International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS)

International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS) is the central campus resource for hosting international visitors and/or hiring international employees, advising international scholars & faculty on visa and immigration issues, and providing resources to faculty and staff preparing to travel on behalf of OSU.  Oregon State welcomes international scholars and faculty to teach, conduct research, and collaborate with colleagues on its campuses and hosts approximately 500 faculty and scholars from as many as 50 different countries each year.

International Scholars

This page lists resources for specific ISFS populations. Exchange Visitors and dependents, OSU employees, OSU department sponsors, and community members can find information sprcific to their needs. You will find general information and requirements of the visa type, along with where to look for open positions or opportunities.

Exchange Visitors in Research Scholar Category (J-1)

Postdocs (J-1 or H1-B)

Guest Lecturer (B-1)

Student Interns (J-1)

Dependent Family Members (J-2)

Employees (H1-B)

Faculty and Administrators/Sponsoring Professor or Department

Community Members and Supporters

Prospective Scholars

Oregon State University (OSU) welcomes international faculty and scholars to teach, conduct research, and collaborate with colleagues at locations throughout Oregon. During an academic year, OSU hosts approximately 450 faculty and scholars from as many as 50 different countries.

International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) works cooperatively with academic departments and the Office of Academic Affairs in hiring and supporting international scholars and faculty. ISFS staff prepares visa documents and advises on immigration (USCIS and DOS) matters for nonimmigrant post-doctoral positions, research assistants, and other faculty and scholar appointments.

Scholars interested in coming to Oregon State University, must first secure a sponsoring department.  The sponsoring department will then contact ISFS to determine visa category and to receive application forms.

Resources to find a Sponsor or Position at OSU

Academic Majors at Oregon State University

The links below will direct you to a listing of the academic majors at OSU. Each program link will list the OSU campus (Corvallis, Cascade, or other), courese offered in the program, and additional information.

College Directories

Below is a list of colleges and programs at Oregon State University. You may search the college directories for the  "Faculty and Staff" or "Faculty Research" section to find potential department sponsors and faculty contact information.

Information for Specific Prospective Scholar Populations

Below is a list of resources for specific scholar populations. Prospective scholars can find links to information on scholar categories, open job postings, and application materials relevant to the type of position they seek: Research Scholar, Professor, Postdoc, Guest Lecturer, Student Intern, Employee, Dependent Family Members, and more.

General Campus Visitors

Guest Lecturer (B-1)

Professionals

Employees (H1-B, TN, E-3)

Exchange Visitors in Research Scholar Category (J-1)

Students or Recent Graduates

Postdocs

Student Interns (J-1)

Family Members

Dependent Family Members (J-2, H-4, E-3D, TD, or other options)

Why OSU?

Working for OSU

Why work for Oregon State University? We'll offer three good reasons: people, place and community. Our faculty and staff are know for their collaborative spirit and innovation, our students are passionate problem solvers and our alumni are bursting with Beaver pride. Our main campus in Corvallis is a thriving college town is centrally located, tucked between the Coast Range and the lush farmland of the Willamette Valley with easy access to the Oregon Coast, Portland and the outdoor wonderland of the Cascade Mountains. At Oregon State University, in Corvallis and around the state you'll find a caring community with a commitment to making a difference.

Our faculty and staff tell you in their own words why they love working for the university and living in Oregon.

  1. Working at OSU
  2. Living in Corvallis
  3. Being an Oregonian
Working at OSU

We asked our staff and faculty to list their favorite things about working at OSU, and here are the ten most common responses, given in their own words:

  • Cross-disciplinary collaboration
  • Beautiful campus
  • Support and resources
  • Motivated and inspiring students
  • Sense of community
  • Recognition for hard-working staff
  • Having colleagues that want to have fun while they work
  • Collegial atmosphere
  • Friendly people
  • Vibrant atmosphere
Living in Corvallis

We asked our staff and faculty what they love most about living in Corvallis or the Willamette Valley, and here's what they said:

  • Beautiful scenery
  • Biking anywhere in town
  • Access to outdoor activities
  • Family friendly
  • Great wineries and breweries
  • Only one or two hours away from everything
  • Downtown and the riverfront
  • Classic college town
  • Amazing parks
  • Small town feeling with bigger cultural events

oregon

If you can judge a place by the number of exclamation points you find in a survey like this, then Oregon is a world leader in just about everything! But we'll limit it to ten representative responses, given in their own words:

  • Oregonians embrace the land and live life to fullest.
  • The scenery! I cant get enough of the beauty here.
  • The culture of high quality, locally made food, beer, wine, etc.
  • Oregonians care about people.
  • No sales tax.
  • I love that I can go snowboarding and lay on the beach in the same day.
  • So much to do!
  • Well, I love the rain!
  • I love being part of a community where everyone is so proud to be from here.
  • I love that everyone here seems so friendly and polite.

More Reasons to work with Oregon State

About OSU

We welcome you to learn more about Oregon State University. The main campus in located in the Corvallis, Oregon community but OSU also has Extension Service locations all over Oregon State. Corvallis is nestled in the heart of Oregon's Willamette Valley, within 90 minutes of the Portland Metropolitan area, the Cascade Mountains, and the spectacular Oregon coast. Corvallis has a residential population of 55,345 and is home to Oregon State University.

About OSU

About Corvallis

Getting Oriented

Get oriented to Oregon State University and the Corvallis area with the following maps. Print the maps prior to arrival in Oregon.

Learn more about OSU & Corvallis

OSU Extension Services and Other Locations

The Oregon State University Extension Service celebrates over 100 years of educational outreach in various locations across Oregon state. International scholars and faculty are welcome to find a sponsor at any Oregon State University location across Oregon.

Tips to Secure a Sponsoring Professor

Prospective international scholars seeking to research or intern at Oregon State first need to secure a sponsoring department at OSU. The sponsoring department will then contact International Scholars and Faculty Services (ISFS) to determine the visa category and to receive application forms.

Scholars interested in employment type positions (H-1B, TN, E-3 visa types) are required to apply through Human Resources employment opportunities.

Research and Planning

  1. Start thinking about potential sponsors now. It may take some time to find a sponsoring professor, complete the application paperwork, and for visa processing and security checks. ISFS recommends that scholars start looking for a sponsor 3 to 6 months before their expected program start date.
  2. Make a list of potential sponsors. Start looking at Academic Colleges and Majors at OSU that are related to your research focus, major, or specialization. Most department websites will have information on current research projects, position openings, and listing of current scholars or faculty.
  3. Reach out to current scholars. Does your department of interest already have international scholars? Reach out to them to learn about their experiences, feedback, and advice. Connect on the OSU Scholar facebook page.
  4. Network. Do you have, or does your current institution have any personal connections or programs with OSU? Do you have a personal contact at OSU who can help pass your request and application on to the potential sponsor? Some foreign institutions or universities already have partnership programs or agreements set up. Research if any organizations you belong to have any ties or agreements (university, professional organization, employment). OSU International Agreements.
  5. Create a list of potential sponsors and do your research. You should focus your list to include people who will actually consider your sponsorship request. Gather background information on the potential sponsor and develop a statement of how you can benefit each other. 
  6. Review the Checklist of What to Ask a Potential Sponsoring Department and prepare what questions you want to ask (National Postdoctoral Association).

Drafting an Email to a Potential Sponsoring Professor/Department

  1. Introduction and Summary. Introduce yourself and summarize the main points of your request. Describe your background and accomplishments, why you are seeking sponsorship, how being a sponsor will benefit them, your funding situation, the dates of your requested program, and what you are requesting (sponsorship for the U.S. visa). Include the dates of any deadlines. Keep the introduction email short but attach a link to your website, social media, ore research publications so the potential sponsor can easily access your information.
  2. Attach your Resume or Curriculum Vitae. These documents will be required as part of the application and give your sponsor a better understanding of your background and experience.
  3. Outline your basic learning plan or research goals. State what you plan to do at OSU, how your research aligns with theirs, and if you are flexible to changing your learning plan. You may want to include information about if you would like to enroll in English courses, attend conferences, or require an office space. Be flexible as departments may be limited on funding, space, and projects.
  4. Funding. State if you already have funding or if you are requesting financial sponsorship as well. Proof of financial support may be required for the final application.
  5. Immigration documents. You may also want to attach a PDF of image of your current passport. If you are currently in the United States, or have been in the U.S. anytime during the last 24 months, include any documents which explain your current or past status (U.S. visa stamp, DS-2019 or I-20, I-94, or Employment Authorization Document). This will clarify your current immigration status, employment eligibility, and visa type.
  6. Keep your request clear. Questions relating to visa type, bringing dependents (spouse or child), orientation information, or other general questions can be addressed later or during the application phase unless essential in your request.
  7. Direct sponsors to contact International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS). Please include this as one of your final statements "If you are interested in hosting me as a visiting scholar, I was informed that the next step is for the sponsoring department to contact the International Scholar and Faculty Service (ISFS) office at Oregon State University to determine the visa type and to obtain the application materials. Their office email is ISFS.Advisor@oregonstate.edu".
  8. Personalize each email with the name and information of the potential sponsor. Departments may delete the email if they see it is a bulk email (one email set to all prospective sponsors) or one that is not personalized or clear in the request.
  9. Thank your sponsor for taking the time to read through your email and consider your request.
  10. Read and re-read your email before sending! Make sure all documents are attached, readable in English, and that your request is understandable.
  11. Send your request! Have confidence in your request and if you don't succeed the first time, then just try again. If you receive a denial, ask if the sponsor has any other leads on departments or contacts that they can forward your request.

Obtaining Sponsorship

  1. Thank your sponsor. If you secured a sponsor at OSU then congratulations! Make sure you thank your sponsor for taking the time to review your application and sponsor you since it is an additional time commitment for them.
  2. Continue to do your research so you are prepared for your visa interview and your arrival at OSU. Pre-arrival information. New Scholar Orientation.
  3. Followup. The sponsoring department and ISFS will be in contact with you about any followup questions, the application paperwork, and procedures.

Incoming Scholars

Congratulations on your acceptance to Oregon State University! This section gives pre-arrival information for new and incoming scholars, faculty, and department sponsors.

As a sponsor of the Exchange Visitor Program (the program that oversees J visa types), Oregon State University must provide pre-arrival information to J-visa Exchange Visitors on topics that prepare scholars for their program at Oregon State.

Pre-Arrival Information

Current Scholar Orientation

Purpose of Exchange Visitor Program

The Exchange Visitor Program (J-visa types)  provides countless opportunities for international candidates looking to travel and gain experience in the United States. The multifaceted programs enable foreign nationals to come to the U.S. to teach, study, conduct research, demonstrate special skills or receive on the job training for periods ranging from a few weeks to several years.

The general purpose of the Exchange Visitor Program is to promote international educational and cultural exchange to develop mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries. As a non-immigrant visa type, all exchange visitors are expected to return to their home country upon completion of their program in order to share their exchange experiences.

Program Categories

The J-1 visa has different categories of Exchange Visitors; each category has different expectations and regulations that must be followed. Follow the links to learn more about program information, qualifications, and expectations. 

At Oregon State University, there are several types of J-1 Exchange Visitor categories:

Program Expectations

Each category of the Exchange Visitor program has different expectations that the participants must follow. For a brief overview, select your program category type from the Exchange Visitor Program website.

212(e) Home Country Presence Requirement

The two-year home country physical presence requirement is one of the most important requirements of Exchange Visitor status (J visa types).  The two-year home residency requirement is different and separate from the 24-month bar on repeat participationOnly some J exchange visitors and their dependents are subject to the 212(e).

When you agree to participate in an Exchange Visitor Program and your program falls under the conditions explained below, you will be subject to the two-year home-country physical presence (foreign residence) requirement. This means you will be required to return to your home country for two years at the end of your exchange visitor program. This requirement under immigration law is based on Section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Two-year Home-country Physical Presence Requirement Conditions

An exchange visitor is subject to the two-year home-country physical presence requirement if the following conditions exist:

  • Government funded exchange program - The program in which the exchange visitor was participating was financed in whole or in part directly or indirectly by the U.S. government or the government of the exchange visitor's nationality or last residence;
  • Graduate medical education or training - The exchange visitor entered the United States to receive graduate medical education or training;
  • Specialized knowledge or skill: Skills List - The exchange visitor is a national or permanent resident of a country which has deemed the field of specialized knowledge or skill necessary to the development of the country, as shown on the Exchange Visitor Skills List. Review the Exchange Visitor Skills List 2009.

An exchange visitor who falls into one of these groups will continue to be subject, even if funding or field of study changes. If the principal J-1 exchange visitor is subject to the two-year residence requirement, dependents in J-2 status are subject as well.

Restrictions

When you, as an exchange visitor are subject to the two-year home-country physical presence requirement, you must return to your home country for a cumulative total period of at least two years before you can do any of the following:

  • Change status while in the United States to the nonimmigrant categories of temporary worker (H) or intracompany transferee (L);
  • Adjust status while in the United States to immigrant visa/lawful permanent resident status (LPR);
  • Receive an immigrant visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate; or
  • Receive a temporary worker (H), intracompany transferee (L), or fiancé (K) visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

What does it mean to be subject to the 212(e)?

Exchange Visitors who are subject to the two-year residence requirement must “reside and be physically present” in their "home" country for an aggregate of two years before being eligible for certain immigration benefits. 

Note that former exchange visitors are eligible for all other nonimmigrant visa types, even if subject to the two-year residence requirement; Only lawful permanent residence (PR), H and L visas, are prohibited.

Exchange visitors subject to the two-year residence requirement are eligible to leave the U.S. and apply for visas to return as tourists, or as F-1 students. The usual visa requirements must be met.

Persons with a two-year residence requirement are eligible for program transfers and extension of their J status up to the limits of time for their particular exchange visitor category unless they have previously applied for a waiver of the 212(e).

Waiver of Two Year Home-Country Physical Presence Requirement

If you are not able to fulfill the home country presence requirement, you may be able to apply for a waiver. Select Waiver of the Exchange Visitor Two-Year Home-Country Physical Presence Requirement to learn more about this requirement and how to request a waiver.

An exchange visitor may request that the two-year home residence requirement be waived only on the following basis:

  1. Statement from the exchange visitor's home country that it has no objection to the waiver;
  2. Request for waiver made by an interested U.S. government agency;
  3. Interest of a state agency (only for alien physicians);
  4. Exceptional hardship to the U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse or child of the exchange visitor;
  5. Fear of persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion.

If the State Department recommends a waiver of the two-year foreign residence requirement, the exchange visitor cannot extend his or her program beyond the expiration date of the current DS-2019 form or transfer to another Exchange Visitor program.

Additional Resources

Travel to the U.S. and Oregon

Information for When You Arrive in Oregon

Welcome to the United States! This page has information for scholars first arriving in the United States and transportation options for getting to your final destination in Oregon.

 

Making Travel Plans

Important things to remember when booking your incoming flight to the US:

  • Book your flight after your US visa is confirmed.
  • J visa holders may not enter the US more than 30 days prior to the program start date listed on their DS-2019 (Box #3).
  • The nearest airports to the Corvallis campus are Portland International Airport (PDX) and Eugene Airport (EUG).
    • The Portland Airport is a large international airport with many international flights and is approximately 1.5 hours from Corvallis.
    • The Eugene Airport is a small airport with only a few domestic flights available and is approximately 1 hour from Corvallis. From either airport, you can arrange transportation to Corvallis.
  • If you are located at an Extension Service location which is not on the Corvallis campus, contact your sponsor for information about the closest airport and transportation options.
  • Inform the ISFS office and your sponsor of your arrival and schedule your attendance for the mandatory check-in and orientation meeting. Scholars not on the Corvallis campus may check-in remotely.
  • If you cannot attend by the Program Start Date on your DS-2019, contact ISFS immediately.
  • Some programs are not located on the Corvallis campus but may be in other locations in Oregon at OSU extension locations. Check with your sponsor on location and remote check-in process.

Important things to remember when booking your return flight out of the US:

  • J visa holders have a 30 day grace period following the Program End Date on the DS-2019 or the completion of the program (whichever comes sooner) to prepare to depart the US.
  • After the J-1 scholar's program has completed and the scholars leaves the US during the grace period, scholars will not be able to reenter the US on an expired DS-2019 or J visa. If you plan to travel in and out of America following your J program you may need to apply for a visitor visa or Visa Waiver Program in order to reenter the US.
  • J-2 dependents may not stay in the US after the primary J-1 scholar departs.

 

Getting to OSU

You will need to arrange transportation to Corvallis.

To get to and from the Portland Airport

  • Hut Shuttle (from Portland): The Hut Shuttle is a comfortable, convenient way of getting to and from PDX. This shuttle bus leaves Corvallis almost every two hours, every day of the week.
  • Omni Shuttle (from Eugene): The Omni Shuttle will transport you from the Eugene airport to Corvallis.
  • Taxi: You may take a taxi cab from the airport but it may be expensive.  
  • Car Rental: Most rental companies allow visitors to rent a car at the Portland or Eugene Airport and return the car to their office in Corvallis. Reservations can be made online with a credit card and a valid driver’s license (see the “transportation” section for more information about driver’s licenses). You will also be required to purchase temporary auto insurance at the car rental agency. Rental companies at the Portland Airport. Rental companies at the Eugene Airport.
  • Bus or Train: Greyhound bus and Amtrack train also has service from the airport but you may have to take the light rail system (MAX) or the public bus system (TriMet) from Portland, or shuttle or taxi from the Eugene Airport to the bus or train station.

 

Entering the U.S. Border

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP): CBP  is part of the Department of Homeland Security and is responsible for securing the border and facilitating lawful international trade, travel, and U.S. laws and regulations- including immigration.

Housing Resources

Finding Housing

Housing is a primary concern for anyone coming to a new place.  Here you will find links to resources and descriptions of common types of housing and housing-related terminology.

On-Campus | Short-Term | Long-Term | Housing Types | Housing Terminology

 

On Campus Housing

OSU  offers a limited amount of on-campus housing for visiting scholars.  Visit the University Housing & Dining (UHDS) Scholar Housing Program website for more information.

 

Short-Term Housing

Corvallis has several options for short-term stay within 5 miles (8 kilometers) of the Oregon State University campus. Contact the proprietor or business directly to make a reservation using a credit card.

You can find more hotels in the Corvallis' visitor's guide or in the Corvallis telephone directory.

 

Long-Term Housing

If you plan to live in off-campus housing, you should expect to spend several days locating and settling in to an apartment or room in a house. Off-campus rental housing is advertised in the following places:

  • The Corvallis Gazette Times: local newspaper. Find advertisements for rentals in the classified section.
  • Dex Yellow Pages: online directory. Search for "property management companies" and "Corvallis" for listings of many useful companies.
  • OSU faculty occasionally rent their homes out while on sabbatical.
  • Craigslist: online local classifieds and forums for 450 cities worldwide.
  • Corvallis ihouse: a home for international and U.S. undergrad and grad students, postdocs, and interns
  • The Depot Suites: fully furnished beautifully decorated apartments provide the perfect temporary housing, walking distance from OSU. For rent by the week or by the month.
  • At Home in Oregon: offering fully-furnished 2-4 bedroom apartments and condominiums for rent by the week or by the month.
  • Visit Corvallis: a listing of long and short term housing options.
  • Rental Agencies in Corvallis: advertises vacancies and available units in the area.
  • Renter's Guide available at the Memorial Union on campus.
  • City of Corvallis Rental Housing Program - a resource for people who have rental issues or concerns.

 

Types of Housing

Apartment: A set of rooms with separate bedroom(s), bath, kitchen, living room. Some apartments are advertised as "furnished". This means that a minimum amount of furniture is included with the rental. Most apartments are rented unfurnished (without furniture).
Studio Apartment: An apartment with a separate bathroom and kitchen. The living room and bedroom are combined into one room.
Quad: A set of four apartments grouped together with shared bathroom and kitchen.
Duplex: Two separate houses that join together at one of the outer walls.
Condominium: Similar to an apartment, but each unit is privately owned.
House: Multi-room living area (bedrooms, kitchen, dining room, living room, family room) plus a private yard and garage.

 

Common Housing Terminology

Apartment manager: The person in charge of your apartment building. Managers are paid to take care of problems and financial issues (collecting rent, deposits, etc.).
Cleaning deposit: Money that you must pay before you move into the housing for cleaning the rental property before and after you move in. This deposit is normally non-refundable.
Landlord: The property owner who rents houses or apartments to tenants.
Lease or rental agreement: A contract between you and your landlord in which you agree to pay a specific amount of rent for a certain number of months. If you move out before the ending date of the agreement, your landlord may require you to continue paying rent for the months remaining in the lease or until another tenant moves in.
Property management company: A company that is paid to manage a rental property for the property's owner. The company finds renters and makes sure the renters follow the lease. The company may also provide basic maintenance service.
Security deposit: Money that you must pay before you move into the housing. If you damage anything in the rental property this money will be used to repair the damage to the property. This deposit is sometimes refundable if you have not damaged the property. The refundability of security deposits will be listed in the lease agreement.
Tenant: The person who rents a house or an apartment.
Utilities: Services such as water, gas, electricity and garbage pick-up. Sometimes these services are included in the rent--usually they are separate. Your lease will define if utilities are included.

Housing Essentials

Upon finding housing, scholar may need to set up utility accounts and buy housing essentials such as furniture, housing goods, and groceries. Below are some areas that you can find housing essentials.

Public Sale at the OSUsed Store

The OSUsed Store is open for its public sale every Wednesday, and on the thurd Saturday of the month. Surplus property for sale includes bikes, desks, bookcases and other office materials for discount prices.

