentMicrobiology
Thesis AdvisorHruby, Dennis E
DegreeBachelor of Arts in International Studies in Microbiology
Number of Pages22
Date Published03/1998
UniversityOregon State University
CityCorvallis
Thesis TypeUndergraduate
Keywordsbilingual, cultural, linguistic, Mexico, sexually transmitted diseases
Abstract

Some of the socioeconomic, cultural, and linguistic factors that affect the health of indigenous women in Mexico and Hispanic women in the United States are explored through an analysis of the prevalence of five sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, cervical infection with human papilloma virus, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The historical and religious backgrounds of native Mexicans and Latinas in the U.S. provide insight into their perceptions of the mainstream health care systems in both nations, and linguistic preferences are shown to influence access to health care. Both groups of women are disproportionately affected by all five STDs. Thus, educational and health care programs should target them using culturally sensitive techniques. By incorporating bilingual and bicultural peer educators and health care providers, understanding the influence of traditional medicine, and promoting cultural awareness, medical programs can more effectively reach these marginalized groups.