remember the past · change the future

Archive: 2000-2005

OSU Holocaust Memorial Week 2005

Richard D. Breitman: Himmler - Architect of the Holocaust
May 5, 7:30 pm at Austin Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Richard BreitmanWhile the "Final Solution" - the destruction of European Jewry - was effected in the name of Hitler, its overall management was primarily in the hands of Heinrich Himmler, head of the S.S. More than just a manager, however, Himmler was an ideologue who set the tone for the S.S., an organization that he committed to eliminating all of those that he regarded as a danger to Germany and to the Aryan race that he glorified.

As author of The Architect of Genocide: Himmler and The Final Solution, Richard Breitman is particularly well qualified to discuss Himmler's motivation and his role in the Holocaust. Breitman, a Professor of History at American University, has published highly acclaimed works on several Holocaust-related topics, including German Socialism and Weimar Democracy; Breaking the Silence: American Refugee Policy and European Jewry, 1933-1945 (with Alan Kraut); and Official Secrets: What the Nazis Planned, What the British and Americans Knew. He works with the U.S. Holocaust Museum as editor-in-chief of Holocaust and Genocide Studies and is currently Director of Historical Research for the Nazi War Criminal Records Interagency Working Group, a federal government agency.

 



Panel: Refugees, East and West
May 4, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

During the mid- and late 1930's, as well as throughout the war, Jews fled Nazi-occupied Europe in all directions. Most did not survive, being instead swept up into the Holocaust. But many did find refuge. This event will focus on two stories about escape.

Participants:

Ursula Bacon was a wartime resident of the Shanghai ghetto, which at its peak was occupied by 20,000-25,000 European Jews. Although temporarily safe from the Nazis, these Jews were surrounded by another fierce conflict, for they were much oppressed by the Japanese occupiers. Ms. Bacon recently published Shanghai Diary, a memoir of her experiences in the ghetto. During her talk, she will discuss life in the Shanghai ghetto. Afterwards, she will be available to sign copies of her book.
Aristides de Sousa Mendes

 

Sebastian Mendes is on the faculty of the Department of Art at Western Washington University. His talk at OSU will deal with his grandfather, Aristides de Sousa Mendes. During the war, de Sousa Mendes was a Portuguese diplomat serving in Vichy France. Defying the orders of his government, he issued 30,000 visas that enabled Jewish refugees to escape to Spain and Portugal. The Portuguese government dismissed him from his post and deprived him of his pension. Like many other rescuers, he died in poverty. In 1993, Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Jerusalem, honored him as one of the "Righteous of the Nations." He is the only Portuguese to be so recognized.

 

 

 


 

Symposium: The Jewish Body and Anti-Semitic Stereotypes
May 3, 7:00 pm at Powell Conference Center, OSU Memorial Union

Our second evening program will focus on the relationship between myths and stereotypes regarding the Jewish body and how they both fitted into and few the broader phenomenon of Jew-hatred.

Participants:

John Efron

John Efron (Berkeley)

Relevant publications: Defenders of the Race: Jewish Doctors and Race Science in Fin-de-Siecle Europe (1994); Medicine and the German Jews (2001); co-editor, Jewish History and Jewish Memory (1998)

Topic: "Jewish Doctors in Pre-Nazi Germany"

John Hoberman

John Hoberman (University of Texas)

Relevant publications: Sport and Political Ideology (1984); The Olympic Crisis (1986); Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (1992)

Topic: "The Jewish Body in Pain"
Neil Davison Neil Davison (Oregon State University)

Relevant publication: James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity (1996)

Topic: "The Jewish Homme/Femme-Fatale: (Art)ifice, Race, and DuMaurier's TRILBY"
Paul Kopperman Paul Kopperman (Oregon State University)

Relevant publication: Ashes and Smoke: The Holocaust in Its History (2003)

Topic: "The Effeminization of the Jewish Male: A Convergence of Myth and Stereotype"

 



Lynne Viola: The Other Archipelago: Stalin's War Against the Peasantry
May 2, 7:30 pm at Withycombe Auditorium

Each year, one day of Holocaust Memorial Week at OSU is set aside to focus on an episode of genocide or mass murder other than the Holocaust. In 2005, this program will deal with the extirpation of the Russian peasant class known as the kulaks.

In his classic work, The Gulag Archipelago, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn wrote of the vast network of concentration camps that Stalin built to house "enemies of the people." These were institutions of slave labor and isolation where millions of people died. Yet there was another archipelago of the gulag, a peasant archipelago, that developed in tandem with the concentration camps. This archipelago existed beyond the gaze of foreign observers and long remained hidden from historians. Even Solzhenitsyn could only hint at its existence. But it was vast, stretching across the enormity of the Soviet Union's empty hinterlands. This archipelago of the gulag was an internal diaspora of peasant families, the so-called kulaks, who were "liquidated as a class" in the early 1930s during Stalin's forced collectivization of agriculture. Those who were not killed outright were forcibly uprooted from their homes and villages and deposited in the desolate open spaces of the far north, the Urals, Siberia, the far east, and Kazakhstan. In 1930 and 1931, the highpoint of the peasant deportations, the Soviet regime sent close to two million people into internal exile, accounting for the largest contingent of prisoners in the Soviet Union through the mid-1930s and the single largest deportation of the entire Soviet era.