Craigslist for Sale

Craigslist offers a variety of items for sale in the Corvallis or other Oregon area. Review information on avoiding scams and fraud, and personal safety tips prior to using this site.

Corvallis Furniture

 A furniture re-use store created by local college students with the goal of making affordable furniture available to other students and residents.

Furniture Rental

If you are here for just a short time, you may be able to rent furniture through a furnature rental company. Search for "Furniture Rental" in your city in the Yellow Pages.

Second Hand and Resale Stores

Goodwill Industries

1325 NW 9th St, Corvallis and other Oregon locations

The Arc Thrift Stores

982 NW Beca Ave, Corvallis

Donating Items at the Completion of your Program

At the end of your program, don't throw away what you bought. Donate items to local donation collection locations.

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.



Estimated Expenses

Exchange Visitor scholars must have sufficient finances to support themselves and any dependents for their entire stay in the United States. Funding must cover the costs of the program, fees, housing and living expenses, and mandatory health insurance coverage.

Actualy costs for attending Oregon State may be higher. The minimum amount of funding that is considered sufficient for support at Oregon State is:

$1,200 / month            scholar

$1,620 / month            scholar + 1 dependent 

$ +420 / month            each additional dependent

Estimate of Expenses and Fees to Consider for Oregon State University: 2013-2014

The figures listed below are estimates and used for budgeting purposes only.

Room and Board $1,175 This amount is an average figure based on double occupancy for campus and off-campus living arrangements.
Miscellaneous and Personal $286 This is an estimate of what you might spend on personal items, clothing, cell phone, recreation, and travel.
Required Health Insurance
$80 to over $150 Cost of health insurance may vary by provider and length of coverage. The Department of State (DOS) requires that ALL J-1 Exchange Visitors have medical insurance in effect for themselves and any dependents in J-visa status for the duration of their stay in the United States.

Additional costs you may need to budget for depending on your program/situation are bench mark fees, immigration application fees, tuition, conferences, additional dependent costs, travel, and other costs. These costs vary by program, sponsor, and scholar. Check with your sponsoring department about additional fees.

Health Insurance and Care

The Department of State (DOS) requires that ALL J-1 Exchange Visitors have medical insurance in effect for themselves and any dependents in J-visa status for the duration of their stay in the United States.

Mandatory Insurance Requirements

  • Minimum Coverage
    Insurance shall cover: (1) medical benefits of at least $50,000 per person per accident or illness; (2) repatriation of remains in the amount of $7,500; and (3) expenses associated with medical evacuation in the amount of $10,000.

  • Additional Terms
    A policy secured to fulfill the insurance requirements shall not have a deductible that exceeds $500 per accident or illness, and must meet other standards specified in the regulations.

  • Maintenance of Insurance

    Willful failure on your part to maintain the required insurance will result in the termination of your exchange program.

Employees

  • Postdoctoral Scholars: See the OSU Postdoctoral Scholar Insurance page for details on insurance coverage offered as part of this training category.
  • Other positions (faculty or staff): Faculty or staff may be eligible for PEBB health insurance. Scholars should review their offer of employment to determine whether or not insurance coverage will be offered.
  • IMPORTANT NOTE: additional insurance coverage is necessary to satisfy U.S. Department of State requirements namely Emergency Medical Evacuation & Repatriation. Scholars must purchase this supplemental coverage, as it is not included in Public Employees’ Benefit Board coverage.

Non-Employees

  • OSU Student Health Center’s International Medical Plan: Scholars may enroll in the OSU International Medical plan on a self‐pay basis. This plan meets DOS minimum requirements. Scholars may not use the Student Health Center for treatment, but the plan can be used to pay for medical treatment at off‐campus medical institutions. Contact Mary Lloyd-Rex for more information.
  • PEBB: Qualifying scholars may enroll in Public Employees' Benefit Board (PEBB) coverage on a self‐pay basis.
  • IMPORTANT NOTE: additional insurance coverage is necessary to satisfy U.S. Department of State requirements namely Emergency Medical Evacuation & Repatriation. Scholars must purchase this supplemental coverage, as it is not included in Public Employees’ Benefit Board coverage.

Resources

IMPORTANT NOTE: additional insurance coverage may be necessary to satisfy U.S. Department of State requirements namely Emergency Medical Evacuation & Repatriation. Scholars must purchase this supplemental coverage, as it is not included in OSU staff benefits or some other insurance plans.

Check-in and Orientation

Mandatory J-1 Visa Check-in & Orientation for New International Scholars

All J-1 Exchange Visitors must check in with the International Scholars and Faculty Services (ISFS) upon arriving in the United States. The ISFS office will validate and activate your J Exchange Program and update your address with the SEVIS immigration system.

 

Why is this required?

It is a requirement of the Department of Homeland Security that all J-1 Exchange Visitors must check-in with the J program Responsible Officer in order to validate the program.

Failure to complete your registration will result in the Department of Homeland Security terminating your J-1 status; you will not be eligible to legally enter the U.S. nor work at OSU. You are not eligible for services on campus (for example receiving an OSU ID card or campus benefits), nor can you be added to payroll before completing your check-in and orientation.

At check-in, the ISFS office will:

  • make copies of your immigration documents (and any accompanying dependents),
  • update your physical address in the US in the SEVIS immigration system,
  • sign your DS-2019 allowing you to travel outside the US,
  • validate your Exchange Visitor program, and
  • offer an orientation to campus

 

What must I bring with me?

Scholars must bring the following documents and information for themselves and any J-2 dependents who have accompanied them to the US:

  • DS-2019
  • Passport
  • J Visa stamp
  • Paper copy of I-94 Arrival Record (you can access and print the I-94 from this website: http://www.cbp.gov/I94)
  • Training/Internship Placement Plan or T/IPP (Student Interns only)
  • Completed Biographical Information Form (pdf) which requires the scholar's physical living address in the U.S. and agreement to follow the responsibilities of a J-1 Exchange Visitor at OSU

 

When can I check-in?

Orientations are held almost every Thursday morning beginning at 10:00 am in University Plaza- Suite 190 (corner of 15th and Western on the northwest corner of the building) at 1600 SW Western Boulevard, Corvallis.

  • You must register for the Check-in and Orientation with OSU's International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS) as soon as you arrive on campus and within 30 days of the Program Start Date on the DS-2019.
  • The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) allows exchange visitors to enter the U.S. up to 30 days before or 30 days after the Program Start Date on the DS-2019.
  • If you cannot arrive and report to ISFS within 30 days of your Program Start Date, notify an International Scholar Advisor immediately.

 

How do I register for check-in?

 

Remote check-in process?

Exchange Visitors that are not able to make it to the OSU Corvallis campus for check-in may check-in remotely and access all orientation materials online. This is commonly done for scholars based in OSU extension locations.

Resources

The following resources are reviewed during check-in. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Current Scholars

The online scholar orientation guide contains useful information and resources for new and current international Exchange Visitors and employees at Oregon State University.

It is recommended that all scholars review the links and materials below before arriving in the U.S. and attending the mandatory scholar check-in (required for all new exchange visitors on a J-1 visa). If you have any questions, you can ask during the ISFS check-in orientation or through email.

Orientation Topics:

Orientation Opportunities

The online Scholar Orientation guide contains useful information for new and current international Exchange Visitors and employees at Oregon State University. It is recommended that all scholars review the links and materials below before attending the mandatory scholar check-in upon arrival at OSU. If you have any questions, you can ask at that time or through email.

OSU International Scholar Online Orientation & Resources

Jump to the ISFS online guide to resources for international scholars and faculty at OSU.

National Postdoctoral Association (NPA)

The NPA provides many useful resources specifically for postdoctoral scholars. However, all international scholars and faculty may find topics on the NPA web site to be of great value especially the International Postdoc Survival Guide.

OSU New Employee Orientation Sessions for Staff and Faculty (Human Resources)

OSU Human Resources holds a monthly orientation session for new employees and hires. Most of the information presented will be helpful for all scholars even if they are not employed by OSU; just be aware that not all benefits, programs, or services may apply to your program category.

The New Employee Orientation sessions will present new staff and faculty with:

  • The "big picture" of OSU, including the organizational structure, and its mission and values
  • An understanding of the campus resources and services available to assist
  • The terms and conditions of employment
  • An overview of health and retirement benefits if employed

Getting Off to a Great Start (pdf)

OSU Human Resources made an integration guide for new OSU employees that all scholars could benefit from. The guide provides information about campus, benefit options, HR orientation, training opportunities, ideas for working with your supervisor, and self-guidance.

Research Office New Faculty Orientation

New faculty and researchers are invited to attend a one-day orientation meeting in October to learn about services which help research faculty be sucessful such as navigating rules and regulations, funding, and a panel discussion on working with Federal agencies.

First Year Online Orientation

Online orientation for first year students at Oregon State offer additional links and information for getting settled at OSU. Not all information or policies apply to the scholar population and is for informational purposes only.

Resource Guide (ISOSU & ISFS)

International Students of OSU (ISOSU) and International Student and Faculty Services (ISFS) worked together with other offices on campus to bring you the OSU Multicultural Resource Guide that you can use to find out about things that others have found helpful and/or are important to know about while you are here.

Mandatory Scholar Check-in and Orientation (ISFS)

All J-1 Exchange Visitors must check in with the International Scholars and Faculty Services (ISFS) within 30 days of the DS-2019 Program Start Date and arrival in the United States. Scholars will review their immigration documents and the rules and regulations of their J visa category.

Accounts Set-up

There are various accounts that scholars may neet to set up upon arrival at Oregon State University in order to get access to OSU campus and Corvallis resources.

Cell Phone | Bank Account | OSU ID Card | ONID Network ID | Library | Social Media | Email Lists | Drivers Licence or Oregon State ID | Resources

 

Cell Phones

If you would like to have a cell phone while living in the US, Corvallis is covered by all four major providers (AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint). For a monthly service plan, most cell phone companies require a new customer to sign a two-year service agreement. Penalty charges apply if you cancel your contract within 2 years. If you do not want to sign a 2-year contract, you have a choice of pre-paid or pay-as-you-go plans. Visit the major provider's website for more detailed information.

  

Bank Account

When you arrive in Corvallis, you may choose to open checking and/or savings account(s) with  local bank. You usually need two pieces of picture identification (passport and OSU ID card), your local mailing address and money to open an account. More information is available on the Money and Banking page.

 

OSU ID Cards

Oregon State University Identification Cards is the official identification card for students, faculty, and staff. International scholars, faculty, and dependents will be able to get a OSU card. The card functions as a meal card, library card, access card, and more. It is issued by the OSU ID Center. Learn more about what documents are needed to get an OSU ID.

 

ONID OSU Network ID

OSU Network Identification (ONID) is a universal computer account available to all OSU students and employees. Scholars on an affiliate faculty appointment type may not have access to an ONID account since it is a limit to this appointment type.

You get a free email address with your ONID account, but ONID is much more than email. With an ONID username and password, you also get access to University technology services, the wireless network, Blackboard, ResNet, IS computer labs, and the Interlibrary Loan. For more information and set-up help visit Using Your ONID webpage.

 

Library Access

The OSU Libraries offer many scholarly trainings, and Library Resources for Faculty and Instructors. Learn how to get Library Access for Scholars.

 

Social Media and Activities

There are many activities and events on the OSU campus. Be informed about what is happening by subscribing or saving these links.

 

Email Lists

The OSU Email Listservs is a listing of all the public mailing lists on lists.oregonstate.edu. Click on a list name to get more information about the list, or to subscribe, unsubscribe, and change the preferences on your subscription.

 

Driver's License or Oregon State ID Card

To drive a car in the US, you will need to get an Oregon State Driver’s License. You must pass a written knowledge test of US driving laws in English and a driving test. You will also have to wait until 10 days after you first check-in with the ISFS office before going to the Department of Motor Vehicles before you will be able to get a driver’s license. More information on the Transportation page.

 

Searching for Resources

  • Google Maps will give you maps, driving, walking, or public transportation options if you need to get somewhere.
  • 211info has free information about more than 7,000 health, community, and social services. Corvallis is located in Benton county.
  • Craigslist provides local classifieds and forums for jobs, housing, for sale, and much more.
  • Visit Corvallis has information on things to see and so, events, lodging, and getting around Corvallis.

OSU ID Cards

Oregon State University Identification Cards is the official identification card for students, faculty, and staff. It functions as a meal card, library card, access card, and more. It is issued by the OSU ID Center.

Application Procedure

All persons applying for an OSU ID card must come to the ID Center in person and present proper identification for card issuance unless otherwise specified. You will receive your OSU ID card immediately after your photo is taken. Please be aware that a card fee may apply. Please choose the appropriate status category from the choices below for more information.

You will need to bring with you proper identification (Valid Passport, Driver's License, State ID Card, or Residence Alien Card) and a copy of your welcome letter from your sponsoring department. The letter will contain your OSU ID number and your classification. If you did not receive a welcome letter you may still come to the ID Center, however keep in mind that the center cannot issue an ID card until your sponsoring department has processed your paperwork.

Appointment Type

For OSU Employees:

OSU employees will be able to get an ID card after their hiring  department has submitted the Fast Track Employee ID form (available on OSCAR) to OHR. 

For J-1 Exchange Visitors in Researcher or Professor Categories:

The department sponsor will issue either an affiliate or courtesy faculty status form (available on OSCAR) before the Exchange Visitor can get an OSU ID card and ID number. For additional information about the affiliate vs. courtesy faculty ranks, please refer to the OHR policy and OSCAR.

  • Courtesy Faculty are eligible for a Courtesy Faculty ID card. Courtesy faculty rank appointments will be input into Banner by OHR and will give the visiting scholar greater access to library privileges and an ONID email account. You will need to bring with you proper identification and a copy of your welcome letter. The letter will contain your OSU ID number and your classification. We cannot issue an ID card until your sponsoring department has processed your paperwork.
  • Affiliate Faculty may obtain their ID Card at the ID card office by bringing the letter of Notice of Affiliate Faculty Status received from their department to the ID Center along with proper photo identification.

For Scholar Dependent's:

  • Spouse or Domestic Partner: The spouse or domestic partner of current OSU Students, Staff, and Faculty can use the Affiliate Card for checking out Valley Library materials, membership purchase and entry at Dixon Recreation Center, and certain Athletic ticket discounts. Both the OSU Scholar and their spouse or domestic partner must bring photo ID to the ID Center and sign an Affidavit of Marriage or an Affidavit of Domestic Partnership. OSU requirements for Domestic Partnership status are available at the ID Center. Affiliate ID card fee is $20.00. The affiliates card expires when the OSU Student/Employee leaves OSU.
  • Children: Children age 16-26 may also be eligible for an OSU ID in order to sign up for a Dixon Recreation Center pass. More information at the OSU ID Center.

International Student Interns:

J-1 Exchange Visitors in the Intern Category does not need an affiliate or courtesy faculty appointment. The ISFS office will email the ID Center asking that an ID card be issued to the J-1 Intern after the Intern's mandatory check-in appointment. The ID card fee is $20.00.

ID Center Location

The OSU ID Center is located in Room 094 of the Kerr Administration Building.

Money and Banking

Banking in the US | Banking Terms | Handling Money | Currency Value

  Banking in the United States

When you arrive in Corvallis, you may need to open a checking/and or savings account(s) with a bank. There are many banks in Corvallis. You can find which banks have local offices by looking in the Corvallis Phone Book (Type "Corvallis" and look in the "Finance" section). You can find out more information about the policies and procedures of each bank by looking at the bank's Web site. You usually will need two pieces of picture ID (passport and OSU ID card), your local mailing address, and money to open an account.

Checking accounts are designed for paying bills and general living expenses, allowing unlimited deposits and withdrawals each month. When you open a checking account, you receive checks, deposit slips, and a transaction register. You can also request an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) card that will allow you to withdraw or deposit money at ATM terminals worldwide.

Savings accounts are designed to store money for long periods of time. Savings accounts often have a limit on the number of withdrawals that can be made each month. Money usually earns a small amount of interest.

Credit cards are a popular form of payment in the U.S.; the most widely accepted credit cards are Visa and Master Card. It is not easy for international students or scholars to obtain credit cards in the U.S. It is best to apply for a credit card in your home country. If you would like to take cash from your credit or debit account, you can use a Plus, Cirrus, Interlink, or Star Network bank card to make cash withdrawal. ATMs are located in the airport, on the OSU campus, and around Corvallis. NPA advice on getting a credit card and building credit history.

Transferring funds is also an option to get money to your bank account in the U.S. Before coming to the U.S., familiarize yourself with procedures for transferring funds from your home country. There are fees associated with this process and it takes some time so upon arrival be prepared to pay your initial expenses.

International wire transfer of funds can be an option for scholars transferring bench fees (fee paid to work in some lab spaces) or other academic fees which go directly to the sponsoring department at OSU from an international personal bank account or scholarship provider. Contact an international scholar advisor for more information.

 

Banking Terms

  • ATM: Automatic Teller Machines are machines where you can withdraw money from or deposit money into your account by using an ATM card. ATMs can be found in many convenient locations both in Corvallis and the State of Oregon as well as in many countries throughout the world.
  • Balance: The amount of money remaining in your account after adding all deposits made, and deducting all checks written and cash withdrawn from the ATM.
  • Bounced check: A check, which is returned because there is not enough money in your account. You may be required to pay a substantial fine for each bounced check.
  • Debit Card: A card that can be used at stores and businesses to pay for goods or services. The money is withdrawn from your checking account.
  • Deposit: Money added to your account.
  • Minimum balance: The smallest amount of money you must maintain in your account in order to receive certain benefits such as free checking service.
  • Overdraft: A charge to your account that exceeds the amount of your balance.
  • PIN: a Personal Identification Number is a number you must enter into ATM machines or phone services before you can have access to your account. The PIN is used as a safety measure to ensure that you are the only person to use your account.

 

Handling Money

For safety reasons, you should carry any large sums of money ($50 or more) in the form of draft checks or traveler's checks. However, plan to carry some money to get set up and for small items such as phone calls. Also your first salary payment or fund transfer may not be available for 6-8 weeks after you arrive.

You should come prepared to pay living expenses, bring enough money to cover initial expenses such as rent and utility (gas, electric and telephone) deposits and housing application fees. These deposits and the first month's rent may range from $1,000 to $1,500 and application fees are usually $30. There may also be expenses for household items to get first set up (furniture, kitchen equipment, etc.).

If you expect funds from your home country for your OSU program, ensure that satisfactory arrangements for payment are made before you depart. You should know your government's regulations on currency exchange and bank procedures for money transfers to the United States. Delays in the transfer of program funds can create hardship and inconvenience. Financial assistance for international scholars in the U.S. is not available and U.S. immigration regulations governing the employment of non-immigrant scholars and students are very strict.

 

United States Currency Value

Value

Image

Penny

penny

Nickel

nickel

Dime
10¢

dime

Quarter
25¢

quarter

Half-Dollar (rarely used)
50¢

halfdollar

Golden Dollar
$1

golddollar

Paper Bills: $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100  

Rules and Regulations

Scholars are expected to know and follow state, federal, government, and OSU rules and regulations while living in the United States. These resources give a brief, but not complete, guide to regulations you should follow.

Resources

Alcohol Laws in Oregon

  • Legal drinking age is 21
  • Blood alcohol content defined as illegal: .08%
  • You cannot operate a motorvehicle with an open container of alcohol
  • Illegal to buy alcohol for minors under 21
  • Alcohol rules and minors information

Bike and Helmet Laws in Oregon

Seat Belt Laws in Oregon

Public Smoking in Oregon

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Safety and Emergency Procedures

Emergency Contact | Immigration Emergency | Embassy Contact | Emergency Contact Card | Safety

In case of an emergency, call 911

In case of an OSU campus emergency call 541-737-7000

Oregon State University recognizes the importance of maintaining a safe and secure learning environment for our students, scholars, staff and faculty members.  It is critical that everyone has an awareness of appropriate measures to be taken and procedures to follow to insure the safety of all.  These guidelines and procedures are provided to assist the campus community in recognizing emergent situations and taking proper actions to reduce exposure to risk and harm.

24-hour OSU Emergency Contact: call 541-737-7000

In case of an after-hours emergency, call this campus emergency number to reach the OSU Department of Public Safety. They will contact the International Programs staff for you.

When you call, ask the name of the person to whom you are speaking, then give that person the following information, speaking slowly and clearly:

  • Your name
  • Your location (including the name of country, province, city or town, and location within the city, such as street address)
  • How we can contact you (telephone number, fax number, e-mail address)
  • A brief explanation of the problem, and the type of help you are requesting

 

Immigration Emergency

The International Programs staff is here to support you while you are abroad or in the United States. We are available to talk with you if you have questions or concerns, or if an emergency situation arises.

 

Embassy Contact

 

Emergency Contact Card

An emergency contact card is an essential part of an emergency kit. If a natural disaster or other emergency were to take place, you should know whom to contact and where to go.

  • How to make an emergency contact card
  • Write your name, phone number, and home address on the card
  • Write the local phone numbers for the police, fire department and ambulance service
  • Print and include this webpage
  • Poison control phone
  • Your doctor's name and contact
  • Your health insurance number
  • Who to contact in an emergency: names, numbers, and language spoken (in your home country and the U.S.)
  • Embassy contact
  • Keep this information with you and leave a copy at home and with a friend/sponsoring department

 

OSU Safety Information

A safe and secure environment is made possible through each member of the Oregon State University community's involvement in crime prevention and sensible behavior. In order to have a safe and successful Oregon State University experience, each person must take responsibility to recognize one's own vulnerability to crime and reduce risks through preventive action and cooperation with Oregon State Police and the Department of Public Safety.

