Phl 302
Dr. Uzgalis
Winter 1996



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READING GUIDE: LOCKE'S ESSAY BK II cont.

  1. We acquire our idea of power:
    a. from the contemplation of God's supreme activity.
    b. from God and created spirits, but not from material objects.
    c. from the change in ideas constantly repeated, and the inference that the same things are likely to be changed in the same way by the same agents.
    d. from material objects.

  2. From material bodies we get:
    a. all our clear and distinct ideas of active powers.
    b. no idea of thinking and no clear idea of the beginning of motion.
    c. no obscure idea of motion.
    d. clear and distinct ideas of the beginning of motion but no idea of thinking.

  3. Locke's example of a man carried asleep into a room where there is someone he longs to see and speak to is intended to show that:
    a. there is a distinction between actions and passive happenings.
    b. there is a distinction between free and voluntary actions.
    c. there is a distinction between freedom and necessity.
    d. there is a distinction between freedom and liberty.

    4. According to Locke:
    a. freedom applies to the will because the will is a power.
    b. freedom does not apply to the will because the will is not an agent and freedom applies only to agents.
    c. the will is a agent and so is free.
    d. the will is a substance but not an agent.

    5. The distinction between simple and complex modes is that:
    a. simple modes are composed of simple ideas while complex modes are composed of complex ideas.
    b. simple modes are composed of simple ideas of different kinds while complex modes are composed of complex ideas.
    c. simple modes are composed of simple ideas of the same kind while complex modes are composed of simple ideas of different kinds.
    d. simple modes are qualities while complex modes are substances.

  4. Locke uses the example of the Indian philosopher who thinks the world rests on an elephant, which in turn rests on a great tortoise, to explain:
    a. the explanatory power of the distinction between primary and secondary qualities.
    b. the obscurity of our idea of substratum or substance in general.
    c. the superiority of European to Indian philosophy.
    d. the clarity of our conception of substance.

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