Lynne Viola (Professor of History, University of Toronto) specializes in 20th-century Russian political and social history. Her research interests include women, peasants, political culture, and Stalinist terror. She is the author of some thirty articles and two books The Best Sons of the Fatherland: Workers in the Vanguard of Soviet Collectivization (1987) and Peasant Rebels Under Stalin: Collectivization and the Culture of Peasant Resistance (1996) - and has edited eight other works, including collections of documents that make a fundamental difference in how the early Stalinist period is understood. A member of the University of Toronto based Stalin Era Research and Archive Project, she is currently working on a book about the deportation of peasants in Stalinist Russia.

 



Sgt. Don Malarkey: Freedom is not Free
April 25, 7:30 pm at LaSells Stewart Center

Don Malarkey, World War II veteran and inspiration for Stephan Ambrose's Band of Brothers will deliver his lecture, "Freedom is not Free" on Monday, April 25 at 7:00 PM at the LaSells Steward Center on the Oregon State University Campus. The lecture is free and open to the public.

During World War II, Don Malarkey was a sergeant in Easy Company and participated in a number of major operations and engagements as Allied forces moved toward victory against the Nazi's, including D-Day, Operation Market Garden, and Bastogne. Toward the close of the war, he assisted in the liberation of Berchtesgaden and Zell am See. Now a resident of Salem, he was a major resource, and inspiration for a character by the same name, for Stephen Ambrose as he wrote Band of Brothers.

The opportunity for young people to learn from, and to be inspired by, people of Sergeant Malarkey's caliber is diminishing daily. Malarkey has considerable experience as a speaker, and his visit to campus will include an evening lecture, photo opportunities, and a raffled door prize of the HBO miniseries, The Band of Brother, to be donated by Fred Meyers in Corvallis.

This lecture will kick off the 2005 Holocaust Memorial Week, which will take place May 2nd through May 5th. Sergeant Malarkey helped to liberate several concentration camps while serving in the European theatre, and his memories are precious - representing one of the last remaining first hand testimonies of camp liberation. Students, faculty and community members will greatly benefit from Sergeant Malarkey's very important memories, which will raise awareness about the 60th anniversary of the end of the war, as well as the upcoming Holocaust Memorial Week.



Dr. Eric Ehrenreich: Racial Scientific Ideology and Motivations for the Holocaust
April 14, 4:00 pm at Powell Leadership Center, OSU Memorial Union

The Nazis claimed that their racial policies were based on cutting edge science. Even before the Nazi assumption of power, many of the most prominent German natural scientists endorsed the racist claims that the Nazis later institutionalized as state ideology. Indeed, few individuals or institutions in Germany questioned the validity of racial "science." The widespread acceptance of ideas that would later be shown to be demonstrably false ideas was based on perceptions of benefits associated with these ideas.

Dr. Ehrenreich maintains that the Final Solution was in seeming disjunction with this historical development, as the destruction of the Jews would appear to have been objectively detrimental to the interests of the Nazi leadership. Rather, as he will maintain during his talk at OSU, the primary benefit to the Nazis may have been psychological, rather than practical.

Eric Ehrenreich is currently a Douglas and Carol Cohen Family Scholar at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Center for Advanced Historical Studies. He is revising for publication his doctoral thesis, "Genealogy and Genocide: The Nazi 'Proof of Ancestry' and the Holocaust."

Sponsored by United State Holocaust Memorial Museum, Center for Advanced Historical Studies and OSU Holocaust Memorial Program.

 


 

OSU Holocaust Memorial Week 2004

Program on the massacres in Cambodia, 1975-1979
April 22, 7:00 pm at Gilfillan Auditorium (Wilkinson Hall)

During the regime of Pol Pot, more than one million Cambodians were slain by the Khmer Rouge. This event will provide audiences with some sense of the horror of that time. It will be introduced by a panel of OSU students from Cambodia who will share their stories or those of their families. Their reminiscences will be followed by the screening of The Killing Fields, the 1984 classic that was nominated for seven Academy Awards and won three. The Killing Fields focuses on the true story of an American reporter, played by Sam Waterston, and his Cambodian interpreter, played by Haing S. Ngor (Academy Award, Best Supporting Actor). More broadly, the film deals graphically with the murderous rampage that swept away perhaps one-fifth, perhaps more, of the entire population of Cambodia.

 



Falicja (Concert)
April 21, 7:30 pm at First Methodist Church of Corvallis

Jack Falk, who lives in Portland and hosts a weekly radio program on Yiddish music, will perform a group of musical selections and poems that recall the ghettoes and camps of the Holocaust period. Audience members will receive programs that will include all songs and poems in translation.