Other Resources

OSU Alert System (requires ONID account)

This system allows public safety officials to create emergency alerts that contain a recorded voice message, an email message, and a text message and send them to the current database of contact information for all employees and students. In crisis situations, the system will try all means of contacting each person in the database, and uses sophisticated means to verify contact so that we know we have reached everyone we could.

Benton County Emergency Services

Working to assist emergency responders and promote community safety.  See suggestions for preparing yourself and your home in case of an emergency.

Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

The CDC maintains several departments concerned with occupational safety and health. 

Benton County Health Department

Benton County Health Department works to create and sustain the conditions in which all people in our community can be healthy.

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, recovery, education, and references.

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Transportation

Information about transportation options and vehicle/parking resources for the Corvallis campus can be located below.

How to Get to Corvallis and Oregon State University

Step-by-step guidance on how to find your way to Corvallis and OSU from the nearest airports.

Getting Around Corvallis and the Surrounding Area

You will find links to bus schedules around Corvallis, to Albany, Philomath, and Newport; train information; taxi cab company names and phone numbers; links to car rental agencies; and more.

OSU Bike Loan Program

The Oregon State Bike Loan Program is a collaborative effort to reduce the impact of vehicle use on the OSU campus and in our local environment. Bikes are available by the term, week or day. Availability is limited.

Driving in Oregon

Link to the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicle's website.  Learn about driver license requirements.

Buying and Owning a Car

What you need to know about insurance, buying new vs used cars, registration, and car repairs.

TAPS Transit and Parking Services

You can buy an OSU parking permit, pay a citation, get answers to parking questions, and view shuttle information.

Travel Safety Tips

Travel safety tips and resources.

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Buying and Owning a Car

While cars are convenient, there are many reasons not to own one. They are expensive to buy and operate, parking can be difficult and frustrating, insurance is required and is very expensive. Public transportation is available around the Corvallis area  and buses are free. It is possible to rent a car for weekends or vacations to explore Oregon.

Automobile insurance

Drivers of automobiles, motorcycles, and other motor vehicles have a financial responsibility in case of an accident that involves injury or death, or damage to property or another vehicle. DO NOT DRIVE WITHOUT INSURANCE! There can be very serious legal and financial consequences if you do not have insurance.  Laws in the state of Oregon require all drivers to attain liability insurance for their motor vehicles. Insurance requirements.

Before you buy a car

You can save some money if you do some research before you buy. The Consumer Reports annual survey of new or used cars (available at the library or bookstore), covers car reliability, frequency of repairs, etc. It will help you become educated about which car you wish to buy, and the way to get the best price. For a small subscription price, their website www.consumerreports.org has information on insurance, buying a car and other consumer advice. Additionally there is an website at www.consumerworld.org that has information on buying a car. When you go to look at a car, take along a friend who is knowledgeable about purchasing and evaluating a car.

Buying a new car

You can choose from many different makes (such as brands of new cars, sizes and models). After you choose a model, you must decide about "options" or special features engine size, automatic or manual ("stick shift") transmission, and so on. Check the internet for “car prices”—sites such as www.edmunds.com/ have information on what the dealer costs are. Then when you go to spend time looking at different cars and models you will know what the basic prices and added "option" costs should be. Each car dealer offers different prices or “mark ups” from the base price). If buying from a dealer, always ask for their best price. Nobody pays the "sticker" price--always bargain!

Buying a used car

You will probably get the best deal on a used car from a private person rather than from a dealer. It is okay to bargain on the price. First check the The Kelly Blue Book price (www.kbb.com/ ) which gives average prices for used cars for different years and models. Then check bulletin boards, the classifieds of local newspapers, including the Express and Classified Flea Market (www.cfm.com/about.asp) for cars for sale. The Buggy Bank (www.buggybank.com) at 2821 Shattuck Ave. is a good place to look at a variety of cars for sale by owners. Any reputable person selling a used car will allow you to take the car to a mechanic for a thorough inspection (called a "diagnostic check"). Mechanics usually charge $50 60 for this service. Check in the Yellow Pages of the telephone directory for the phone numbers of local mechanics, or contact the Oregon State Automobile Association (http://www.aaaorid.com/). Ask those who live in the area if they can recommend a mechanic or repair shop. Call first to inquire about prices and to make an appointment.

Paying for a car

Cash--You can often get the best price for a car by offering to pay the full amount in "cash"--in this case meaning a cashiers check from a bank, or travelers checks. DO NOT CARRY DOLLARS! --Be suspicious of anyone asking you to bring dollars! IT CAN BE DANGEROUS TO CARRY LARGE AMOUNTS OF MONEY WITH YOU. Also, if you pay cash and anything goes wrong with the car, you will not have any way to cancel your check or track your payment.

Financing a new or used car--Whether buying a new or used car through a dealer, compare the cost of different methods of financing. Loans may add 20 30% to the total price of the car. If you should decide to buy on credit, it is best to do so through a credit union, bank or savings and loan association. And remember, before signing any documents, make certain that you understand all the details of the sale and payments required. Keep copies of all documents.

Documents needed to register a car

When you complete the purchase of a used car, you must be given a certificate of ownership, called the ”Certificate of Title” or "pink slip" by the dealer or previous owner; it must be signed by them, and your name indicated on it as the new owner. You will need this slip to register your car or to sell it later.

Automobile registration

If purchasing a new car, the dealer may take care of the registration and you will be mailed the license plates. For a used car, it must be registered with the DMV. Check the website at http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/vehicle/trnew.shtml for current information. Take the car and the pink slip to the DMV. New car and some used car dealers take care of registering the cars they sell. Upon payment of the registration fees, which vary according to the model and age of the car, a temporary registration slip will be issued and ownership recorded. An official registration slip will be mailed to you. Used cars keep their license plates, so you do not need to remove them.

Repairing cars

AAA of Oregon has a list of auto repair shops in the state to protect you from dishonest repair people.

When you meet with the repair person, please check that:
• You are provided with a written estimate of how much the repair work will cost (cost of labor + cost of parts) before the repair work is begun. No charge can be made unless you approve it and give authorization to do the work;
• A written invoice (bill), must be given to you, with all work and parts itemized;
• You must be given the worn out parts if you ask for them before the work is begun;
• If used or rebuilt parts are used, this must be noted on the bill; and
• No repairs may be done by a shop other than the one you are dealing with, unless you are notified and approve.

Hopefully, you will not have any difficulties. However, if you experience problems, please learn how to file a complaint.

Getting Around Corvallis and the Surrounding Area

Public Transportation | Other Oregon Transit | Taxi | Car Rental

There are many options for scholars to get around Corvallis and the United States without a car.

  Public Transportation in the Corvallis-Benton County Area

 

Corvallis-Benton County Area Transportation Providers

 

Other Oregon Community Transit Providers

 

Taxi Cabs

  • Beaver Cab (541) 738-8294
  • Auto-Taxi (541) 752-8294
  • Fast-Cab (541) 753-3278
  • Auto Taxi (541) 752-8294

 

Car Rentals

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Travel Information

During program breaks or vacation it will be a great opportunity to travel and see Oregon and the United States. Below are some travel safety tips and links to help you choose your destination and plan your travel.

Explore Oregon

Travel America

Travel Safety Tips

  • Highway Safety: American Red Cross highway safety tips for driving on the highway in the United States.
  • National Council for Crime Prevention: A non-profit group, the National Council for Crime Prevention has a web site full of current information on avoiding crime. The pages are available in English and Spanish and provide a wealth of personal safety information.
  • Make My Trip: Packing smart, handling money, transport, phones, American slang, and personal safety tips around traveling.
  • USATourist: USATourist.com has safety tips on driving and traveling in the United States.

Travel and Transportation Agencies

Air Travel

Traveling Abroad

Other Resources

Financial Information

Keep copies of credit cards and numbers for reporting lost or stolen cards. Let your banks and credit card companies know when you will travel. Some countries use credit cards with chip-embedded technology, check with your bank.

Telephone and Communication Abroad

There are some general steps you should follow when taking your phone out of the U.S. Understand the service and data package available with your mobile devices abroad.

 

Documents

Leave copies of important documents at home. Inform your Department Head of your itinerary and emergency contact information.

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Taking Classes

Enrollment and Taking Classes at Oregon State University

International Scholars and dependents may want to take a class or classes at Oregon State University or a different institution during their stay in the United States.

If you are in the United States in any non-student visa status it is critical that you consult with your Immigration advising office before applying for admission. Please be aware that only certain visa types allow an individual to pursue coursework. Consequences of taking classes may result in failure to maintain visa status.

Visa Type

Allowed to Take Classes (part-time)?

Allowed to pursue a degree (full-time)?

Eligible for on-campus student employment?

Eligible to apply for post-graduation work authorization?

Where to go for advice

B-1/B-2

No

No

No

No

n/a

F-1, J-1/ J-2 Students/Dependents with OSU-sponsored status documents

Yes

Yes

Yes, with authorization

Only F-1 and J-1 students may apply

International Student Advising & Services (ISAS)

F-2 Dependents

Yes, part-time only (9 credits)

No

No

No

International Student Advising & Services (ISAS)

J-1, H-1B, E-3, TN with OSU-sponsored status documents

*Yes, in some cases

**See note below

No

No

International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS)

J-2, E-3D with OSU-sponsored status documents

Yes

Yes

***See note below.

No

International Scholar & Faculty Services

H-4, TD with OSU-sponsored status documents

Yes

Yes

No

No

International Scholar & Faculty Services

Non-OSU visa holders

Maybe, check with sponsor

Maybe

Maybe

Maybe

Program (visa) sponsor

Other Visa Types Sponsored by OSU (PP, PR, L2, etc.)

Contact International Student Advising & Services (ISAS)

  *J-1 Professor, Research Scholar, Short Term Scholar, and Student Intern categories

The primary purpose of exchange visitors in these categories is research and/or interning.  Visitors may take classes related to their research program or internship as long as their original program is not delayed or interrupted by part-time study. 

  • OSU Courses: OSU policy limits course load to 6 graduate or 8 undergraduate credits per academic term. Before enrolling in classes, scholars must register as non-degree students.  Apply to OSU online by visiting admissions.
  • English Courses: OSU policy limits course load to 9 credits of English Language per term. Apply for INTO-OSU English Language classes through International Admissions.
  • Other Courses: Linn-Benton Community College Admissions.

**If enrollment in classes becomes the primary objective for a J-1 scholar, then the J-1 category may no longer be appropriate. A change of status type may be needed and the scholar is requested to contact ISFS about his/her situation.

 

J-2 and E-3D Dependents

J-2 Exchange Visitors may enroll as degree or non-degree seeking students on a full or part-time basis. Learn more about dependent benefits.  

***Dependent Employment Authorization

J-2 or E-3D dependents are eligible for on-campus student employment positions (if they are enrolled in at least 1 credit at OSU) or off-campus employment only if they have applied for work authorization and received an Employment Authorization Document.

 

Important Consideration for Dependents

While E-3D, F-2, J-2, H-4, and TD dependents may take classes and even pursue a degree, they are NOT eligible for the same kinds of benefits that they would be if in a student visa category.  Talking with an international student advisor about your options may be helpful in making a decision about your visa status and future plans.

Learn English

There are many English language learning opportunities for scholars, students, and dependents in the Corvallis and surrounding area. First read the policies regarding taking classes which may restrict study depending on your visa type.

OSU English/Conversation Programs

INTO OSU

INTO OSU provides opportunities for learning English as a Second Language. View the different types of international English programs.

International Resource Center

The International Resource Center (IRC) is located in the MU and provides a place to practice English and bring together various cultures in the community. Various cultural organizations put on events throughout the year, and there are multiple conversation opportunities each week.

ISOSU Coffee Hour

This is a weekly meeting anyone can attend. International students meet to practice English and make friends. More information about upcoming events.

Community English/Conversation Programs

Crossroads International

  • Conversation School for Women: Crossroads Conversation School is for international women interested in improving their English language skills and making friends. The school is a non-religious, nonpolitical, ommunity program. Classes meet twice weekly in small groups of five to ten women. The school offers beginning to advanced instruction in conversational English at low cost. Students explore other cultures, learn English survival skills, and develop friendships. Childcare is provided at the school for an additional cost.
  • Conversation and Friendship: Crossroads International provides a link between the University and community members for students and scholars, as well as family members of international students or scholars to practice English.

Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center (CMLC) Conversation Groups

The Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center offers English Conversation Groups at no cost to students, faculty, their family members or community members. Groups meet twice weekly for one hour at 128 SW 9th Street in Corvallis.

Linn-Benton Community College

The English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program is presented by the English Language and Culture Institute in partnership with LBCC. ELCI provides instruction for students with a wide range of English language proficiency and personal needs.

Research

The OSU Research Office provides a variety of services in support of the research activities of OSU faculty. Their page has many useful links and resources to help researchers get involved and connected.

Orientation for New Research Faculty

The Research Office offers an annual orientation for research faculty and support staff who have recently joined Oregon State University. Research faculty and support staff in all disciplines who have recently joined Oregon State University are invited at the begining of each acadmeic year to a program introducing services that support success.

Research Study Rooms

Faculty and doctorate students can check out 90-day research rooms. Research study rooms are available from the OSU Library for a 90-day loan period to all faculty and doctorate students who are within 6 months of preparing for or have completed their oral exams.

Office of Sponsored Programs

The Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) has central responsibility for proposal submission for sponsored research, scholarship, instructional and other activities at Oregon State University, and contractual compliance as it relates to sponsored activities.

Office of Research Integrity

The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) ensures compliance with ethical and legal responsibilities in research involving live vertebrate animals, biosafety, chemical safety, scientific diving and boating, radiation safety, human subjects and financial conflicts of interest. ORIworks with other committees to ensure compliance and integrity.

Research in OSU Colleges & Multidisciplinary Centers

Life and Customs in the US

There are many topics within American Life and Customs in the United States. Below are a few links and resources to get started.

Culture of the United States

Social Etiquette and Norms in the United States

Social norms are shared expectations about what kinds of behaviors are acceptable or not.  Social norms are not actual rules because you cannot get in legal trouble for breaking them, however, breaking social norms can make people uncomfortable or it can hurt the social lives of those who do it.

American History, Arts, and Culture

Workplace Etiquette

American Communication and Business

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Cultural Adjustment

Cultural adjustment is a process an individual has to go through to be able to work effectively and live comfortably in a place that is new and unfamiliar to them. Living in a new culture requires you to learn a new set of cultural patterns and behaviors. This process can be very challenging and sometimes uncomfortable. There are generally three main types of cultural adjustment*.

CULTURE SURPRISE usually occurs during the first few days of your visit as you initially
become aware of superficial differences. Examples: people dress differently, signs are in a
different language, nonverbal behaviors are different.

CULTURE STRESS
is a fairly short-term response to "stimulus overload." This occurs when
you begin to respond to the behavior of the "new" culture. Examples: trying to drive a car, doing
your own shopping, hearing comments about yourself.

CULTURE SHOCK
is a normal, healthy psychological reaction to the stress of living in a
different culture. You experience feelings of tension and anxiety because you have lost familiar
cultural cues. Your actions do not always get you what you want. And your inability to
communicate effectively with others is frustrating.

*Janet and Milton Bennett, 1999

At some point during the cultural adjustment process, you will probably experience culture shock. Culture shock is caused by the stress of being in a new culture and is a normal part of adjusting to a new place. When you live in a new culture, your own values are continually brought into question. Also, you are cut off from the cultural clues and known patterns with which you are familiar. Kalvero Oberg, the man first credited with diagnosing culture shock, describes it this way:

“These signs and clues include the thousand and one ways in which we orient ourselves to the situations of daily life: when to shake hands and what to say when we meet people, when and how to give tips…how to make purchases, when to accept and when to refuse invitations, when to take statements seriously and when not…”

You will probably not just wake up one morning and say, “Oh, I am experiencing culture shock!” It is a gradual, cumulative process that builds up slowly. It is important to recognize the symptoms of culture shock so you can be better prepared for it.

Some Symptoms of Culture Shock**

  • anxiety, crying a lot
  • irritability, hopelessness
  • homesickness, distrust of hosts
  • depression, withdrawal
  • fatigue, stereotyping
  • boredom, self-doubt
  • avoiding contact with host nationals, difficulty studying effectively

Not everyone experiences culture shock in the same way. You may have difficulty sleeping while your friend sleeps most of the time. You may experience many of the symptoms listed above or only a few of them. The most important thing to remember is that culture shock is a normal part of the adjustment process. If your symptoms are severe, be sure to let others know how you are feeling. Talk to a friend, an international scholar advisor, or a counselor in the community. You do not have to be alone!

What You Can Do to Help Fight Culture Shock:

  1. Realize that culture shock is a natural part of adjusting to a new culture. Practically everyone who lives abroad experiences culture shock to some degree—you are not alone. If you are familiar with the symptoms of culture shock and anticipate them, you will have an easier time adjusting.
  2. Don’t be afraid to share your feelings with others. Talk to other international students about what you are feeling and experiencing. You will probably find that others can relate to how you are feeling.
  3. Become involved in activities on campus or in the community. This is a good way to meet people and will help enrich your time in the United States. If you feel uncomfortable joining a program or activity, ask a friend to come with you.
  4. Develop a “support system.” Being away from family and friends who normally support you can be difficult. It is important to connect with others who can provide you support.
  5. Take care of yourself. Living in a foreign country can be very stressful on your body. Remember to get plenty of rest, eat well, and exercise. Join an intramural sport, try out Dixon Recreation Center, cook your favorite dish from your country, or try the local ethnic grocery stores.
  6. Take some “time out.” Speaking a foreign language all day can be very exhausting! Remember to spend some quiet time each day reading a book or listening to music in your own language.
  7. Keep your sense of humor. It is important to be able to laugh. Allow yourself to see the humor in misunderstandings and embarrassing situations.
  8. Set small goals for yourself. Remember that many of the things that were easy for you may not be so easy in a new culture. Make realistic goals so you can feel good about reaching them.
  9. Ask questions and learn from others. If you don’t understand something, remember that it is okay to ask for help. OSU faculty and staff, classmates, and other international students can help answer your questions and increase your understanding of American culture.
  10. Keep a positive attitude. You will most likely experience some negative feelings while you are in the U.S. While this is perfectly normal, it is important to not let them dominate you. You might try keeping a list of your enjoyable experiences so your outlook remains positive.

**Material adapted from Survival Kit for Overseas Living, Robert Kohls, Chicago: Intercultural Press, 1994.

Employee Services and Support

International scholars and faculty that are paid through Oregon State University will find the following resources useful. Each link will take you to the specific program's website for more information. All links located at Faculty and Staff Resources from Oregon State University.

Campus Resources

Employee Services

Professional Development

Social Security Information

Social Security Number and Card

A Social Security Number is a personal nine-digit number which helps the Social Security Administration maintain an accurate record of your wages or earnings that are covered under the Social Security Act.

An international visitor must be employed by Oregon State University to be eligible for a Social Security Number. International employees applying for a Social Security Number (SSN) card must apply in person at a Social Security Administration (SSA) office. The closest SSA to OSU is in Albany, Oregon. International employees must attend the new scholar check-in with ISFS before they apply for a Social Security Number.

Social Security Administration (SSA) Office Location

Address:

SUITE 110
1390 WAVERLY DRIVE SE
ALBANY, OR 97322

Phone:

1-800-772-1213

Hours:

Monday

9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Tuesday

9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Wednesday

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Thursday

9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Friday

9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Saturday

Closed

Sunday

Closed

Office Closings

Contact Information for Social Security (includes Interpreter service for non native English speakers)

Procedures

The Student Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) advises that applicants for a social security card should be in the United States for more than ten days before going to the social security office to apply. Scholars will also need to attend the check-in with the ISFS office in order to have an active immigration record. This allows time for arrival data from the port-of-entry to be entered in the primary system that the social security administration uses for authorization validation.

At a Social Security appointment, employees will need to present the following documents:

  1. Offer letter from the department for which they will be working

  2. I-94 Arrival Record, printed from https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html

  3. Original immigration status document (DS-2019 for J-1, I-797 Approval Notice for H-1B, I-94 for TN, etc.)

  4. Valid passport

  5. One additional piece of identification establishing identity & age. This can be the US visa stamp.

Upon submitting the application, the scholar should request an SSA receipt as it can take 2 - 4 weeks to receive a SSN card by mail. The receipt is necessary for adding the employee to OSU's payroll and should be shown to the sponsoring department.

You need a Social Security number to get a job, collect Social Security benefits and receive some other government services. But you don't often need to show your Social Security card. Do not carry your card with you. Keep it in a safe place with your other important papers.

How do I get a SSN if I am not employed by OSU?

Lawfully admitted noncitizens can get many benefits and services without a Social Security number. You do not need a number to conduct business with a bank, register for school, apply for educational tests, or obtain private health insurance. You cannot get a Social Security number for the sole purpose of obtaining a driver’s license or applying for these other applications.

J-2 scholar dependents with an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) are also allowed to obtain a Social Security Number. More information about applying for an EAD card and work authorization here.

Resources

Tax Information

Oregon State University cannot assist international students, visitors or employees with tax advising or tax preparation. However, the following information can assist sponsors and department business offices in guiding the non-resident alien (NRA) through the US and State of Oregon tax processes.

Main People of Contact for Paying NRA's and Foreign Businesses

Where To Begin

International Employees

  • NPA Beginner's Guide to Income Taxes for International Postdocs (National Postdoctoral Association)
  • Submit a CO-NRA and W-4 forms for all non-resident alien employees, along with the new hire job forms.
  • CO-NRA forms must be updated by the employee annually. These forms are available on OSCAR.
  • Does the scholar's country have a Tax Treaty with the US?  Find out here: 2012 Tax Treaties for Non-Resident Aliens
  • Form 8233 instructions and filing schedule can be found on the IRS website.
  • If you have any questions related to this information, email Anita Gurule or call 541-737-3770.
  • Visit the ISFS webpage on US Taxes for additional information. Each year ISFS office sends a link to Glacier Tax Prep, an online tax software system, to assist with your federal tax preparations.

