Home Page- CH 390 OSU

Environmental Chemistry

A course intended to teach the fundamental chemical principles involved in environmental phenomena


This is the home page for the course Chemistry 390- Environmental Chemistry. This course is being taught over the Internet during the SPRING term of 2013 and originates from the Chemistry Department of Oregon State University.


Information on the course

General Information

Overview of the Course

PART I ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND AIR POLLUTION

  • Acid Rain
  • PART III TOXIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    PART IV WATER CHEMISTRY AND WATER POLLUTION

     

     

     

    /POLLUTION AND PURIFICATION OF WATER

    PART V METALS, SOILS, AND WASTE DISPOSAL

     

     


    Welcome to Environmental Chemistry

    Welcome to the home page of the course Environmental Chemistry. This page contains information about this web course, as well as links to the course itself.


    What is this course?

    This course is a supplemental guide to the Baird and Cann textbook which is very good. The textbook covers the basic chemistry behind environmental problems dealing with air, energy, toxic organic chemicals, water, and other issues.


    What are the prerequisites?

    One year of college chemistry is required. One term of organic chemistry is required.


    Who may participate, and how much does it cost?

    Anybody in the world who is able to participate is welcome to do so. Also, to properly participate, you should have access to the various required materials listed in the next section.


    What materials do I need?

    The textbooks used in this course are:

     

    Homework Assignments

    The Baird and Cann textbook comes with a number of homework problems.

    The following problems should be attempted BEFORE beginning the course tests.

    1-1,3-1,3-10,AP 3-2,AP 4-2,,AP4-7, 5-6,5-7, 5-10,AP 5-3, AP 5-8, 6-1,AP 6-2,7-8,8-1,8-3,AP 8-1,9-2, 10-11,10-13, 11-5,,11-11,AP11-7,12-6,12-8, 13-6,AP13-1,14-11,14-12,15-7,16-1,16-4,AP 16-1, AP 16-3,

     

    To see if your solutions are correct refer to the Solutiuons Manual. If you have questions about this homework and the problem solutions, contact your instructor BEFORE beginning the tests.

     

     


    What are the class requirements, and how is this course graded?

    There will be three tests. The first one will be due 20 APRIL, the second one will be due on 10 MAY and the third one will be due on 7 JUNE. All tests are due at 1700 on the due date. The total number of questions on all the tests combined will be 50. The 50 questions will be keyed to the course learning objectives. 35 of the 50 questions are taken directly from the textbook. These questions are marked with a *. All you have to do is to look up the questions in the textbook, read the solutions in the solutions manual, adjust the solution to the new data in the problems and copy the answers into the tests. This will get you a C grade or an S grade if you are taking the course S/U. The remaining 15 questions are more advanced and depend on you being able to use the material in the chapters to solve new problems.

    All constants, equilibrium and otherwise, used in the test are taken from the values given in the Baird and Cann textbook.

    Grading criteria: 45 correct questions =A, 40=B, 35=C, 30=D, < 30=F. We don't give + or - grades or I grades

     

    These tests are just like in-class tests. You are not to collaborate with others in answering the questions. We cannot offer hints on how to work the problems. In an in-class test. would you ask a proctor about how to solve a problem? Like all proctors, we can clarify what is being asked in a question, but not how to answer it..

    Warning: Because of the large number of students enrolled in the Chemistry web courses, it is very difficult to answer student inquiries concerning content, etc during the last two-three weeks of the term. We will try our best to answer all content inquiries within 7 business days, but it may not be possible during the last two-three weeks of the term. We CANNOT answer inquiries during the last week of classes. Please plan on doing your work as soon as possible.

     

    A note about procrastination. Procrastination can be a big problem in this course. We are asked to do the tests in Blackboard 9.1. Blackboard 9.1 has known problems. It will occasionally lock up and the only practical way to cure the problem is to log out and log in some time later. Normally that is not a problem, EXCEPT if you are trying to do the tests on the last day. THEN YOU ARE SCREWED! ! Similar comments apply about computer problems on your end, illness, etc. BE SMART. Do the tests a week before they are due. DO NOT OPEN MULTIPLE COPIES OF A TEST AT ONCE. Blackboard may lock up and charge you with a try even though you have not submitted the test. DO NOT GIVE UNITS FOR ANY ANSWER. ALL ANSWERS ARE NUMBERS WITH NO UNITS. IF YOU USE UNITS BLACKBOA D WILL JUST SAY YOUR ANSWER IS WRONG. ENTER ANSWERS IN THE FORMAT 3.64e-05, or 0.0000364 DO NOT USE ANY OTHER FORMAT FOR THE ANSWERS.DO NOT WORRY ABOUT SIGNIFICANT FIGURES. Blackboard has tolerances built into the test protocol which will cover this.