International Exchange Visitors - if paid an honorarium or reimbursement

  • Information on applying for an Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN) can be found on the IRS website. If the visitor does not have an ITIN, the reimbursement or honorarium will be taxed at 30%.
  • Submit Form 8233 to the Business Affairs office, along with reimbursement form.

Taxes

  • If an international scholar need a number for tax purposes and you are not authorized to work in the United States, you can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Visit IRS in person or call the IRS toll-free number, 1-800-TAXFORM (1-800-829-3676), and request Form W-7, Application For An Individual Taxpayer Identification Number.
  • If you are assigned a number for nonwork purposes, you cannot use it to work. If you use it to work, we will inform DHS.

Local Resources

Searching | Post Office | Medical | Bank | Credit Union | Library | Recreation | Schools

Local resources vary by your location in Oregon. You may use the links to search for local resources such as the post office, medical centers, banks and credit unions, libraries, recreation and schools.

Searching for Local Resources

  • Google Maps will give you maps, driving, walking, or public transportation options if you need to get somewhere.
  • 211info has free information about more than 7,000 health, community, and social services. Corvallis is located in Benton county.
  • Craigslist provides local classifieds and forums for jobs, housing, for sale, and much more.
  • Visit Corvallis has information on things to see and so, events, lodging, and getting around Corvallis.

 

Corvallis Post Office

Corvallis, OR 97333
1-800-275-8777‎ · USPS.com

 

Medical Centers

2400 NW Kings Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-2400 ‎ · corvallis.familydoctors.net
  
5234 SW Philomath Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎

(541) 768-4970 ‎ · samhealth.org

  
530 NW 27th St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 766-6835 ‎ · co.benton.or.us
  
1128 NE 2nd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-8100 ‎ · beaversportsmedicine.com
  
201 Plageman Bldg, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 737-9355 ‎ · studenthealth.oregonstate.edu
(only available for enrolled students)
Options Pregnancy Resource Center  
867 NW 23rd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 758-3662 ‎ · possiblypregnant.org
  
985 NW 23rd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 753-1287 ‎ · yourbodyofhealth.com
  
1505 NW Harrison Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 754-6222 ‎ · valleyeyecare.com
  
601 NW Elks Dr, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 754-1254 ‎ · corvallisclinic.com
  
999 NW Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 754-2225 ‎ · nwhealing.com

 

Banks and ATMs

978 NW Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 752-5161 ‎ · citizensebank.com
  
324 SW 3rd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 758-2881 ‎ · locators.bankofamerica.com
  
235 NW Monroe Ave, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-5611 ‎ · wellsfargo.com
  
415 NW 3rd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 752-0474 ‎ · umpquabank.com
  
148 NW 25th St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(800) 732-0173 ‎ · osufederal.com
  
375 NW Monroe Ave, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-4000 ‎ · usbank.com
  
555 NE Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 758-2181 ‎ · centralwcu.org
  
777 NW Kings Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 754-7277 ‎ · locator.chase.com
  
275 SW 3rd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 752-5161 ‎ · citizensebank.com
  
2600 NW 9th St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-2600 ‎ · usbank.com

 

Credit Unions

555 NE Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 758-2181 ‎ · centralwcu.org
  
2101 NW Professional Dr, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 754-7765 ‎ · bcscu.org
  
1044 NE Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 752-9662 ‎
  
Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 224-6025 ‎
  
1823 14th Ave SE, Albany, OR ‎

(541) 791-5400 ‎ · selco.org

 
707 Waverly Dr SE, Albany, OR ‎
(541) 928-2773 ‎ · nwcu.com

 

Libraries

Corvallis Public Library
645 NW Monroe Ave, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 766-6926 ‎ · cbcpl.net

 

Recreation

175 SW Twin Oaks Cir, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-0776 ‎ · corvallissportspark.com
play indoor · lil kickers
  
660 SW 26th St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 737-4455 ‎ · oregonstate.edu
oregon state beavers · basketball coach · college basketball · ncaa
  
Gill Coliseum, 660 SW 26th St, Corvallis, OR ‎
  
Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 737-3748 ‎ · oregonstate.edu
  
207 NW 2nd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 754-6444 ‎ · peaksportscorvallis.com
sales people · snowboards · backpacking · trek
  
Corvallis, OR ‎
  
360 SW Avery Ave, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 766-6871 ‎ · co.benton.or.us
  
1940 NW Highland Dr, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 766-7946 ‎ · ci.corvallis.or.us
water slide · lap swimming · indoor pools · outdoor water · toddlers
  
  
327 SW 3rd St, Corvallis, OR ‎
(541) 757-1983 ‎ · wowfit.net

 

Schools

1555 SW 35th St, Corvallis, OR
(541) 757-5811 · csd509j.net

Disclaimer: This page contains information and links outside of OSU. OSU makes no warranty, guarantee or representation to the accuracy of the information posted here nor the accuracy or compliance with applicable laws of sites external to the OSU website. OSU does not in any way endorse services or products promoted by sponsoring organizations or websites listed here. We encourage users to verify the legitimacy of information and organizations cited here.

Cultural Organizations

OSU and Corvallis have a wealth of organizations and centers committed to celebrating the diversity of the campus and community. All are welcome to join any of these groups and centers.

International Students of Oregon State University (ISOSU)

The International students of Oregon State University (ISOSU) leads in creating a community that enhances and influences the student experience. ISOSU facilitates cross-cultural interaction and understanding by inviting many voices from around the world to be heard. ISOSU is committed to supporting and developing a wide range of international opportunities for the OSU community focusing on the education of issues and appreciation of cultures on this university campus.  ISOSU is responsible for the International Resource Center (IRC), located in the Memorial Union.

INTO OSU Cultural Ambassador Conversant Program

Engage with your international student peers!  Help them learn about life at OSU and your culture while you learn about theirs. This is a great way to internationalize your education at OSU and gain cultural diversity experience here on campus. Cultural Ambassador groups aim to explore our campus and participate in meaningful conversations.

OSU Student Organizations

There are a number of country and region-specific groups, as well. For a complete list of all of the registered student groups on campus, please visit the OSU Student Organization site. 

OSU Cultural Centers

OSU has multiple cultural centers which provide programs and activities for the OSU community. 

Intercultural Student Services

The mission of the Office of Intercultural Student Affairs is to build the intercultural and Cross-Cultural capacity of students through high-impact pedagogical practices and support services, so as to best inform and empower them in a globally diverse and engaged world.

Crossroads International

Crossroads International is a community volunteer organization that provides friendship, hospitality, and language assistance for OSU's international students and visiting scholars. For more than 35 years, Crossroads International has connected international students, faculty & scholars, and their family members with local volunteers for friendship and education. We offer five programs, regular events and special activities like our International Film Festival - so there are many ways to get involved and meet people! Volunteers are always needed, and students or scholars may request services at our office or by filling out some of our online forms.

Multicultural Literacy Center

Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center (CMLC) is a place where people of all cultures can come together in a “living room for learning,” where all people can be teachers and learners, where sharing cultures and expanding literacies enables everyone to take part in the community.

Entertainment

Oregon State University offers a friendly, welcoming community where students and scholars can get involved in their favorite activities — and try new ones. Scholars can get involved on campus, as well as in the Oregon community with community events such as lectures, concerts, festivals and other cultural programs. Find an area that interests you and get involved!

Corvallis Guides

On Campus

Art and Culture

Corvallis and Oregon

Get Informed

Entertainment

Film

Activity Centers & Education

Art

Festivals and Events

Parks

Resources for Women

 Resources for Women Researchers and Scholars

Multicultural Resource Guide

Your resource guide to multicultural communities and services at Oregon State University and beyond.

Office of Equity & Inclusion

The Office of Equity and Inclusion is committed to success for the entire university community through equality, fairness, and understanding.

Office of Human Resources

The office of Human Resources believes that each employee has a significant role in the achievement of the University’s mission, and that diversity in the University’s culture is critical to success. By promoting integrity, flexibility, mutual exchange of ideas, and continuous improvements, the OHR looks to provide opportunities for all its employees to achieve their career and work life goals.

OSU Cross-Cultural Mentor Program

The OSU Cross-Cultural Mentoring program is designed to connect students with faculty/Staff from across campus, to create a support network, and to provide a cross-cultural educational experience.

Women and Minorities in Engineering

WME’s mission is to encourage women and minorities to join the field of engineering; through recruitment, retention and research.

President’s Commission on the State of Women

PCOSW actively advocates and promotes a positive climate for all university women students, staff, faculty, and administrators. Visit PCOSW’s resource page or find them on facebook.

 OSU Childcare Resources

Using community and campus resources for childcare, these programs address the particular financial, developmental, and educational needs of children and their parents.

 

OSU Professional Development Opportunities

 OHR Workshops & Online Trainings

The Office of Human Resources offers a wide variety of workshops and online resources aimed at addressing both professional and personal needs of the campus community – from teaching effective time management, to promoting understanding of legislation that informs campus policies. Additionally, a workshop aimed at leveraging OSU research for professional development is in the works, with details coming soon.

OSU Graduate School Postdoctoral Program

The Postdoctoral program at OSU offers a full-time program of advanced academic preparation and research training under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

OSU Women's Network

OWN is an organization for female personnel at OSU. It is designed to gather and serve women from all areas of the University, including classified staff, professional faculty, teaching faculty and research and extension faculty/staff.

OSU Women’s Center

The OSU Women’s Center is dedicated to providing meaningful, inclusive programs, mentoring and networking opportunities, and offers an extensive library and welcoming space.

Office of Equity and Conclusion

The Office of Equity and Inclusion is committed to success for the entire university community through equality, fairness, and understanding.

 

Connect with your Community

 Crossroads International

Crossroads is a group of volunteers from the community that help enrich the experience of international students and build a bridge between people in the community and international students and scholars at Oregon State University, and their families.

Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center

The CMLC is a volunteer-run organization dedicated to providing a place where people of all cultures can come together in a “living room for learning,” where all people can be teachers and learners; where sharing cultures and expanding literacy enables everyone to take part in the community

 

Health Resources

 Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

Cascade is pleased to provide EAP services, through professional counselors who listen to you, help you sort things out and then work with you on a plan to set things straight, either over the phone or through in-person visits.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CaPS), for OSU students only

Counseling and Psychological Services provides counseling, consultation, outreach and education to OSU students, faculty, and staff. We do this in order to facilitate student’s academic success, mental health, and personal development and promote a culture of positive mental health at OSU.

Oregon Public Employees’ Benefit Board

PEBB designs, contracts and administers medical, dental, life, accident, disability and long-term care insurance, and flexible spending accounts for state employees and their dependents.

Office of Human Resources: Employee Benefits

The office of Human Resources assists in coordinating and managing public employees’ benefits (PEBB), worker's compensation and retirement benefits for OSU employees.

OSU Be Well

By emphasizing a culture of well-being, OSU Be Well supports individuals and the community in adopting and maintaining healthy behaviors that will improve quality of life. The aim is to make sustainable changes to the fabric of OSU that will result in a healthier community.

Faculty Staff Fitness Program

With a goal of providing accessible and enjoyable fitness for faculty and staff, the FSF Program averages 30-40 classes serving over 800 faculty/staff, GTA's/GRA's, spouses/partners, and retirees of the university each term. No membership fees are collected; a modest class fee is all that is charged. Consider it a fringe benefit of your employment at the university!

Dixon Recreation Center

Dixon Recreation Center is one of the main social hubs of activity on campus,  with facilities for all types of activities – from a 42ft tall climbing wall and several sand volleyball courts, to cardio rooms and multi-purpose gym facilities. Visit the website for membership information.

Beaver strides

Whether you are just getting started on improving your physical fitness or are an active fitness walker; Beaver Strides has a program for you! All OSU students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in a variety of programs for encouraging fitness walking, socially or individually – including group walks over the lunch hour.

 

Funding Opportunities

 Grant Forward

Grant Forward is an online grant search service aimed at increasing the coverage of grant opportunities by providing a resource to researchers seeking new opportunities.

OSU Office of Sponsored Programs

The Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) is responsible for proposal submission for sponsored research, scholarship, instructional and other activities at Oregon State University, and research compliance as it relates to sponsored activities. Functions include proposal review, monitoring institutional compliance with terms and conditions, official institutional signatory, policy and procedure development, training, compliance activities related to research administration, and general funding opportunity assistance.

OSU Professional Faculty/Instructor Development Funds

Professional Faculty/Instructor development funds are given to members of the faculty of OSU to enable the recipients of such funds to keep current in their professional fields and improve upon their abilities within the academic field.

Volunteer Opportunities

Volunteer opportunities are a great way to connect with others, as well as participate in meaningful activities catering to particular interests and skills – not to mention have fun doing something good for the community.  LBCC offers a comprehensive list of organizations dedicated to serving others in a wide variety of fields.

 

National Resources

 Office of Women in Higher Education

The American Council on Education’s Office of Women in Higher Education (OWHE) provides the national direction for women’s leadership development and career advancement.

Higher Education Resource Services

Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) provides leadership and management development for women in higher education management.

National Postdoctoral Association

Providing a national voice and seeking positive change for postdoctoral scholars.

 

International Resources

 Institute of International Education: Women’s Leadership Initiative

IIE includes the Center for Women’s Leadership Initiative, which provides opportunities for women worldwide to participate in cutting-edge training, professional development and exchange programs and pursue higher education. Through the WLI programs, women develop and join networks of peers, mentors and experts and serve as effective leaders in the public and private sectors around the world.

Professional Development

Oregon State University provides a variety of professional development opportunities throughout the year.

Professional Faculty Leadership Association

PFLA is the Professional Faculty Leadership Association, an organization for Oregon State University, that is concerned about professional faculty issues, is committed to improving our profession, and capturing the skills, enthusiasm, and vision of its members throughout the university.

Center for Teaching and Learning

Enhancing the OSU teaching and learning environment by modeling, communicating, and advocating for the application of research-based pedagogical practices. Offers events, funding, faculty showcase, and other resources.

OSU Faculty Library Instruction

Provides library instruction, assistance with data management, and workshops to develop academic skills. The full library workshops for graduate students and faculty list past and current offerings as well as guides and handouts.

OSU Today

Today in the News Media is a synopsis of some of the most prominent coverage of OSU people and programs. News includes upcoming professional development activities and events.

Technology Across the Curriculum (TAC)

TAC's mission is to help faculty and staff succeed at improving educational quality. TAC offers webinars, workshops, and resources.

Writing Intensive Curriculum Program

Offers faculty resources, events, and seminars related to the Writing Intensice Curriculum Program.

Academic Success Center and Resources

Academic resources and programs students and scholars can learn from.

Extension Service Scholars

Oregon State University has scholars at all the different Oregon State University Extension Service locations (website) around Oregon. Scholars at these locations can use the following links to search for resources in their area. View a map of locations (pdf).

extension services map

Resources

Oregon State University Extension Service Information

The Oregon State University Extension Service celebrates over 100 years of educational outreach. From the beginning, OSU Extension's mission has been to convey research-based knowledge in a way that is useful for people to improve their lives, their homes, and their communities.

Current Scholar Orientation Information

Orientation information geared toward international scholars on the OSU Corvallis campus but can be applicable to scholars in different cities in Oregon.

Driving in Oregon

Link to the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicle's website.  Learn about driver license requirements.

Google Maps

Get maps, driving, walking, or public transportation options if you need to get somewhere.

211info

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Frequently Asked Questions

Below are frequently asked questions that new international scholars and faculty to Oregon State University usually ask. Please review the questions below and the other information on the International Scholar and Faculty Services orientation website. The fastest way to get an answer to a question you cannot find is to send us an email.

 

How do I get an Oregon State University Identification Card?

The OSU ID Card is the official identification card for students, faculty, and staff. It functions as a meal card, library card, access card, and more.

http://oregonstate.edu/international/atosu/scholars/id-cards

 

How do I get a Campus Tour?

Campus tours are offered daily for new students, scholars, and visitors to become familiar with the OSU campus.

http://oregonstate.edu/visitosu/

  • The Campus Visitor Program, 108 Kerr Administration Building
  • 90 minute guided walking tours are Monday to Friday, at 9am, 11am, 1pm and 3pm.
  • No appointment necessary!

 

How do I access the OSU Library?

The Valley Library, located in the heart of campus, offers computers, study space, resources and materials to meet your needs.

http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/

  • Library’s School Term Hours:
    • Monday through Friday: Open 24 hours
    • Saturday: 10am-10pm
    • Sunday: Opens at 10am, no closing hours
    • *These hours can change on holidays or other special dates
    • *Bring your OSU ID to use the library, especially from 12am-7am
    • Computer Help Desk
    • Reference and Circulation
    • Trained staff to help with questions
    • Multimedia Services
    • Computers, printers, and copiers
    • Equipment loan
    • Public use computers and internet

 

How do I access Dixon Recreation Center and gym?

Dixon Recreation Center is the on-campus recreation center which supports the OSU community’s physical activity and wellness needs.

http://oregonstate.edu/recsports/dixon-recreation-center

  • To Sign Up (scholars and families are eligible):
  • Access
    • Bike Shop, Climbing Wall, Courts, Café, Locker Rooms, Childcare, Pool, Indoor Track
    • Weights, Equipment, Rental, Classrooms, Conference Rooms, And more!

 

Can I rent sports or recreation equipment on campus?

Located at the east entry to Dixon Recreation Center, the Adventure Leadership Institute™ offers equipment rental for:

  • Backpacking and Camping,
  • Mountaineering,
  • Rafting,
  • Canoeing,
  • Rock or Ice Climbing,
  • Bouldering,
  • Bike Repair & Loan Program,
  • Ski or Snowboard Rental,
  • And Other Rental

http://oregonstate.edu/recsports/equipment-rental-bike-shop

 

Are there fitness classes for faculty and staff only?

The Faculty Staff Fitness (FSF) program, run by The College of Public Health and Human Sciences, provides over 30-40 classes each term for faculty, spouses, partners and OSU community members.

  • To Sign Up:
    • http://health.oregonstate.edu/faculty-staff-fitness or 541-737-3220
    • Classes Include:
      • Aerobics, Swimming, Kickboxing, Pilates, Yoga, Weight Training, Dancing: Salsa, Bollywood, Swing, Zumba, Sport conditioning (several types), Golf, Tennis, And many more!

 

How do I get connected with social activities and programs on or around campus?

 

Where can I share about my culture and country?

The Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center, 128 SW 9th Street in Corvallis: events, groups and resources for people from all countries and cultures – including families with children!

http://www.cmlcenter.org/

Open Monday to Friday 10 am - 5 pm and Saturdays by appointment. 541-754-7225

  • Knitting Classes, Gardening, International Food, Language Tutoring, Local Resource Guide
  • Cultural Events, Connections for Translating

 

Where can I get connected with a group that enjoys interacting with international people?

Crossroads International is a group of volunteers from the community that help enrich the experience of international students and scholars.

  • Conversation School for Women, Friendship Groups , Activities, Networking, Field Trips and Outings, Guest Speakers, Child Care

Contact: Sandy Riverman at sandy.riverman@oregonstate.edu, 541-740-8801 or http://oregonstate.edu/international/crossroads/home

 

Where can I learn or practice English?

There are many English language learning opportunities for scholars, students, and dependents in the Corvallis area.

http://oregonstate.edu/international/atosu/scholars/learn-english

 

Where is the Corvallis Library?

Corvallis Benton Country Public Libraries

645 NW Monroe Ave
Corvallis OR 97330

Monday - Thursday 10 am - 8 pm

Friday - Saturday 10 am - 6 pm

Sunday closed

http://www.thebestlibrary.net

  • Free membership, Books and Audio Books E Books, Movies/DVDs, Music, Programs and Events, And More!

 

What is there to explore in Oregon State?

How do I get around Corvallis and America?

Bus System: http://www.corvallisoregon.gov/index.aspx?page=167

HUT Shuttle to Airport: http://www.hutshuttle.com/

AMTRACK Train: http://www.amtrak.com/home

Greyhound Bus: http://www.greyhound.com/

 

How do I set up my ONID computer account?:

http://oregonstate.edu/international/atosu/scholars/account-set#onid

 

How do I print my I-94 card?:

https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html

The following information is required to retrieve your Admission (I-94) number which shows your arrival in the United States. Enter the information as it appears on the travel documents you used to enter the United States. You may need this card at the Social Security Office, and Department of Motor Vehicle.

  • Name, Birth Date, Passport Number, Country, Most Recent Date of Entry, Class of Admission

 

Department of Motor Vehicles:

Get a driver’s license or Oregon Identification document here.

http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/Pages/offices/corvallis.aspx

Corvallis DMV
870 NE Circle Blvd

Corvallis, OR 97330

Families and Dependents

Oregon State University supports scholars that wish to bring their families and dependents to the United States. There are many things to consider when you move your family to another place. We have compiled many of the common resources for your convenience.

Common Questions

 

Things to Consider

Before bringing your family with you to Corvallis,  you should consider the added expenses for medical insurance, medical  care, living expenses, and perhaps school-related expenses. Make careful  financial plans before you arrive; Support for each dependent (spouse or  child) for one year in Corvallis is estimated to be over $5,000. There is limited University housing for families at OSU and there is a  long wait before an on-campus apartment is available. However,  off-campus housing is generally available for families with children,  but not necessarily close to the campus. The average cost of a  two-bedroom apartment is $800-$900 per month. Please note that not all  apartments will rent to families with children.

 

Resources for Families

 

Who qualifies as a dependent?

Dependents are the primary international scholar's spouse or an unmarried minor child under 21 years of age. Dependent visa types will vary depending on the primary scholar’s visa type. Please see Bringing Dependents for more information.

 

How do I bring my dependents (spouse and/or child) to the United States?

Please see Bringing Dependents for more information and application procedures and forms.

 

How do I bring my other family members to the United States?

Family members or friends that are not your direct relative are not considered a dependent. Non-dependent family members will need to apply for a B visitor visa to visit the United States or a different visa type. Please see Bringing Dependents for more information.

 

What benefits do my dependents have? What rules must they follow?

Dependents have different employment and educational benefits depending on their visa type. Please see Dependent Benefits for more information.

Bringing Dependents

International scholars and faculty have various options on bringing dependents to the United States and Oregon State University. A dependent is defined as the spouse or children under age 21 of the primary visa holder.

J-2 | H-4 | E-3D | TD | B Tourist Visa for Non-Dependent Family | Non-OSU | Other Visa Options

 

J-2 Exchange Visitor Dependents

J-1 Scholars have two options of how to invite family to come to OSU to visit. The J-2 dependent visa, or the B Tourist Visa.

J-2 Dependent Visa:  Family members can come as J-2 dependents of the J-1 scholar.  Only the J-1 scholar’s spouse and children (under the age of 21) may come to the US as J-2 dependents.  The J-2 dependents will be able to stay in the US as long as the J-1 scholar maintains status and remains in the United States.  The scholar and family will have to prove to Oregon State University and the US Consulate that they have enough financial resources to stay in the US for the entire length of the J-1 scholar's program.   The J-2 dependents will also have to prove ties to their home country (such as a home, a job, family members still in the home country, etc) and proof of relationship at the US consulate abroad. 

For more information look at the website for the US Consulate where the family will apply for a visa.  Dependents of J-1 scholars who are subject to the Two Year Home Residency Requirement will also be subject to the Two Year Home Residency Requirement (scholars can check the lower left hand corner of their DS-2019 and their US visa to find out if they are subject to this requirement).

Benefits of Applying for a Tourist Visa rather than a J-2 visa: Tourist Visas may be preferable for family members of J-1 scholars who are subject to 212 (e), the Two Year Home Residency Requirement, in order to avoid the family also being subject to the Two Year Home Residency Requirement.  Tourist visas may also be preferable for families who will be visiting OSU for a short period of time, in order to avoid having to prove funding for the family for the entire duration of the J-1 scholar’s program and paying for required health insurance.

How to Apply:

Scholars can request the J-2 DS-2019 when they fill out their initial application to be a J-1 scholar at OSU, or after they arrive in the US using the J-2 Dependent Application. Once the J-1 US visa is issued outside the US, the DS-2019 for J-2 dependents cannot be issued until the J-1 primary visa holder enters the US and checks-in at OSU. The application requires the following materials:

 

H-4 | E-3D | TD

Visiting scholars and international employees should check with an Immigration Employment Specialist for information about applying for H-2, E-3D, and TN dependent visas.

 

B Tourist Visa / Non-Dependent Family

Family members that do not qualify for dependent status (dependent means the spouse or children under age 21) may be able to apply for a B tourist visa. The tourist visa program length is a maximum of 6 months.  Family members have to prove to the US Consulate that they have resources to cover the cost of the trip and prove ties to their home country (such as a home, a job, family members still in the home country, etc). 

For more information look at the website for the US Consulate where the family member will apply for a visa.  Tourist visas may be preferable for family members of J-1 scholars who are subject to 212 (e), the Two Year Home Residency Requirement, in order to avoid the family also being subject to the Two Year Home Residency Requirement.  Tourist visas may also be preferable for families who will be visiting OSU for a short period of time, in order to avoid having to prove funding for the family for the entire duration of the J-1 scholar’s program and paying for required health insurance.

How to Apply:

 

Other School Immigration Record

If you are at OSU on a non-OSU visa, please contact your program's immigration officer for more information on bringing dependents.

 

Other Visa Options

Dependents may want to apply for a different visa type all together. Dependents that meet the requirements may be eligible to apply for a J-1 Research Scholar category, J-1 Student Intern category, H1-B employment visa, F-1 student visa, and other visa types.

Dependent Benefits

Dependents of international scholars and faculty may have various benefits depending on their visa type such as employment authorization or authorization to enroll in school.  Please check the regulations regarding the dependent's specific visa category.

Enrollment | Employment | Initial EAD | Social Security Number | Extension EAD

 

Enrollment Information

International dependents may want to take a class or classes at Oregon State University or a different institution during their stay in the United States.

 

Employment Authorization

J-2 and E-3D Dependents: are eligible for employment authorization only if the dependent has applied for work authorization and received an Employment Authorization Document.

Note: Only students registered for at least one credit at OSU are eligable for on-campus student employment positions

 

Applying for an Initial Work Authorization

Employment authorization must be applied for through United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by using the I-765 form. USCIS will generally authorize J-2 or E-3D employment for one year at a time, but not beyond the end date of the J-1's DS-2019 or E-3 program.  Work authorization starts and ends on the dates shown on the EAD and is valid only as long as the J-1/E-3 is maintaining status.

Who can apply?:

  • J-2 spouses and children (14 or older) are allowed to apply for work authorization. Understand Oregon child labor laws.
  • E-3D dependent spouse can work in the US, however the E-3D child cannot work in the US under the dependent visa.

Under what conditions can they apply?

J-2 and E-3D visa holders are eligible to apply for employment authorization from USCIS as long as the following conditions are met:

  • both the primary and dependent maintain valid status
  • income from employment is not used to support the primary J-1 or E-3 (sample letter)

Employment may:

  • begin AFTER receiving an employment authorization document (also referred to as an EAD card) from USCIS
  • be full-time or part-time

 

 

Social Security Cards

After Employment Authorization is granted from USCIS, the J-2 or E-3D can apply for a social security card by bringing the following documents to the Social Security Office in the area:

  • Original DS-2019
  • Valid passport
  • Current I-94 Arrival/Departure form
  • One additional piece of identification (establishing identity and age such as a U.S. visa or country identification card)
  • Employment Authorization Document (EAD) issued by USCIS

More information about Social Security Cards.

 

Applying for an Extension of Work Authorization

An extension of the Employment Authorization Document must be filed with the I-765 form with all supporting documentation each time an extension of employment authorization is necessary (including a copy of the previous EAD card). Since the EAD cannot be issued for longer than the validity of the DS-2019 or E-3 program, any necessary extension of program must be processed prior to the application for extension of employment authorization document.

In order to avoid interruptions in J-2/E-3D employment authorization, it is important to file the Form I-765 for extension of employment authorization sufficiently in advance (but no more than 120 days in advance) so that the extension application is approved before the expiration of the current grant of authorization. Employment authorization expires with the expiration of the EAD, and the mere filing of an application for new authorization does not permit employment during the adjudication process. If the current EAD has expired, the J-2/E-3D must cease employment until receiving the new EAD.

Schooling for Dependents

Dependents of international scholars are eligable to enroll in school, courses, or English programs while in the United States.

Children Attending School | Enrolling in Academic Courses | English Programs

 

Preparing Your Children for School in Corvallis (FAQ)

 

Schools in Corvallis and Philomath

Corvallis and Philomath School District Sites

In order to enroll your children in Corvallis Public Schools, you will need to bring documents and immunization certificates from your home country. For more information, contact the Corvallis School District at 541-757-5811.

 

How do I know which school my child will attend?

If you are not sure about which school attendance area you live in, please call the school district office, 541-757-5811. School district policy allows parents to request the school they would like their children to attend. Parents of students on transfer are responsible for transportation to and from school unless space is available on a district bus that travels an appropriate route. If you plan to register your child at a school outside the attendance area, request a student transfer form when you register your child.

 

What do I need to bring to register?

To complete the registration forms, you should bring:

  • A copy of your child's complete immunization record, including information about when your child received the following required immunizations:
  • 5 doses of DTP vaccine
  • 4 doses of polio vaccine
  • 1 dose of MMR vaccine at or after 15 months of age
  • 1 dose of Hib vaccine required between 15 months and before five years of age
  • Second dose of measles containing vaccine
  • Hepatitis B series (3 doses)
  • Chicken pox vaccine or disease history
  • Names and phone numbers of three friends or relatives to be called in an emergency if you can't be reached
  • Name and phone number of your family physician
  • Proof of birth date: birth certificate, hospital certificate or passport (Students eligible for kindergarten next year must be five years old on or before September 1)

 

How will my child get to school?

Children who live close to school may walk or be transported by parents. Those who live one mile from the building (unless some hazard exists, such as a busy highway) may ride the bus that takes all elementary students to and from school in the morning and afternoon. Parents of children in half-day programs, however, will need to provide their own mid-day transportation.

 

What supplies will my child need?

Supply lists vary from school to school. Check with your school. Remember school offices are closed from the end of June until mid-August. District-wide lists published in the Gazette-Times or posted in stores may not reflect the specific needs of your child's classroom.

 

Medical and Immunization Information

Oregon law requires that children be adequately immunized against diphtheria tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, hepatitis B, and rubella. On registration day parents must bring a child's immunization records to school. School staff will then advise you about needed immunizations. Most of them will need to receive a booster dose of diphtheria/tetanus vaccine and polio vaccine to meet the requirements of the law. Those who have not had one dose of measles/mumps/rubella vaccine will need one dose.  Visit the Oregon Department of Public Heath's Vaccines And Immunizations website for additional information.

To be ready for school, make plans now to have your child immunized. Please do one of the following:

  1. Make an appointment now with your family physician.
  2. Make an appointment with the Benton County Health Department at 541-766-6835. Vaccine costs range based on income level. No one is denied service if unable to pay. All county residents use Health Department services regardless of income level.
  3. Plan now to comply with Oregon's School Immunization Law. Call for appointments with your doctor or the Health Department. If you have questions about immunization requirements call your child's school or the Health Department.
  4. You also are urged to get a physical examination for your child. The Pupil Medical Record form is available at the school. Since clinics and doctors' offices are very busy during the late summer, you are encouraged to get physical examinations and immunizations early in the year.

Information concerning physicals and immunizations is available at:

Benton County Health Department
530 NW 27th Street
Corvallis, Oregon 97330
Phone: 541-766-6835

 

Enrolling in Academic Courses

Certain international scholar dependents are allowed to enroll in full-time or part-time academic programs or courses.

 

English Language Opportunities

Learn more about local English programs and conversation groups in the Corvallis area.

Programming and Community

International scholars, dependents, and supporters are invited to join programming and events geared towards the international scholar and faculty population. If you are a community member or organization interested in hosting an event with or for the scholar population at Oregon State University, please contact the International Scholar Advisor for advertising and partnership.

Get Involved!

There are so many ways for the OSU international community and the larger community to connect, enjoy meaningful exchange of information, and form friendships. The following list shows key OSU and INTO OSU programs along with well established and welcoming community organizations.

Gatimu and world map with kids

KristinaMilaj

Crossroads Conversation School

OSU Programs Crossroads International Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center

Upcoming Events

Upcoming events and activities are highlighted on the OSU International Scholar Community facebook page.

Community Involvement

We are always looking for ways to get the Corvallis community involved with our scholar population. Please contact us if you are interested in working with or supporting the scholar population. Our scholars come from a variety of backgrounds and are often adult researchers or instructors, student interns, postdoctorate students, graduate students, and families.

Past Events

A few highlights of past programming and events include the following:

  • local trip to pick blueberries
  • walking tour of Corvallis and Farmers Market
  • international scholar and faculty reception
  • department contact Q&A
  • scholar focus groups
  • international scholar support group
  • programming posted on the OSU Scholar Community facebook page

Participant Experiences

Participant experiences will highlight OSU Exchange Visitor participant experiences and featured stories about the ISFS office at OSU.

Participant Experiences

This page highlights current scholar experiences and stories. There will be more media and material soon. Please contact us if you are a perspective scholar or department who would like to connect with scholars from a specific country or academic program; we will try to put you in touch.


International Scholar Reception

scholar conversing with others

President Edward Ray and Provost Sabah Randhawa held their annual reception honoring international faculty and visiting scholars during International Education Week 2013.

The Oregon State University CH2M Hill Alumni Center was filled with over 182 international scholars and faculty, sponsors, supporters, and families. As the crowd socialized, children participated in activities with OSU KidSpirit, and the International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) office took this opportunity to interview scholars about their experiences and research at OSU. Over 18 individuals participated in the interviews and the highlights will be shared on the ISFS website in the future.

President Edward Ray and Provost Sabah Randhawa’s speeches emphasized the following accomplishments and partnerships through the ISFS office:

  • During the last academic year, nearly 400 international scholars, and faculty engaged in research and teaching at OSU, while over 100 international students engaged in internships ranging from the famed Global Formula Race Team to the NASA AirMOSS Project for the Hydrologic Science Team.
  • Each one of OSU’s extension offices, experiment stations, and research centers were sites for international scholars, faculty or interns. All of OSU’s colleges engaged in international exchanges.
  • International Scholar and Faculty Services secured work authorization for thirteen new tenure-track faculty and secured permanent residence for ten faculty, ensuring that they can continue to enrich the research mission and the excellence of OSU.
  • Close to two-hundred OSU faculty sponsored J-1 Exchange Visitors, providing them with diverse research and cross-cultural experiences; sponsors opened their labs, and in some cases, their homes to the visitors.


If you would like to know more about the programs the OSU International Faculty and Scholar Services sponsor, please visit our website at http://oregonstate.edu/international/atosu/scholars.

 

 


International Scholar Focus Group

Image of words relating to focus group study

Adria Zampich-Gibbs from the International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS), and Marian Moore from Career Services at Oregon State University coordinated a focus group meeting with over 12 international faculty, researchers, post-docs, and student interns during International Education Week.

The international scholars came to Oregon State University as Exchange Visitors on the Department of State’s J visa. The J-1 Visa provides countless opportunities for international candidates looking to travel and gain experience in the United States. The multidimensional programs enable foreign nationals to come to the U.S. to teach, study, conduct research, or participate in an internship; scholars may be at OSU for a few weeks to several years.

The focus group was designed to gather information about international scholar’s adjustment to American academic culture and living in the United States and to determine what programs are needed to better serve international scholars who are hosted by OSU. The focus group’s questions related to the scholar’s experiences in academic life, preparedness to coming to the United States, challenges, and relationships with colleagues.

The scholars had positive things to say about their sponsoring professors and OSU; many of the scholars stated that they chose to conduct their program at OSU because of existing partnerships or that their research focus was similar to an OSU professor’s focus. Scholars noted they were a surprised at the diversity at OSU, the friendly relationship between supervisor and scholar, and the casual program atmosphere.

The scholars brought up concerns around difficulties transitioning to life in America, cross-cultural communication misunderstandings, and English language concerns. These are common concerns that international students and scholars face when transitioning to a new culture and lifestyle.

The next steps will be for staff in the ISFS office to create programming and resources to address scholar’s concerns and needs. Suggestions recommended included starting a learning community and support group for scholars, updating the orientation website so materials and information are easy to access, and to have programming that introduces American culture and the Oregon area.

Please continue to watch the ISFS website and OSU International Scholars Community facebook page as these suggestions take place over the next few months.

 

 


Past International Researcher Returns to OSU as a Fully Funded PhD Student

Rodrigo standing  in front of cattle

Rodrigo da Silva Marques is a current international Ph.D. student at Oregon State University in the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center located in Burns, Oregon. He has been working under Dr. Reinaldo Cooke’s supervision since April 2013. However, Rodrigo’s experience at OSU began back in 2011, when he came as an international visiting scholar to conduct research with Dr. Cooke for 12 months.

In September of 2011, Rodrigo arrived in Oregon following the completion of his M.Sc. degree in Animal Sciences from the Universidade de Sao Paulo – ESALQ (Brazil). During his 12-month internship, Rodrigo helped supervise several research studies which focused on beef cattle production; he participated in field work, laboratory analysis, data interpretation, and publishing research results. Upon the conclusion of his internship, Rodrigo authored and co-authored several journal articles and research abstracts which contributed significantly to his professional and scientific development.

After returning to Brazil, Rodrigo was awarded a full scholarship from the Brazilian government to return to Oregon State University and pursue a Ph.D. degree. This accomplishment was directly associated with the research experiences that Rodrigo acquired during his initial internship which enriched his resume as well as his academic skills. Rodrigo’s return to OSU as a Ph.D. student fully funded by the Brazilian government is a strong example of one of the many benefits that the Exchange Visitor program brings to OSU students, scholars, faculty members, and departments; thus the entire university system.

To learn more about how the J-1 Visa Exchange Visitor program provides countless opportunities for international candidates looking to travel and gain experience in the United States, please visit: http://j1visa.state.gov/programs

If you would like to visit with Rodrigo about his research experience through the Exchange Visitor program, and now as a Ph.D. student, he can be reached at: marquesr@onid.oregonstate.edu


International Student Intern Spends Summer Contributing to NASA AirMOSS Project at OSU

Lara Founini dressed in full bug jacket

Dressed in a full bug jacket with integrated head netting, long sleeve shirt, gloves and rubber boots, Lara Founini traveled to her field work site in 90 degree F (32 degrees C) weather riding an ATV and walking over five miles (8 kilometers) through difficult, wet, and mosquito infested terrain. This is how international student intern, Lara Founini, chose to spend part of her summer by contributing to the NASA AirMOSS Project for the Hydrologic Science Team of Oregon State University.

Lara is an Exchange Visitor from Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse- National Engineering Institute of Electronics, Computer Science, Hydraulics and Telecommunications (INPT-ENSEEIHT) in France. Lara elected to do a summer internship at Oregon State University’s Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering for three months. Lara’s responsibilities included data evaluation, writing software code, and participation in field work. The field work included installation of three soil sensor profiles at the Southern Old Aspen site, Saskatchewan, Canada. This site will be flown over by a NASA research aircraft carrying an experimental P-band radar system to evaluate soil moisture using remote sensing. "This summer internship program at OSU gave me the opportunity to be part of a huge environmental project launched by NASA: the AirMOSS project” Lara explains, “I was able to work both in the field and on the post-processing part”.

Lara was highly praised by her supervisor, Professor Richard H. Cuenca. He states “Lara has made a significant contribution to the NASA AirMOSS project… and her performance was excellent in all aspects of the work”. He continues to explain the continuing impact of her work by commenting “at this minute I am working with the computer code she worked up to produce graphics for a presentation for the NASA AirMOSS Science Team meeting at Harvard Forest next week!” Further questions about the NASA AirMOSS Project for the Hydrologic Science Team can be directed to Richard Cuenca at: richard.cuenca@oregonstate.edu

Information about the Exchange Visitor Student Intern Program can be found at: http://oregonstate.edu/international/atosu/scholars/j-1

 


 

Exchange Visitor Enrichment Programming

Lauren Zimbelman, the International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) Program and Event Coordinator, was busy this past summer designing events to involve international scholars, faculty, and interns in the Corvallis community.

In July, for example, ISFS hosted a trip to a blueberry farm on the outskirts of Corvallis to pick local produce and blueberries. Scholars and their families enjoyed picking and even sampling a variety of fresh fruits. At the end of the day, everyone returned with buckets (and stomachs) full of the delicious fruit. The drive home was characterized by discussion of dishes that could be made with blueberries and comparisons to other fruits in participants’ home countries.

Weekly walking tours of downtown Corvallis have been a primary activity of the summer programming as well. During the hour-long walks, Lauren spoke about local history, American culture, and practical knowledge about living in America, all while viewing Corvallis’ historic buildings, local art, and architecture. The walking tours ended at the Corvallis Saturday Market for scholars to explore. Through these walking tours, historical information is combined with useful everyday tips and an open forum for questions of all kinds. This provided an opportunity for new international scholars to connect with the city, get a sense for the Corvallis community, ask questions, and get to know each other in a casual environment.

Lauren Zimbelman states that the implementation of these programs has led to rich and engaging conversations and the activities have been fun to plan and facilitate. ISFS will continue to offer ongoing programming which engages scholars socially, academically, culturally, and in the community.

Article written by: Lauren Zimbelman and Adria Zampich-Gibbs


 

Visas and Immigration

International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS) is the central campus resource for advising international scholars & faculty on visa and immigration issues. This section contains information for international scholars and faculty on immigration rules, regulations, and processes.

Visa Categories

A list of the most common visa categories that ISFS at Oregon State University supports.

Applying for a U.S. Visa

Directions to apply for a J-1 Exchage Visitor visa. Please contact our office for information applying for H1-B or other visa types.

Visa Delays and Security Clearances

Explanation of issues that may cause problems or delays in the U.S. visa application process.

Immigrant Visa and Permanent Residency

A brief overview of the process of permanent residency.

U.S. Immigration System

Purpose of the U.S. Immigration System

The United States immigration system regulates the entry of foreign nationals into the country and provides pathways for academic study, employment, and naturalization.

Regulations governing the U.S. immigration system are published in the federal register of the United States Congress. Interpretations, commentaries, and guidance may also be provided by related government agencies.

Immigration Status

Foreign nationals are admitted into the U.S. in an immigration category that is appropriate for the purpose of their visit. Common visa categories at OSU include:

  • Academic Study (F-1 student)
  • Academic Exchange (J-1 student)
  • Research (J-1 research scholar or student intern)
  • Employment (H-1B, TN)

The immigration status, also sometimes called the "visa status" is established at the Port of Entry upon arrival using a visa issued at U.S. consular office or embassy abroad and the appropriate accompanying immigration documents. A foreign national may change to another immigration status by making a new entry into the country, or in some cases by petitioning to USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services).