    NOTE THAT IF YOU COMPLETE A TRY AT THE TEST AND START A NEW TEST, THAT WIPES OUT YOUR OLD SCORE !! ANY UNFINISHED TEST GETS A SCORE OF ZERO AND COUNTS!!

     

     

     

     

     

     


    What topics will be discussed?

    Here is the tentative list of topics to be discussed, in approximate order of introduction:

    Topic:


    How do I get help?

    Currently the primary way with which you will be given assignments and material will be having it posted on this webpage. The current way for you to communicate with your instructor is by email. Remember the tests are just that, tests. We are happy to answer general questions about the subject material and the learning objectives, or the kind of clarification questions that you would ask a proctor during an exam. We will not answer questions on how to work a specific exam problem. Please be sure that all course inquiries come from valid onid email addresses. We cannot answer questions from non-onid addresses.

     


    External Links

    Links:



    Course deadlines

     

    . THE FIRST TEST IS DUE 20 APRIL, THE 2ND TEST IS DUE 10 MAY AND THE THIRD TEST IS DUE 7 JUNE.

    ALL TESTS ARE DUE AT 1700 ON THE DUE DATE.

     

     

    Warning: Because of the large number of students enrolled in the Chemistry web courses, it is very difficult to answer student inquiries concerning content,, etc during the last two-three weeks of the term. We will try our best to answer all content inquiries within 7 business days, but it may not be possible during the last two-three weeks of the term. We CANNOT answer inquiries during the last week of classes. Please plan on doing your work as soon as possible.

    Course learning objectives

    Upon completion of the course, the student:

    1. will be able to state the 12 principles of green chemistry

    2. will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concept of % atom economy

    3. will be able to describe  the constituents of the atmosphere and the atmospheric regions

    5. will be facile in using the environmental concentration units for atmospheric gases

    6. will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the physics and chemistry of the ozone layer, including the absorption of light by molecules, the filtering of UV radiation by O2 and O3, the biological consequences of ozone depletion, the oxidation of ozone in the stratosphere, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and the catalytic processes of ozone destruction.

    7. will be able to discuss quantitatively Dobson units for overhead ozone, the annual Antarctica ozone hole, the activation of catalytically inactive chlorine, reactions that create the ozone hole, the size of the ozone hole, artic stratospheric ozone destruction, the role of chemicals that cause ozone destruction, and international agreements regarding these chemicals

    8. will demonstrate a quantitative knowledge of the chemistry of ground-level air pollution, including gas concentrations, photochemical smog, policies to reduce smog, catalytic converters, SO2 and H2S sources and abatement, the atmospheric chemistry of SO2, the role of particulates in air pollution, and the characterization of particulate matter.

    9. will demonstrate an understanding of environmental and health consequences of indoor and outdoor pollution, including acid rain, smog, particulates, and indoor air pollution.

    10. will demonstrate an understanding of the detailed chemistry of the atmosphere, including tropospheric chemistry, photochemical smog and stratospheric chemistry.

    11. will demonstrate an understanding of the greenhouse effect, including its mechanism, the role of molecular vibrations, the major greenhouse gases, and atmospheric residence time. the climate modifying effects of aerosols and global warming.

    12. will understand energy reserves and usage, the role of fossil fuels, and global warming

    13. will discuss quantitatively radioactivity, radon gas and nuclear energy

    14. will demonstrate a knowledge of pesticides, such as DDT, and the role of organochlorines in biological systems, organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, and herbicides

    15. will be able to discuss dioxins, furans, PCBs, and their health effect

    16. will be able to discuss PAHs, environmental estrogens, fire retardants, and perfluorinated sulfonates.

    17. will be able to discuss quantitatively the chemistry of natural waters, including redox chemistry, acid-base chemistry (the carbonate system) and ion concentrations in natural waters

    18. will be able to discuss the pollution and purification of water, including disinfection, wastewater and air purification techniques

    19. will be able to discuss the chemistry of the toxic metals Hg, Pb, Cd, As and Cr.20.

    20. will be able to describe water, soils and sediments, including domestic and commercial garbage, recycling, the superfund program and hazardous wastes.

     

    Statement Regarding Students With Disabilities

    “Accommodations are collaborative efforts between students, faculty and Disability Access Services (DAS). Students with accommodations approved through DAS are responsible for contacting the faculty member in charge of the course prior to or during the first week of the term to discuss accommodations. Students who believe they are eligible for accommodations but who have not yet obtained approval through DAS should contact DAS immediately at 737-4098."