Visa

A visa allows a foreign national to request entry into the U.S. Foreign nationals must apply for a visa at a U.S. consular office or embassy abroad. A visitor may hold several different visas but may only enter in one immigration status.

Administration of Programs and Benefits

The U.S. Department of State administers the J-1 exchange program. This program is designed to foster cultural and academic exchange between the U.S. and other nations.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) administers the F-1 student program. This program is designed to allow foreign nationals to complete a specific academic objective, such as a degree program, in the U.S. There are three branches under DHS with which a student or faculty will interact; These are the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CPB).

The Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), under ICE, administers the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). SEVIS is used to issue immigration documents to F-1 and J-1 students and to report certain information about their program to USCIS.

USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services) is responsible for processing petitions for employment benefits, resinstatement to a valid visa status, and permanent residency.

Enforcement of Immigration Regulations

ICE is responsible for ensuring compliance with immigration regulations by schools, employers, and foreign nationals. Students who violate immigration regulations may be investigated by ICE and lose their visa status. Schools and programs that violate immigration regulations may lose their ability to host international students and exchange visitors.

The United States immigration is governed by federal regulations and administered by difference agencies and programs. The information below provides a general outline of the immigration system.

Citizenship and Immigration Overview

An overview of the immigration system and the major departments and agencies that administer immigration programs and benefits.

Visa Categories

Information about visa status, along with a list of the most common visa categories that ISFS at OSU supports. The Bureau of Consular Affairs lists all visa types here.

SEVIS (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System)

Information about the system used to maintain information on international students and exchange visitors.

Glossary of Terms

Explanation of common immigration terms.

Applying for a Visa

Below are the directions to apply for a J-1 Exchage Visitor visa. Please contact our office for information applying for H1-B or other visa type.

How to Apply for a J-1 Visa

Initial international Exchange Visitors will need to apply for a U.S. visa in order to enter the United States to begin their program. Continuing Exchange visitors may need to renew their U.S. Visa while traveling abroad during their program. Explained below are the procedures and considerations to remember.

Initial Visa

Visa Renewal

Documents needed to enter the US

Issues for OSU employees applying for visas abroad

Visa Delays & Security Clearance

 

Initial J-1 U.S. Visa

Initial international Exchange Visitors who are outside the United States will need to apply for a J-1 US Visa in order to enter the United States to begin their program.

Procedure for Applying for an Initial Visa:

  1. The prospective visiting scholar will need to receive sponsorship from an Oregon State University (OSU) department. The OSU department will work with the International Scholars and Faculty Services (ISFS) office to produce a form DS-2019, Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) status. These forms indicate that you are being invited to enter the United States as a visiting scholar at OSU. You will need to work with your sponsoring department to apply for these documents.
  2. Once you have your J-1 DS-2019 eligibility documents, you will need to pay the I-901 Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) fee. See this link http://www.ice.gov/sevis/i901/index.htm for additional information. Print and take your SEVIS receipt to your visa appointment.
  3. Schedule a visa appointment at a US Consulate office. Refer to your local US Consulate office's Web site for a list of documents they will require. Though all US Consulates are governed by the same general guidelines, each US Consulate has its own procedures for applying for a visa and processing times vary.

Dependents: Scholar's dependents will need to apply for dependent visas. Dependents will have to present all of the documents required for the scholar's visa, as well as proof of marriage for the spouse and proof of parenthood for children. Any child who is 21 years of age or older cannot enter the United States on a dependent visa.

Canadian Citizens: Canadian citizens do not need a US visa to enter the United States but do need to have an approved travel document, DS-2019, and proof of I-901 fee payment to be admitted into the US.

Change of Status or Transfer: Scholars who are currently in the US and have applied for a change of status or transfer of status do not need to leave the US for the sole purpose of applying for a visa abroad.

Visa Renewal

International visitors who travel outside of the US must have a valid visa (for their current non-immigrant status) in order to re-enter the US. If a scholar's visa will expire prior to re-entering the U.S., or if the scholar has used all entries permitted by the visa, or if the visa does not match the current non-immigrant program category, the scholar will need to apply for a new visa while outside of the U.S.

Scholars who are currently in the US and have a valid status document (DS-2019, I-797 Approval Notice, etc) do not need to have a valid visa stamp in their passport. The sole purpose of the visa is for authorization to re-enter the US after traveling abroad. A valid status document is the only authorization necessary for an international visitor to legally remain in the US after being legally admitted (with a visa which has since expired). International visitors should not leave the US for the sole purpose of applying for a US visa abroad.

Procedures for applying for a visa renewal are similar to procedures for applying for an initial visa. Though all US Consulates are governed by the same general guidelines, each US Consulate has its own procedures for applying for a visa and processing times vary. The scholar should check the Consulate's Web site at which he/she will apply for their specific application procedures.


Documents needed to enter the US

You will need to be prepared to present the following documents to the immigration officials at the United States port of entry (POE) into the U.S., be prepared to present the following items to immigration officials:

  • Valid passport (valid for at least six months)
  • United States Visa Stamp
  • Status Document (DS-2019, or I-797 Approval Notice)
  • Financial Documentation of the source & dollar amount of your funding

 

Issues for OSU employees applying for visas abroad:

  • Timing considerations
    Some US Consulates have backlogs for visa interview appointments. International Student & Faculty Services (ISFS) highly recommends scheduling your visa interview as soon as possible to avoid having to wait for an interview appointment. US Consulates usually have instructions for booking interview appointments on their web site.
  • Applying outside your country of residence
    If you intend to apply for a J-1 visa in a country other than your country of citizenship, ISFS highly recommends checking the US Consulate's web site to verify that they will issue J-1 visas for Third Country Nationals.  Recent changes in visa issuance have led some countries to change their policies regarding issuing visas to Third Country Nationals. Learn more on the US-Visa website.
  • Visa Delays & Security Clearance
    Be aware, if you are in a research field that may be considered of US national security interest, you may face serious delays receiving a visa while a background check is being conducted. It is impossible to predict how long a background check might take (one week to 6 months), and it is not possible for any agency to intervene to expedite the background check.  Read more about visa delays & security clearances here.

Visa Delays & Security Clearances

Visa Delays - Frequently Asked Questions

What is it about the U.S. visa application process that causes people to get "stuck" outside the U.S.?

All individuals who apply at a U.S. Consulate or Embassy abroad for a U.S. entry or re-entry visa are screened before the visa is issued, regardless of nationality. After the events of September 11, 2001, no consular post wants to make the mistake of issuing a visa to an individual who should not get one.

The consular post conducts an initial review of the application and interviews the applicant about his/her planned activity in the U.S. It is at this initial stage that clear and concise information about the student's or scholar's teaching, research, or other activity should be explained. In most cases, the visa is issued within a matter of days or weeks.

Issues that may cause problems or delays in the visa application process:

  • The applicant has not spelled his/her name consistently on all documents (passport, visa application, supporting documentation). This can cause delays and confusion. The name given on the visa application and supporting documentation should be exactly the same as the name listed in the passport.
  • The applicant has not read and followed the tips and guidance on the website of the U.S. consular post having jurisdiction over the visa application; this can cause delays or denial.
  • The consular post cannot understand the kind of work the person is doing and officers cannot assess the risk/benefit of granting the person a visa. A security clearance will likely be requested if the field is unclear.
  • The applicant is from a country considered to pose a risk or is working in a field that is considered "sensitive" in some way, or if the Consular Lookout (CLASS) system turns up a "hit" on his/her name. The consular officers may tell the individual that a security advisory opinion (SAO) is needed. The consular post will send the applicant away telling him/her that the security advisory opinion will take an undetermined period of time and he/she will be notified when it has been completed.

What happens when a security advisory opinion (SAO) is requested?

The consular post asks the Department of State in Washington, D.C. to initiate the process of requesting clearances from various government agencies and databases including the FBI, CIA, Drug Enforcement Agency, Department of Commerce, Office of Foreign Asset Control, Interpol, the national criminal and law enforcement databases, the DOS Bureau of Non-proliferation, and others.

The Bureau of Non-proliferation is concerned with technology transfer and other issues. This bureau considers many technologies that people study and research at OSU to be "sensitive" technologies with possibly risky applications or at risk of being exported. It is important to understand this in order to understand why OSU researchers are subject to these clearances.

How can we prevent this from occurring?

Although discretion to request SAOs always rests with the consular post, what follows will well-prepare the student/scholar for travel:

  • Students/scholars should follow all directions from the Consulate where they intend to apply for a visa stam and list their name consistently on all documents.
  • Students/scholar should read all ISAS/ISFS Travel Information
  • Students/scholars who are already at OSU should discuss their travel plans with ISAS/ISFS before leaving the U.S.
  • Scholars should be prepared to present a packet of information to the Consulate if asked for additional information, including:
    • Letter from advisor, see details below
    • Copy of most recent CV
    • Copies of a few of latest publications, if available
  • Departments should provide the scholar with a brief, concise letter from the faculty sponsor or other department official describing the nature of the research. See an example letter here.

What should be done if a student or scholar has been stuck outside the U.S. with no security clearance for over 30 days?

First, report the delay to International Student Advising and Services (for students) or International Scholar and Faculty Services (for scholars). If the applicant is still awaiting the security clearance and visa 90 days or more after making the application, please notify ISAS/ISFS again.

Unfortunately, congressional offices are unable to help expedite visa issuance. The Department of State considers this to be a matter of national security and will not circumvent the security advisory opinion process under any circumstances. However, a combination of efforts on the part of congressional representatives, institutions such as OSU, and higher education associations has resulted in high-level awareness of the problems and there are on-going efforts for improvement.

What do we do about salary and benefits for a graduate student or scholar who is already on appointment at OSU and is unexpectedly gone for many months?

OSU departments, laboratories, and centers should decide on a case-by-case basis how to handle this issue. Decisions about whether to place someone on unpaid leave, charge vacation days, or terminate employment should be made at the departmental level.

Immigration Regulations and Responsibilities

Non-immigrants are responsible for understanding and complying with U.S. regulations governing their visa category and status. Below is a summary of important regulations international scholars and faculty must follow.

J-1 Exchange Visitor | TN Employee | H-1B Employee

 

Responsibilities of J-1 Exchange Visitors at Oregon State University

Exchange Visitors (EVs) in J-1 status are responsible for understanding and complying with U.S. regulations governing the J visa status. The Exchange Visitor’s responsibilities (22 C.F.R. Part 62) include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Engage only in the Activities Permitted for the Exchange Visitor Category TypeEach category has a definition and expectations for the activities of the exchange visitor, which must be met. For example a Research Scholar or Professor is here to perform research or teach; a Student Intern is expected to follow the Training/Internship Placement Plan.
  2. Report Address Changes to International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS) All J-1 EVs must report changes of address within 10 days of the address change to ISFS. ISFS needs to report the address for all J-1 EVs to the US Department of Homeland Security through SEVIS.
  3. Maintain Adequate Health Insurance:  EVs must have health insurance for themselves and all J-2 dependents throughout the entire program participation period and stay in the US. EV’s health insurance policies must meet the health insurance requirements of the Department of State.  Failure to maintain appropriate insurance coverage will result in termination of the EV’s J-1 program. Refer to attached Health Insurance Information Form for details.  
  4. Report Any Changes in Program to ISFS: J-1 programs are specific to the program description, department, and sponsor approved at OSU on the initial J-1 application.   EVs must notify ISFS whenever there is a change in their program. 
  5. Receive Transfer Authorization Prior to Leaving OSU: In some cases J-1 EVs may be eligible to transfer their J-1 program to another US SEVP program.  EVs must receive transfer authorization from ISFS before leaving OSU; contact ISFS one month in advance for transfer procedures.
  6. Apply for a Program Extension Prior to the DS-2019 Expiration: If the OSU sponsor would like to extend the J-1 program beyond the end date listed on the DS-2019, they must apply for an extension with ISFS. The maximum program length depends on the EVs category: Research Scholars or Professors have five years, Short-Term Scholars have 6 months, Student Intern or Specialists have 12 months maximum.
  7. Maintain a valid DS-2019, Passport, and I-94 card while in the US: Exchange visitors and any dependents are at all times expected to maintain a valid DS-2019, valid passport, and I-94. The passport must be valid for a minimum of six months from the DS-2019 end date.
  8. Employment ONLY with ISFS Authorization: J-1 Exchange Visitors may only work with authorization from ISFS and the OSU sponsor. The employment must be directly related to the objectives of the exchange visitor program, be incidental to the primary program activities, and must not delay the completion date of the J-1 program. Unauthorized employment is a violation of program status; an exchange visitor's participation is subject to termination when he or she engages in unauthorized employment.
  9. Obtain Travel Signature Prior to Traveling Outside the US: If an EV will travel outside the US and then return to the US to resume his/her J-1 program, an International Scholar Advisor must sign the DS-2019 prior to travel.  In addition, the EV’s passport must be valid for a minimum of six months from the date the EV will re-enter the US, and the scholar must have a valid J-1 US visa that is valid on the date of re-entry.  EVs should be aware that they must not leave their J-2 dependents in the US for a period longer than 30 days.
  10. Depart the U.S. within the 30-Day Grace Period and Report Departure to ISFS: EVs must inform ISFS when they have concluded their program and will be leaving OSU. EVs with Duration of Status (D/S) listed on the “Until” field of their I-94 must depart the US within 30 days of the Program End Date listed on the DS-2019.  If an EV completes their J-1 program earlier than the Program End Date, the 30 day grace period applies to the date that the J-1 program was completed and the EV needs to report this early completion of program to ISFS.
  11. Two Year Home Residency Requirement: EVs subject to the Two Year Home Residency Requirement (212(e)) will be required to return to their country of Legal Permanent Residence for a total of 2 years OR receive a waiver of the 212(e) before they will be eligible to obtain a work visa (H-1B, L-1) or Permanent Residency in the US.  After a waiver of the 212(e) is recommended by the U.S. Department of State extensions and transfers are NOT permitted.  Before applying for a waiver, discuss your case with ISFS.
  12. Bars to Further Program Participation:
  • 24 Month Bar:  EVs in the J-1 Researcher or J-1 Professor categories cannot return to the US in the category of J-1 Researcher or J-1 Professor until 24 months have passed since the EV completed his/her J-1 program.
  • 12 Month Bar: EVs who have been in any J status (J-1 student, J-2 dependents, etc.) for at least 6 months cannot become a J-1 Research Scholar or Professor until they have been outside the US for at least 12 months.
  • Student Interns: are limited to one internship per degree level.

 

Responsibilities of a TN Employee at Oregon State University

TN employees at Oregon State University must comply with U.S. federal laws and regulations governing TN status. Please contact an International Faculty & Scholar Advisor at International Scholar & Faculty Services if you have any questions.

  1. Report Address Changes to International Student & Faculty Services (ISFS) 
  2. Report Employment Changes to the ISFS: The terms of employment in TN status are very specific.  The US Department of State (DOS) approves the TN program for the specific department, salary, duties, and dates listed on the initial TN letter of offer.  The TN recipient is NOT authorized to change employment without authorization from ISFS.  This restriction includes changes in position duties, changes in pay rates, and changes of sponsoring departments within OSU.  If the TN employee anticipates a change in the research or employment, the sponsoring department should notify ISFS immediately, prior to the change in employment. 
  3. Apply for an Extension Prior to Expiration of Current TN: The TN employee and host department will be responsible for extensions of the TN employee’s status.  TN status can be extended either by returning to the home country and re-entering the US or by applying for an extension of status in the US.  Applications for extensions should be filed 4 months before the end date of the original TN status.  For more information on extending TN status from within the US contact an ISFS Advisor.
  4. Report TN Extension to ISFS and OHR:  The TN employee should send a copy of the new I-94 card to ISFS upon renewing TN status at the border. The TN employee and host department must fill out an I-9 update form to update the employee’s work authorization status, the I-9 should be sent to the Office of Human Resources (OHR).
  5. Report Departure Date and Reason to the ISFS:  The TN employee and host department are responsible to notify ISFS of the TN employee’s departure when the scholar leaves OSU.  If the employee’s record is not properly closed with Immigration, it could lead to complications for the scholar in future visits to the United States.
  6. Depart the U.S. Immediately at End of Employment: TN employees must depart the U.S. by the date noted on the I-94. 

 

Responsibilities of an H-1B Employee at Oregon State University

H-1B employees at Oregon State University are responsible for learning, understanding, and complying with U.S. federal laws and regulations governing H-1B status. Please contact an advisor at International Scholar & Faculty Services if you have any questions.

  1. Obtain Travel Documents When Traveling Abroad: H-1B employees who will travel abroad should contact ISFS to receive copies of documents which will be necessary for re-entering the US. ISFS will retain the original I-797 Approval Notice in the employee’s file.
  2. Report Address Changes to US Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS):  U.S. federal regulations require all H-1B scholars to report a change of address to USCIS within 10 days (of the address change) by filling out the AR-11 form online.  See www.uscis.gov; click on “FORMS” on green menu bar.  
  3. Report Employment Changes to the ISFS: The terms of employment in H-1B status are very specific.  The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) approves the H-1B program for the specific department, salary, duties, and dates listed on the initial H-1B petition.  The H-1B employee is NOT authorized to change employment without authorization from ISFS.  This restriction includes changes in position duties, pay rates, and/or sponsoring departments within OSU.  If the H-1B employee anticipates a change in conditions of employment, notify ISFS immediately. 
  4. Participate Only in Unpaid Consulting: H-1B employees are permitted to make occasional speeches and lectures at other institutions or at conferences, as long as the activities are not paid (either monetary or any other material gain), and are incidental to the employee’s employment at OSU.  H-1B employees can be reimbursed for expenses incurred in connection with travel to other institutions for conferences.  This is not considered employment, as long as the payments are truly reimbursements for expenses and not disguised compensation.
  5. Apply for an Extension Prior to Expiration of Current H-1B: The H-1B employee and host department will be responsible to file applications for extensions on behalf of the H-1B employee.  Applications for extensions should be submitted to ISFS 5-6 months before the end date of the original program.  If ISFS does not receive an extension application 2 months before the end date of the original H-1B approval, there are likely to be gaps in employment eligibility.
  6. Report Departure Date and Reason to the ISFS:  The H-1B employee and host department are responsible to notify ISFS of the H-1B employee’s departure.  This is especially important if the employee leaves OSU prior to the end date of the H-1B approval.  If the employee’s record is not properly closed with Immigration, it could lead to complications for the individual. If the department is unable to employ the H-1B employee for the duration of the H-1B status,  the department is responsible for offering to cover the responsible cost of return transportation to the employee’s home country.
  7. Depart the U.S. Immediately at End of Employment: H-1B employees must depart the U.S. by the date noted on the I-94 record.  Usually the employee must leave the US the same day that the H-1B approval expires, though in some cases a 10 day grace period is noted in the passport. The H-1B employee may ask for the “10 day grace period” at the Port of Entry when re-entering the US from a trip abroad.

Update Address

All international faculty and scholars are required to notify US Immigration within ten days when they have changed their living address while in the United States.

  • J-1 scholars must report a change of address to International Scholar & Faculty Services within 10 days of the move. ISFS is required to provide your current address and other data to the federal government electronicall through the SEVIS system.
  • H-1B, O-1, and Permanent Residents must report a change of address to USCIS within 10 days (of the address change) by filling out the AR-11 form online.
  • You may also need to change your address within the Oregon State University database system.

Traveling Outside the US

 

Before traveling outside of the United States all international visitors should verify that their immigration documents are in order. Scholars should consider the following.

 

Do you need a visa?

 

If a you intend to visit a country other than your home country, contact the consulate or embassy for the country you intend to visit to inquire whether you will need a visa. Learn about the the procedures and timeline for visa applications. Embassies of Other Nations in the U.S.

 

Is your passport valid?

 

Passport must be valid at least 6 months beyond the date you plan to re-enter the U.S and, ideally, should be valid at least six months beyond your intended stay in the US. If a you need to renew you passport, contact your home country's embassy in the U.S. and learn about the procedures and timeline for passport extensions. Embassies of Other Nations in the U.S.

 

Is your US visa valid?

 

All international visitors who travel outside of the US must have a valid visa (for their current non-immigrant status) in order to re-enter the US. If your visa will expire prior to re-entering the U.S., or if you have a single entry visa, you must apply for a new visa while outside of the U.S. The only exception to this regulation is if you are traveling to Canada or Mexico for less than 30 days on the Automatic Extension of Visa Vadility. For more information on applying for a visa abroad, see the visa information page.

 

What documents do you need to bring with you?

 

International visitors must have documents verifying their status in order to re-enter the US. Check the links below for more information about travel documents necessary for each status

All scholars should be prepared to present a packet of information to the Consulate if asked for additional information, including:

  • Letter from sponsoring professor (example)
  • Copy of most recent CV
  • Copies of a few of latest publications, if available

 

Security Clearances & Visa Delays

 

Be aware if you are in a research field that may be considered of US national security interest you may face serious delays receiving a visa while a background check is being conducted. It is impossible to predict how long a background check might take (one week to 6 months), and it is not possible for any agency to intervene to expedite the background check. Learn more about Security Clearances and how to help prevent visa delays here.

 

Automatic Extension of Visa Validity

If you will travel to Canada, Mexico or the adjacent Caribbean Islands (other than Cuba) for 30 days or less, you may be eligible for automatic extension of validity of visa. In other words, you may re-enter the U.S. with an expired U.S. visa stamp in your passport. This benefit also applies to individuals who have changed non-immigrant status in the U.S. and whose visa is still in the category in which they entered the U.S. (the visa is considered “converted” as well as “extended”).

If you choose to apply for a U.S. visa in Canada or Mexico and are denied, you will not be eligible for automatic extension of validity of visa. Nationals of Iran, Cuba, Sudan, and Syria are not eligible for automatic extension of validity of visa. Please email an international scholar advisor before using automatic extension of validity of visa.

To be eligible for the automatic extension of validity of visa provision, you will need to have maintained and intend to resume your nonimmigrant status, and you must have the following documents:

  • original I-94 card that you received upon your most recent entry to the U.S. or a copy of your most recent I-94 arrival record printed from https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html
  • valid status document (e.g. DS-2019, I-797 Approval Notice, I-20, etc.)
  • valid passport

Handout: 

U.S. Code of Federal Regulations  (22 CFR 41.112 Validity of Visa)

Travel to Canada

Based on your country of citizenship, you may or may not be required to have a visa for a short-term visit to Canada.

Check this list of countries that require Canadian visas.

Effective January 29, 2013, the Visa and Immigration Section at the Canadian Consulate in Seattle (United States) is closed and services transferred to the Canadian Consulate in Los Angeles on in New York.

For more information about how to apply for a visa to enter Canada, visit their website.

Automatical Extension of Validity of Visa Notice (pdf)

Departure

All international scholars must inform International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) of their departure from Oregon State University. If the scholar's program is not properly closed with USCIS and/or the Department of State, it could lead to complications for the scholar in future visits to the United States.

Review the details on the Scholar Notice of Departure Form for information specific to your visa status, e.g. grace periods, returning to the US in a different visa category, etc.

All employees and Exchange Visitors should complete the Scholar Notice of Departure Form and email it to isfs.advisor@oregonstate.edu at the completion of their program.

Additional Resources

On this page you will find other resources and information for international scholars, faculty, staff, and sponsoring departments.

Presentations on the OSU Campus

Warning: These presentations provide general information only and cannot substitute for individualized legal advice about your particular case. In the world of immigration, very small factual differences  can make a huge difference in your case. In order to receive such advice seek a qualified immigration attorney of your choice with which to consult.

Glossary of Terms

Term

Definition & Explanation

For More Information

Actual Wage

"Wage rate paid by the employer to all other individuals with experience and qualification similar to those of the H-1B employee for the specific employment in question."

See H-1B Application

Alien

Any person not a citizen or national of the US (as defined in INA)

 

B-1

B-1 visitor for business category.

Should be used only when there is no research collaboration with OSU

Click here for important B-1 information.

B-2

B-2 visitor for pleasure, also known as the "tourist" visa

It is very important to realize that the B-2 visa category is not suitable for official visits to the university. OSU cannot pay visitors on a B-2 visa.

Visit the Department of State's B-2 webpage

D/S

Duration of Status

Some nonimmigrants are admitted to the US for a specific period of time, others are admitted for a "duration of status", which is tied to the date on the status document. 

Sample I-94 card

DS-2019

Status document for J-1 and J-2 (dependent of J-1) status

Use this document, along with the I-94 card and passport, to meet I-9 requirements.

 

E-3

Australian Citizens in a Specialty Occupation

Click here for important E-3 information

Grace Period

Some visa categories allow the nonimmigrant to remain in the US for a specified grace period after their program end date. They may not participate in studies or research activities or work.

 

H-1B

Temporary Worker in a Specialty Occupation

Click here for important H-1B information

I-20

Status document for F-1 and F-2 (dependent of F-1) status

Use this document, along with the I-94 card and passport, to meet I-9 requirements.

 

I-797

Status document for H-1B and H-4 (dependent of H-1B) status

Use this document, along with the I-94 card and passport, to meet I-9 requirements. Note:  in some cases the I-797 includes an I-94 card.

Click here to see example

I-9 form

Employment Eligibility Verification form

I-9 establishes work authorization date. Work authorization ends when the 1st of the documents listed below expires (i.e. passport or status document)

Attach:

Copy of Form I-94

Passport ID page

Status Document

To be mailed to OHR with New Hire paperwork

Click here for the Employment Verification form

I-94 Record

Arrival Record

This record is given to all non-US Citizens/Permanent Residents who enter the US. Until April 30th 2013, this was a small white card that was stapled into the passport upon arrival and removed upon departure from the US.  As of April 30th 2013, the I-94 record is automated and is available to print from the CBP website.

There is either an end date listed on the I-94 OR the letters D/S, which means Duration of Status corresponds to the date listed on either the DS-2019 (if in J-1 status) or the I-20 (if in F-1 status)

CBP will stamp admission category, date of entry, and duration of status in passports at the Port of Entry.

Travelers may print out a paper copy of their I-94 card by accessing their record online at www.cbp.gov/I94 .

Click here to see sample af the paper form I-94.

Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)

Law that governs immigration issues.

 

J-1

DOS Exchange Visitor Program

Click here for important J-1 information

Labor Certification (PR)

A step in the Permanent Residency application process, used only when position is fulltime, tenure track and includes teaching duties.

Contact Jackie Bangs

Nonimmigrant

An individual who seeks to be admitted to the US for a limited period of time and with a purpose that is temporary in nature.

 

Nonimmigrant intent

US Consulate presumes that all applicants for visas intend to immigrate to the US, the applicant must prove otherwise (show ties to their home country) to be eligible for a nonimmigrant visa.

 

Non-resident alien

Another term for nonimmigrant

 

O-1

Workers of Extraordinary Ability

Contact Charlotte Ross, Director of ISFS

Permanent Resident

An alien who may lawfully reside in the US after having a petition for permanent residency approved.

 

Prevailing Wage

a salary that meets the average salary of similarly employed workers in the state of Oregon, determined by the DOL.

See H-1B Information Page

Required Wage

H-1B employer must agree to pay an H-1B employee the required wage rate, the higher of the actual wage and the prevailing wage.

See H-1B Information Page

Security Clearance

Part of visa application process at US Consulate

Click here for Visa Delays & Security Clearance Info

SEVIS

SEVIS is an Internet-based application that facilitates timely electronic reporting and monitoring of international students and exchange visitors (EVs) and their dependents in the United States.

SEVIS enables schools and program sponsors to transmit electronic information to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the

Department of State (DOS) throughout a student's or EV's program in the United States.

U.S. embassies and consulates also have access to SEVIS.

 

Status

A nonimmigrant alien must be in a nonimmigrant status while the are in the US

 

Status Document
(aka Enabling Document)

Status document is issued by OSU or by USCIS (as petitioned by OSU). The status document allows potential scholars to apply for a visa at US Consulate, to apply for entry to US at port of entry and to verify their nonimmigrant status from within the US.

Examples:

F-1 = I-20

J-1 = DS-2019

H-1B = I-797 Approval Notice

See samples of

I-20

DS-2019

I-797

Status expiration date

End date on status document and I-94 card.

 

TN

TN Professionals under NAFTA

For citizens of Mexico and Canada only

Visit the Department of State's TN webpage.  ISFS information coming soon.

Two Year Home Residency requirement aka 212(e)

The two-year home country physical presence requirement is one of the most important requirements of exchange visitor status.  Some J-1 exchange visitors and their dependents are subject to the 212(e).

Learn more about the 212(e) here.

US Consulate

Consular Affairs is charged with interviewing and issuing visas to all persons applying for entry into the US. Governed by the Department of State.

US Consulates

Visa

A visa stamp issued by the US Consulate, allows the bearer to seek entry into the US in a particular nonimmigrant visa category (i.e. F-1 or J-1)

Should not be confused with "status" and cannot be used for work authorization.

Click here to see sample visa stamp

Waiver of 212(e)

J-1 Exchange Visitors may apply for a waiver, but should be aware of important restrictions to their programs that will result.

Contact Jackie Bangs for more information.

WB

Visitors for business entering the US using the Visa Waiver Program

Visit the Department of State's VWP webpage

WT

Visitors for pleasure entering the US using the Visa Waiver Program

Visit the Department of State's VWP webpage

Acronyms

Acronym

Stands for

For more info

DHS

Department of Homeland Security

 

DOL

Department of Labor

 

DOS

Department of State

 

ISFS

International Student & Faculty Services

 

USCIS

United States Citizen & Immigration Services

 

VWP

Visa Waiver Program

 

EV

Exchange Visitor

 

Department Resources

International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS) is the central campus resource for hosting international visitors and/or hiring international employees, advising international scholars & faculty on visa and immigration issues, and providing resources to faculty and staff preparing to travel on behalf of Oregon State University.

It is our goal to support OSU departments as they host and hire foreign nationals. Our office assists departments and the Human Resources teams of OSU business centers with the process of securing US work authorization and employment-based permanent residence for international hires. If your department is interested in sponsoring an international visitor please see the information and procedures below.

Faculty and Staff perform an essential and dynamic role in the internationalization of the University whether it be through facilitating learning and interaction between domestic and international scholars, hosting a visiting international researcher, hiring an international employee, or participating (oneself) in a teaching or research opportunity abroad.

How do I…

Going Abroad?

Workshop and Training Materials

 

Determining a Visa Type

Visa Category Questionnaire

International Scholar and Faculty Services assists Oregon State University departments in sponsoring and applying for a U.S. visa on foreign national's behalf. The ISFS office can help departments determine a visa category and type.

One of the first steps for departments wishing to sponsor an international visitor or employee is to answer the following questions in regards to the visitor/employee's position and program and forward the answers to the ISFS office so we can determine the most appropriate visa category for their program at OSU.

Please keep in mind that it takes several weeks to months to process the paperwork for a status change or US visa depending on the category.

  • Will this be a paid position? 
    • Yes
    • No
  • If paid, search was: 
    • Open recruitment
    • Waiver of search
  • What is the title of the position at OSU?
    • Research Associate or Faculty Research Assistant
    • Professor, Assistant  Professor or Associate Professor
    • Instructor
    • Visiting Researcher (Affiliate or Courtesy Appointment)
    • Visiting Professor (Affiliate or Courtesy Appointment)
    • Visiting Trainee/Intern
    • Other
  • What country is the international visitor/employee from?
  • Is the international visitor/employee currently on a J-1 Exchange Visitor program at another university within the US?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Is the international visitor/employee currently employed at another university within the US?
    • Yes
    • No
  • If Yes, what status?
    • H1-B
    • J-1
    • F-1 OPT
    • Other
    • Unknown
  • When does this status expire?  (date, if known)
  • If unpaid, what type of research or duties would the visiting scholar/employee be pursuing while at OSU? 
    • Conducting research for their personal benefit
    • Conducting research for the benefit of OSU
    • Both
  • What are the dates of his/her visit or employment? (begin date and end date)
  • What degree does the individual hold?
    • PhD
    • MA/MS
    • BA/BS
    • None
  • Will the individual be enrolled in courses while at OSU?
    • Yes
    • No

Submit the response to each question to the ISFS office at ISFS.Advisor@oregonstate.edu and, if possible, please attach the visitor/employee’s CV and passport identification page with the submission. ISFS will follow up with any questions and the appropriate application materials and process.

Hiring International Employees

How do I hire an international employee?

  1. Recruitment:  Work with ISFS on the wording of the Position Announcement (pdf) for all tenure-track teaching positions. 
  2. Selection:  Select best candidate for position and provide offer letter, follow guidance on OSU online hiring system User Manual regarding wording for offer letter and follow-up email regarding US work authorization.
  3. If candidate requires assistance with US work authorization, select “NRA Review Requested” on OSU online hiring system .
  4. ISFS  will review the posting on the OSU online hiring system before communicating with candidate to determine the appropriate visa category to pursue.
    Non-resident aliens will fall into three groups:
    a) those for whom OSU can secure status and work authorization
    b) those who come with their own work authorization from another sponsor or status
    c) those who do not have their own work authorization and for whom we cannot secure status and work authorization
    We will encounter situations with individuals from the third group on occasion, at which time ISFS will consult with the Office of Human Resources and the Office of General Counsel.
  5. ISFS will contact department/business center to start the visa application.
  6. Department/Business Center submits visa application to ISFS, click here for visa categories and processing times.

Refer to Hiring FAQs, if additional questions please email the Immigration Employment Specialist.

Hiring FAQs

FAQs for Hiring Units | FAQs for Non-Resident Aliens (NRAs)

FAQs for Hiring Units

 

What is a Non-Resident Alien (NRA)?

For immigration purposes, a non-resident alien is someone who is not a citizen or permanent resident of the US. All NRAs must secure US work authorization prior to being eligible to begin working in the US.

 

What is a U.S. work visa? 

Please visit the USCIS website for more information.

 

Can I ask a non-resident alien (NRA) about their U.S. work authorization status during the interview process?

Due to the complexity of U.S. immigration rules, as of December 2013, OSU encourages hiring units to refrain from engaging in discussions with NRAs about their U.S. work authorization, I-9 documents, work visas, etc. For additional information, visit the ISFS webpage which contains an overview of hiring an international employee.

 

What do I do if the candidate starts talking about their visa status?

You can refer them to this general website about the visa categories used at OSU.

 

Who can answer I-9 questions? 

If candidates have questions about documentation for the I-9, refer them to the Office of Human Resources.

 

Do non-resident aliens need to meet ALL minimum and preferred qualifications before they can be offered a position?

No, they do not. However, if your recruitment was for a tenure-track position with teaching duties and the selected candidate was a non-resident alien requiring U.S. work authorization, the candidate would need to meet all mandatory qualifications and preferred qualifications, as stated in the job posting, at the time of selection before we could proceed with the preferred method of filing for U.S. permanent residence (PR).  This is important, since PR gives NRAs the ability to live and work permanently in the US.  Filing a "special handling labor certification" with the Department of Labor allows OSU to pursue a route to employment-based PR that is unique to teaching positions in higher education that is not overly burdensome for the NRA nor the hiring department. For additional information, refer to these guidelines.

 

Is it true that there must be NO minimally qualified U.S. workers who applied for the job before I can hire a non-resident alien? 

No. This only applies to a type of labor certification called Standard Handling through the Department of Labor. OSU rarely uses this type of labor certification.

 

What kinds of work visas can OSU apply for?  

There are a limited number of work visa categories in the U.S. immigration system. Please refer to the USCIS website for detailsVisit this webpage to see a list of commonly used visa categories used by OSU and to learn about timelines and fees. 

 

Who pays for the fees associated with securing U.S. work authorization? 

All H-1B, E-3 and permanent residence (I-140 form only) fees must be paid by the employer and may not be passed on to the employee.  This Department of Labor requirement does not apply to fees associated with other visa types that allow for work authorization (e.g. TN, F-1 OPT, J-1, J-2 with an EAD). 

 

Can OSU apply for H-1B status for any candidate? 

No. A variety of factors determine eligibility for H-1B Specialty Occupation visa status, as outlined on the H-1B information page. It can be difficult to secure H-1B status for positions that do not require a specific specialized degree in a particular field, i.e. classified and professional faculty administrative jobs.

 

Can someone with a valid EAD card work at OSU?

Yes, in most cases. Please consult with the Office of Human Resources for I-9 employment verification questions. 

 

FAQs for Non-Resident Aliens (NRAs)

 

Definition of a Non-Resident Alien (NRA)

For immigration purposes, a non-resident alien is someone who is not a citizen or permanent resident of the US. All NRAs must secure U.S. work authorization prior to being eligible to begin working in the US.

 

May I hire an attorney to secure US work authorization for me?

Individual employees may not hire an immigration attorney to represent OSU. All employment-based permanent residence petitions that require a job offer, H-1B and E-3 petitions must be processed by International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS).

 

I have questions about my current visa status. Can you advise me?

No, we cannot advise non-OSU employees, nor can we advise on personal immigration questions. However, we can offer general guidance about the types of work authorization we pursue for OSU employees.  After a signed offer letter is returned to your hiring department, we will contact you with a questionnaire to gather information that will help us determine what type of work authorization we will pursue for you.

Visa Categories

Below are the most common visit/employment type visa categories that International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) at OSU supports. Other visa categories may be supported by other departments on campus such as F-1 or J-1 student categories.

Non-Immigrant Visa Categories

B-1: tourists and business visitors (cannot be used for employment)

E-3: specialty occupation, Australian citizens only

F-1 OPT: optional practical training for recently graduated students

J-1: visiting professors, researchers, and student interns

H-1B: professional, specialty occupations 

O-1: outstanding worker (contact Charlotte Ross for O-1 information) 

TN: professional occupations; citizens of Mexico & Canada only

J-2 | H-4 | E-3D | TD : dependent type visas for scholar or faculty spouse/children

Other: F-1 and J-1 student visas are processed by the International Student Advising and Services (ISAS)

Immigrant Visa and Permanent Residency

PR: OSU permanent residency information and policy

Other Resources

If you are a U.S. Citizen Travelling Abroad, you may find the following resources helpful

Guest Lecturers and B-1 Business Visa

Overview | Eligibility | Visa Waiver Program | Resources | Visitor Support

 

Overview

Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), tourism, pleasure of visiting (visa category B-2), or a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2). Guest Lecturers to Oregon State University usually come on a B-1 Business Visa.

 

Who is eligible for a B-1 Business Visa?

  • Visitors who are either a professor, scientist, university president, business executive, etc.
  • The purpose of the visit is to attend a scientific, educational, or professional conference or to engage in independent research (not collaborative with OSU in any way--this requires a J-1 visa)
  • Visitors who will not receive salary/income or be employed by OSU
  • It is very important to realize that the B-2 visa category (Visitor for Pleasure), is not suitable for official visits to the university. OSU cannot pay visitors on a B-2 visa.

 

Visa Waiver Program

Travelers coming to the U.S. for tourism or business for 90 days or less from qualified countries may be eligible to visit the U.S. without a visa if they meet the visa waiver program requirements. Select Visa Waiver Program to learn more, and find out if your visitor meets the visa waiver requirements.

 

Resources

 

How do I…

 

Invite a B-1 visitor to OSU?

Prepare a letter of invitation which includes the pertinent information your visitor will need to apply for a visa. View a b-1 sample invitation letter (Word). 

 

Help a visitor get a B-1 Business Visa?

Provide a clear letter of invitation for your visitor (see above question). The visitor will then take that letter, along with a valid passport and supporting documents to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate that serves closest to the visitor's place of residence.

Pay a visitor?

The United States government permits academic institutions to provide honoraria and stipends to foreign nationals who enter the U.S. in B-1 (short-term business) status. However, there are several restrictions within the law. Federal law requires that:

  • the visitor is present in the U.S. in B-1 visa status

  • the academic activities at OSU must not exceed nine days;

  • the visitor has not accepted similar payments from more than five other U.S. institutions during the six-month period immediately preceding his/her visit to OSU.

Important: If the scholar will require an Individual Tax Identification Number (ITIN), it is recommended that the scholar apply for the ITIN well before their arrival to the U.S. as it can take 6 weeks or longer to receive the ITIN.  Information on applying for an ITIN can be found on the IRS Form W-7.

Additional Assistance:

Get library access for my visitor?

Complete and submit the Visiting Scholar OSU Libraries Account Application (PDF) to the Valley Library Reference Desk to sponsor library privileges for your visitor

Get an OSU ID for my visitor?

Visitors in B-1 status are not eligible for OSU ID numbers or cards.  

Get more information?

For more information regarding the B1 Visa visit the US Department of State’s Business Visa Center and its Visitor Visas - Business and Pleasure page.

J-1 Exchange Visitor Program

The purpose of the J-1 Exchange Program is to provide exchange visitors with "opportunities to participate in educational and cultural programs in the United States and return home to share their experiences, and to encourage Americans to participate in educational and cultural programs in other countries." CFR § 62.1 (b)

As the J-1 Exchange Program is sponsored by the Department of State (DOS) for the purpose of cultural and professional exchange, it may not be used for the sole purpose of employment.

 

J-1 Eligibility

J-1 status is very flexible. J-1 exchange visitors at Oregon State University can range from a post-doc researcher, a professor or researcher on sabbatical at OSU, a scientific collaborator, a guest lecturer, or a professor or researcher at OSU for up to 5 years. J-1 exchange visitors may be paid by OSU when such activities are part of his/her program.

The US Department of State has approved OSU to provide J-1 programs in the following categories: Professor, Research Scholar, Short-Term Scholar, Student Intern, and Specialist. Each category has requirements that a scholar must meet in order to be classified within the category. Please contact an International Scholar Advisor with information about the scholar and their position at OSU to determine which category best fits the exchange visitor's program.

 

Length of J-1 Authorization

The maximum period of time authorized for an exchange visitor depends upon the category into which their program is classified.

  • Research Scholar: 5 years
  • Professor: 5 years
  • Short Term Scholar: 6 months
  • Student Intern: 1 year
  • Specialist: 1 year

 

Employment Restrictions

The terms of employment for the J-1 visa are very specific. The Department of State (DOS) approves the J-1 program for the specific department, salary, duties, and dates listed on the initial J-1 program. The exchange visitor is not authorized to participate in a program or change employment without authorization from ISFS; this restriction includes working for a different department within OSU, changing position duties, or changing pay rates. If there is a change in the research or employment of the exchange visitor, the department should notify ISFS immediately.

 

Timing

Please allow 8 weeks between ISFS's receipt of the completed application and your exchange visitor's program start date.   While ISFS takes only 10 business days to issue the DS-2019s, exchange visitors need time to schedule their visa interviews and for the U.S. Consulate abroad to issue the visa stamp.

 

Department Responsibilities

The sponsoring department is responsible for providing:

  • cultural and professional exchange opportunities for the exchange visitor
  • campus privileges (such as use of the library, computing, parking, etc) These benefits can be extended to exchange visitors who will not be paid by OSU by offering the them a courtesy or affiliate faculty appointment. Courtesy and affiliate appointments for visiting scholars should follow the same OHR processes as domestic appointees.
  • evaluation of English, program evaluation, and Training/Internship Placement Plan required of exchange visitors in the student intern category. Requirements explained here.

 

Health Insurance

The Department of State (DOS) requires that all J-1 exchange visitors (and their dependents) maintain health insurance that meets DOS requirements for the entire length of their program. Exchange visitors are provided health insurance information by International Student and Faculty Services (ISFS) at the time that they receive their visa documents. If the department has questions they should contact an International Scholar Advisor in ISFS.

 

Extensions of the J-1 Program

Sponsoring professors are responsible to submit applications for extensions on behalf of the exchange visitor. Applications for extensions should be submitted to ISFS one month before the end date of the original program. Contact ISFS for more information about procedures for extensions of a scholar's program.

 

Mandatory Visa Check-In

It is a requirement of the Department of Homeland Security that all J-1 Exchange Visitors must check-in with the J program Responsible Officer in order to validate the program within 30 days of the Program Start Date on the DS-2019. This is vital to the Exchange Visitor's ability to enter, work, and do research in the US. If the Exchange Visitor does not attend the visa check-in appointment within 30 days of the program start date listed on the DS-2019, the Department of Homeland Security will terminate his/her J-1 status and the Exchange Visitor will not be eligible to enter the US. In addition, this can have negative affects on the Exchange Visitor's ability to secure future visas to the US.


 

J-1 Application Procedures

Complete applications only if you have contacted an International Scholar Advisor in ISFS and the J-1 visa category has been approved for your prospective international visitor.

Student Interns

J-1 Student Intern Program

The purpose of the J-1 Exchange Program is to provide exchange visitors with "opportunities to participate in educational and cultural programs in the United States and return home to share their experiences, and to encourage Americans to participate in educational and cultural programs in other countries." CFR § 62.1 (b)

The J-1 Student Intern Program is a category within the Exchange Visitor program for students who are currently enrolled in and pursuing studies at a foreign degree post-secondary academic institution outside the United States who plans to conduct an internship at Oregon State University.

Eligibility Requirements

Student Intern

  • Has verifiable English language skills sufficient to function on a day-to-day basis in the internship environment
  • Is currently enrolled in a post-secondary academic institution outside the US and in good academic standing
  • Will return to his/her home institution and fulfill and obtain a degree after completion of the internship program at OSU
  • Can show evidence of sufficient financial resources to support him/herself for duration of internship
  • Will comply with the insurance requirements set forth by the U.S. Department of State, and will purchase the necessary insurance before arrival in the United States

Internship

  • Exposes participants to American techniques, methodologies, and expertise and expands upon the participant's existing knowledge and skills
  • Does not duplicate the participant's prior experience or training received elsewhere
  • Is at least 32 hours per week
  • Fulfills educational objectives of the student intern's current degree-seeking program at his/her home institution
  • Does not exceed 12 months in duration
  • If paid, the student intern is responsible for securing permission from his/her academic advisor or dean at home institution

Sponsoring department

  • Verifies the student intern's English language proficiency through a telephone interview
  • The primary objective of the visit to OSU is to engage in a full-time internship of at least 32 hours per week
  • Provides student intern with opportunities for cross-cultural exchange
  • Evaluates student intern and submits written evaluation forms to ISFS on schedule

Other considerations

  • If the student intern wishes to take a class at OSU, s/he is limited to a maximum of 6 graduate credits or 8 undergraduate credits that are related to his/her academic field.  The intern will be responsible for enrolling as a non-degree seeking student.
  • Student Interns are eligible for an OSU ID card after they complete the mandatory check-in with ISFS. After check in ISFS contacts the ID Center and confirms the student intern's eligibility for Associate status, which extends access to campus privileges (e.g. the library) and an ONID account.
  • In some cases, interns may be paid as non-system students or on a stipend, sponsoring professors should work closely with their Business Center or OHR representative to determine the best method for the particular student intern's needs.
  • Some foreign institutions require their students to complete a contract outlining the internship program. More information on the contract approval procedures.

Timing

Please allow 8 weeks between ISFS's receipt of the completed application and your exchange visitor's program start date.   While ISFS takes only 10 business days to issue the DS-2019s, exchange visitors need time to schedule their visa interviews and for the U.S. Consulate abroad to issue the visa stamp.

J-1 Application Procedures

Complete applications only if you have contacted an International Scholar Advisor in ISFS and the J-1 Student Intern visa category has been approved for your prospective international visitor.

Fulbright Scholars

Faculty sponsors of international Fulbright Scholars are encouraged to follow the guidelines indicated below in order to help the scholars’ experiences be a success.  While International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) does not take part in the visa processing or direct support of Fulbright scholars, the Office of the Associate Provost for International Programs International Initiatives Coordinator is available to assist with questions and some areas of support.  Fulbright Scholars are also invited to the International Scholar and Faculty Reception each fall.

Pre-Arrival

  1. Complete courtesy or affliate paperwork (allows scholar to get ID and access to campus upon arrival, including getting office keys, purchasing a parking pass, etc.) See OHR policy, forms on OSCAR.
  2. Identify office space & computer access
  3. Assign a department contact to meet with Fulbright scholar upon arrival
  4. Schedule Fulbright scholar for a campus tour
  5. Consider assigning a graduate student to walk scholar to the key shop & ID center
  6. Send Fulbright scholar a link to ISFS Housing Resources webpage
  7. Schedule your first meeting with Fulbright scholar
  8. Consider holding a departmental welcome with faculty, staff, and graduate students for the Fulbright scholar. This gives everyone a wonderful opportunity to meet and learn more about who the Fulbright scholar is and what type of research they are pursuing.

Arrival

  1. Meet Fulbright scholar upon arrival
  2. Give Fulbright scholar a tour of the department and office space
  3. Introduce Fulbright scholar to faculty, staff, and graduate student (personally and via email)
  4. Assist Fulbright scholar in getting OSU ID card and keys
  5. Indentify a way for Fulbright scholar to get to Albany to apply for social security card

If Fulbright scholar does not have a courtesy appointment they will NOT have an ONID account, which means no remote access to the library or wireless connections on campus. Please consider giving your visiting Fulbright scholars a courtesy appointment rather than an affiliate appointment.

Links to Further Resources*

 

*while these pages are designed for OSU (i.e. not Fulbright) scholars and students, much of the information here is applicable and helpful for your visiting Fulbright scholar

E-3 Specialty Occupation

Departments wishing to hire an international employee should contact an International Faculty & Scholar Advisor at International Student & Faculty Services (ISFS) to determine which visa type best fits the position and employee. If ISFS determines that E-3 status is the most appropriate, the department should complete an E-3 Request Form (pdf) and submit it to ISFS.

It takes one to four months to secure E-3 status. A representative from the employing department at OSU should contact Jackie Bangs as soon as possible if E-3 status is being considered for employing an international employee.

E-3 Eligibility

E-3 visas allow employers to temporarily employ an Australian worker in the U.S. on a nonimmigrant basis in a specialty occupation. A specialty occupation requires the theoretical and practical application of a body of specialized knowledge and a bachelor's degree or the equivalent in the specific specialty (e.g., sciences, medicine and health care, education, biotechnology, and business specialties, etc...).

E-3 status allows employment of an international employee who has professional skills and a professional degree.  To be eligible for E-3 status the following conditions must be met:

Position:

  • Must be a "specialty" occupation requiring "theoretical and practical application of a body of knowledge in professional fields and at least the attainment of a bachelor's degree or its equivalent.

Department:

  • Must agree to pay, throughout the entire duration of employment, the higher of either the wage for similarly employed workers at OSU or the wage for similarly employed workers in the State of Oregon (as determined by the Department of Labor).

International Employee:

  • Must possess the degree specified
  • Must be an Australian national
  • Must possess " highly specialized knowledge and attain[ed]... a bachelor's or higher degree in the specific specialty" of the position.

Application Process

There are two methods for applying for E-3 status.

1. OSU applies to USCIS for a change of status from within the US.

  • ISFS prepares prevailing wage, Labor Condition Application and petition to USCIS.
  • Minimum processing time = 4 months

2. Applicant applies for E-3 visa at US Consulate

  • ISFS prepares prevailing wage, Labor Condition Application.
  • Minimum processing time = 2 months

Please refer to the E-3 application for additional information.

H-1B Employment Visa

Departments wishing to hire an international employee should review the International Employees page in order for International Scholar & Faculty Services (ISFS) to determine which visa type best fits the position and employee. If an H-1B is the appropriate visa category, the process can take anywhere from 2 - 6 months to secure work authorization.

H-1B Eligibility

H-1B status allows employment of a scholar who has professional skills and a professional degree. To be eligible for H-1B status the following conditions for the position, the department and the scholar must be met:

The Position:
  • Must be an unclassified position
  • Must require "theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge and attainment of a bachelor's or higher degree in the specific specialty or its equivalent"
The Department:
  • Must agree to pay, throughout the entire duration of employment, the higher of either the wage for similarly employed workers at OSU or the wage for similarly employed workers in the State of Oregon, as determined by the Department of Labor.
  • Must agree to pay for the reasonable costs of return transportation home for the scholar, if the scholar is dismissed from employment before the end of the authorized period of stay.
The Scholar:
  • Must be eligible for H-1B non-immigrant status (for example, not subject to the two-year-home-residency requirement from a prior J-1 program, nor have used all 6 years of H-1B eligibility on prior H-1B employment)
  • Must possess " highly specialized knowledge and attain[ed]... a bachelor's or higher degree in the specific specialty" of the position

Length of H-1B Work Authorization

Employers may petition for a maximum of three years of H-1B status at a time. H-1B visa regulations allow a worker to hold H-1B status for a maximum of six years. Time that an employee has spent in H-1B status at another employer and time spent in H-4 status deducts from their 6 years of eligibility. Departments should contact ISFS if unsure of the potential employee's remaining H-1B eligibility.

The beginning and end dates of employment listed on the H-1B application should reflect the length of funding for the position and the amount of time that the employee is expected to fill the position. H-1B application dates do not have to match the dates of the employee's academic appointment. H-1B applications are not limited to the current academic year, nor subject to the academic calendar.

Employment Restrictions

ISFS must receive approval of the H-1B petition from USCIS before the scholar can begin employment.

The terms of employment in H-1B status are very specific. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) approves the H-1B program for the specific department, salary, duties, and dates listed on the initial H-1B petition. The H-1B recipient is NOT authorized to change employment without authorization from ISFS. This restriction includes changes in position duties, changes in pay rates, and changes of sponsoring departments within OSU. If the department anticipates a change in the research or employment of an H-1B employee, the department should notify ISFS immediately, prior to the change in employment.

Extensions of the Program

The host department will be responsible for the filing of applications for extensions on behalf of the scholar. Applications for extensions should be filed 5 months before the end date of the original program. Contact ISFS for more information about procedures for extensions of a scholar's program. If ISFS does not receive an extension application 2 months before the end date of the original H-1B approval, there are likely to be gaps in employment eligibility.

Application Procedures and Timeline

Application procedures and timelines vary depending on the type of H-1B application. For more information, select the type of application being processed.

Permanent Residency

The following is intended as a brief overview of the process of permanent residency and does not contain all relevant information. More detailed information is provided on the ISFS website under the specific category of interest.

Employment-Based Permanent Residence

International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) provides administrative support services for employment-based permanent residence applications for OSU international faculty in permanent positions at the University. Only tenure-track academic positions or research positions designated as "permanent" and which have the full and unconditional support of the department/college are eligible for permanent residence petitions. As a general rule, the University will not support permanent residence applications for other occupational classifications; however, the Associate Provost for International Programs will consider exceptions on a case-by-case basis. Please consult OSU's Permanent Residence Policy for more information.

To initiate a permanent residence petition the department should contact Charlotte Ross, Director of ISFS. The request will be reviewed by the Associate Provost in consultation with the ISFS Director. The Associate Provost must approve OSU sponsorship of the petition before ISFS may begin the permanent residence process. The University reserves the right to withhold OSU sponsorship if the applicant does not meet the necessary criteria for an employment-based petition.  Any change in employment status during the application process (reduction of percentage of time, leave of absence, change in job title or duties, or termination) could result in withdrawal of the petition.

Employment-based permanent residence petitions for Oregon State University must be processed through ISFS.  In compliance with state law, the University does not authorize outside attorneys to represent its interests. Only the Associate Provost for International Programs may sign forms related to employment-based permanent residence applications filed on behalf of the University. 

At-A-Glance: OSU Employment-Based Visa Sponsorship

The following table shows the two categories of employment-based permanent residency sponsored at Oregon State University and a brief overview of the requirements for each:

Outstanding Professor or Researcher (pdf)

  • Nationally and internationally known in academic field
  • Considered outstanding in 3 of 6 categories
  • Minimum of 3 years experience in the field
  • Must have tenured, tenure-track or comparable position
  • Must be employed full-time

Members of the Professions Holding Advanced Degrees (pdf)

  • Must have teaching duties that involve classroom teaching
  • Must have been selected through open search process
  • Must meet prevailing wage
  • Must meet Dept of Labor criteria for selection
  • Must be employed full-time

Additional Resources:

Supporting Scholars

Sponsoring departments of international Scholars are encouraged to follow the guidelines indicated below in order to help the scholars’ experiences at OSU be successful.  While International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) does not take part in the direct support of scholars and student interns, they offer a variety of online resources and materials that sponsoring professors and departments can access and distribute to their scholars. General questions regarding Exchange Visitors can be directed to the International Scholar Advisor.

Pre-Arrival

  1. Complete courtesy or affliate paperwork (allows scholar to get ID and access to campus upon arrival, including getting office keys, purchasing a parking pass, etc.) See OHR policy, forms on OSCAR
  2. Identify office space & computer access
  3. Assign a department contact to meet with scholar upon arrival
  4. Send scholar a link to ISFS Housing Resources webpage and pre-arrival orientation information
  5. Schedule your first meeting with scholar

Arrival

  1. Meet scholar upon arrival
  2. Give scholar a tour of the department and office space
  3. Introduce scholar to faculty, staff, and graduate student (personally and via email)
  4. Schedule scholar for a campus tour
  5. Consider assigning a student assistant to walk scholar to the key shop & ID center to assist with access
  6. Provide scholar with scholar arrival orientation information (most set-up and access topics are covered on this website)
  7. Schedule scholar for the mandatory ISFS check-in and orientation
  8. Indentify a way for scholar to get to Albany to apply for social security card (if scholar is paid through OSU)
  9. Consider holding a departmental welcome with faculty, staff, and graduate students for the scholar. This gives everyone a wonderful opportunity to meet and learn more about who the scholar is and what type of research they are pursuing.

Sponsor Resources

International Scholar and Faculty Services welcomes the involvement of administrators and faculty in international scholar, faculty, and community programs and activities. Department sponsors and supporters play a central role in many aspects of the scholar experience. In order to assist administrators and faculty in addressing scholar  training issues, we have developed a list of resources. Please let us know if you have any other resources to add or contribute!

OSU Resources

  • Individual Development Plan: serves as a communication tool between scholars (postdoc) and supervisor(s), and provides a planning process that identifies both professional development needs and career objectives. The IDP opens communication, identifies expectations, establishes objective criteria for success, recognizes the importance of training and service, and is flexible to allow new opportunities to be pursued when they appear.
  • Getting Off to a Great Start: An integration guide for new OSU employees (Human Resources) has information about campus, benefit options, HR orientation, training opportunities, ideas for working with your supervisor, and self-guidance.
  • OSU Center for Teaching and Learning: Oregon State University Center for Teaching and Learning: Enhancing the OSU teaching and learning environment by modeling, communicating, and advocating for the application of research-based pedagogical practices.

Resources from the National Postdoctoral Association Library of Resources

Articles

Program Contracts

Some exchange visitor programs, specifically exchange visitors in the Student Intern category, need contracts or agreements completed before beginning the program. The contracts are usually requested by the foreign institution.

If this is the case, then the terms and conditions of the contract must be reviewed and signed by OSU's Procurement and Contract Services. Please follow the procedures below.

Procedures:

  • Scholar/Student Intern completes contract and sends it to sponsoring department.
  • Sponsoring Department reviews and vetts contract. The department will submit the contract to PaCS through email. By submitting the request through the Department, it informs Contract Services that the request/activity has been fully vetted by the OSU Department with the authority and responsibility for supervising the scholar's experience at OSU.
  • PaCS will review the contract. All requests are placed in a first-in-first out queue when received by PaCS. PaCs will review and contact the appropriate contacts with questions, changes, or approval.

Please contact OSU's Procurement and Contract Services withany additional questions.

Faculty & Staff Traveling Abroad as an OSU Employee

Faculty and staff traveling abroad as an Oregon State University employee may find the following resources useful when planning their travel.

Information for Employees who are not citizens or permanent residents of the US

If you are not a citizen or permanent resident of the United States, ensure your US immigration documents, including passport validity and necessary visa stamps, are in order well in advance of your travel date. Visit the International Scholars and Faculty Services (ISFS) travel website for information that is specific to your non-immigrant visa category and status.

OSU Risk Management

If you are traveling on behalf of the University, you must register your trip with the Office of Risk Management.  Learn about risks, global insurance and travel assistance coverage for working abroad.  Did you know the State purchases insurance for employees working abroad?

Export Control

Export control regulations are federal laws that prohibit the unlicensed export of certain commodities or information for reasons of national security or protections of trade.  Find out if your work abroad might be affected by visiting the Office of Sponsored Programs website.

U.S. Department of State

A must for anyone planning a trip outside the United States, including enrollment in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)..  Includes tips for travelling abroad, Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, what to do in an emergency, travel warnings, and travel advisories.

Passports

Double check that your passport will be valid for at least six months beyond your anticipated return to the U.S. and that your name matches you other photo identification.  If you need to renew or apply for a passport visit Travel.State.Gov's website.

Visas:  Do You Need One?

Country-specific information, including exit/entry requirements, location of the U.S. embassy, crime and security information health and medical conditions, drug penalties.  There are visa service providers who can assist with the visa application process, e.g. Visa Network, VisaHQ or Global Visas.

OSU Student Health Services Travel Clinic

OSU Faculty and Staff traveling abroad for business or research should schedule a pre-travel consultation at the SHS Travel Clinic, in addition to registering the trip at the Office of Risk Management. Student Health Services maintains membership in the International Society of Travel Medicine and provides international certificates of vaccination and other documentation that may be required for your travel.

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

Detailed travel health information for over 200 destinations, general information for travel vaccinations, diseases related to travel, what to do if you get sick or injured abroad, tips for staying healthy and safe.

Cultural Information

This guide by the OSU Library is intended to support the research, coursework, and special interests of students, staff, and faculty at Oregon State University to assist with research that is global or international in scope.

OSU Sabbatical Leave

Information about the policy and procedures for sabbatical leave while employed at OSU.

US Travelers Abroad and Travel Checklist

Bringing It All Back Home

Did you develop any new research relationships while abroad?  Did existing partnerships expand?  Let the Office of the Associate Provost for International Programs know.  

Other Resources

Contact Us

Contact International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS)

Purpose: ISFS assists faculty, scholars, and members of the OSU community with questions about immigration status, immigration regulations, and employment and permanent residency petitions.

Office Hours:  Monday through Friday; 8:00am-12:00pm & 1:00pm-5:00pm

University Plaza

Phone: +1-541-737-3006
Fax: +1-541-737-6482 Email: ISFS.Advisor@oregonstate.edu Website: http://oregonstate.edu/international/atosu/scholars
Physical Location: International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) 
University Plaza– Suite 190 (across from the International Living-Learning Center)
1600 SW Western Blvd.
Mailing Address: International Scholar and Faculty Services (ISFS) 
University Plaza – Suite 130
Oregon State University
1600 SW Western Blvd.
Corvallis, OR 97331
United States

International Scholar and Faculty Services Staff Directory

Staff Responsibilities

Charlotte Ross, Director
  • Permanent Residency  
  • H-1B  specialty occupation
  • O-1 outstanding worker
  • WB  Visa Waiver for Business
Jackie Bangs, Immigration Employment Specialist
  • H-1B specialty occupation
  • E-3 specialty occupation for Australian citizens
  • TN  "NAFTA visa" for Canadians or Mexicans in professional occupations
  • B-1 Visitor for Business
  • TraiNet
  • Advises departments and international employees and visiting scholars on regulations regarding employment at OSU.
Cindy Nair, Immigration Program Specialist
  • All visa type application processing
  • Scheduling check-in and orientation
  • Managing all general inquiries
Adria Zampich-Gibbs, International Scholar Advisor
  • J-1 Exchange Visitor Program
  • Scholar event programming and community involvement
  • Website

Making an Appointment

The International Scholar and Faculty Services staff members are available to discuss visa options, visa regulations, advise on immigration status and any other questions by scheduling an appointment.

Schedule an Appointment

To make an appointment to meet with an advisor, call 541-737-3006 or email. An advisor may refer you to other offices on campus for additional support as appropriate. If you are not able to keep your appointment, please contact our office in advance to reschedule.

General Inquiries

For a general or simple question, you may e-mail us at ISFS.Advisor@oregonstate.edu.  Include your full name and OSU ID number (as applicable) in your message, and state the topic of your question in the e-mail subject line. One of our staff members will respond to your e-mail.

Picking-Up Documents

If you need to pick up a document, please go to University Plaza - suite 130. Please note that this location is different than our physical location. The front desk staff member will have your documents for pick-up.

Employment-Based Immigration Petitions

Note: Unless OSU is processing your employment-based immigration petitions (H-1B, Permanent Residency, etc.), ISFS advisors cannot discuss general or specific questions concerning H-1B and permanent residency petitions.