The musical program will include selections from the Terezin (Theresienstadt) concentration camp; works by the well-known folk poet Mordecai Gebirtig, who was martyred in the Krakow ghetto; compositions that were created and performed in the Lodz ghetto; and other pieces taken from Shmerke Kaczerginski's seminal work, Lider fun di getos un lagern ("Songs of the ghettos and concentration camps"), a compilation that Kaczerginski (himself a survivor of the Vilna ghetto) published soon after the war. The music will also draw from the rich Chassidic tradition, which emphasizes song as the consummate vehicle for casting off melancholy and for finding the strength to persevere through times of great peril.

This program will likewise feature the Yiddish poetry of Yankev Glatshteyn, Avrohom Sutzkever, and others who wrote in the years immediately following the Shoah. Finally, the program will include comments by Andrew Ehrlich, concertmaster of the Portland Chamber Orchestra. Both parents of Mr. Ehrlich, who will be accompanying Jack Falk on violin, were survivors of the Holocaust. During the course of the evening he will speak briefly about his parents and his own experiences growing up as a child of survivors. Throughout the event, songs and music will be accompanied by the videotaped comments of Mr. Ehrlich's mother, Falicja, whose name provided the title for this event.

 



William L. Brustein: Prelude to Holocaust: Jew - Hatred in Interwar Europe
April 20, 5:42 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Among Holocaust scholars in mid-career, William Brustein is one of the most accomplished. What sets him apart from Holocaust authorities in general is his interdisciplinary approach. Director of the University Center for International Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, he is also a professor of History, Political Science, and Sociology. During the past decade he has concentrated on the subject of Antisemitism among Nazi Party members on the grassroots level and has built out from this to review the same issue among the social rank-and-file in other European nations in the interwar period. His project has so far resulted in two books, both of them important, innovative, and influential: The Logic of Evil: The Social Origins of the Nazi Party, 1925-1933 and Roots of Hate: Anti-Semitism in Europe Before the Holocaust.

When he speaks at Oregon State, Professor Brustein will discuss the primary conclusions that he has drawn from his research on interwar popular Antisemitism. Beyond that, he will deal not only with the subject of Antisemitism in interwar Europe, but with a rise in this prejudice over the past decade, and he will analyze the reasons for the trend in both periods. His talk should be of interest not only in examining Antisemitism per se, but the broader issue of why individuals and groups are drawn to prejudice.



Walter Plywaski: A Survivor’s Story
April 19, 7:30 pm at Austin Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

In 1954, Walter Plywaski enrolled at Oregon State College (later, OSU). He had varied interests, and for a time he studied English literature under Bernard Malamud, before finally majoring in electrical engineering and graduating in that field in 1957. But his background was very different from that of his classmates. Born Wladyslaw Plywacki in Lodz, Poland, in 1929, he and his family were forced into the ghetto there when it was established ten years later. In 1944, the family was transported via freight car to Auschwitz-Birkenau, and Walter last saw his mother when she was forced into a line that led to the gas chamber. He later witnessed the fatal beating of his father at the hands of a camp commandant. Against great odds, he and a stepbrother - who would later precede him to Oregon State - were able to remain together in a series of camps, finally making their escape from Dachau.

Walter Plywaski's appearance promises to be a very special evening, as well as a homecoming.

 


OSU Holocaust Memorial Week 2003

A World Without Bodies (Film and talk)
May 1, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Paul Kopperman, professor of history at OSU, will discuss the eugenics/euthanasia program in Nazi Germany, which cost the lives of about 240,000 mentally or physically disabled people. This event will include the presentation of a documentary, A World Without Bodies, which deals with the campaign against the disabled.

 



Chella Kryszak: A Survivor’s Story
April 30, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

During the Second World War, Mrs. Kryszak, a Dutch Jew, endured eight concentration/death camps, including Auschwitz, and a death march. She is well known as a witness and speaker. Her talk will be preceded by a vigil, beginning at 6:30 p.m., in the courtyard of the LaSells Stewart Center.

This event is sponsored by OSU Hillel.

 



Symposium: Homosexuality, Nazis, and the Holocaust
April 29, 7:00 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Participants:

Harry Oosterhuis (University of Maastricht), Male Bonding and Homosexuality in Nazi Germany. Professor Oosterhuis is the author of Homosexuality and Male Bonding in Pre-Nazi Germany; Gay Men and the Sexual History of the Political Left; and Stepchildren of Nature: Krafft-Ebing, Psychiatry, and the Making of Sexual Identity.

Mark Meyers (University of King's College, Halifax), The Nazi as Homosexual/The Homosexual as Nazi: Historicizing a Persistent Cultural Fantasy. Dr. Meyers' interests include postmodernism and the shaping of identity in European societies.

Jim Steakley (University of Wisconsin), Comparative Victimhood: The Holocaust and/versus the Homocaust. Among Professor Steakley's publications is his highly acclaimed monograph, The Homosexual Emancipation Movement in Germany.

Geoffrey Giles (University of Florida) will serve as moderator. Professor Giles, author of Students and National Socialism in Germany, has worked extensively on the theme of popular culture and identity in Europe.

This event is sponsored by the Thomas Hart and Mary Jones Horning Endowment in the Humanities.

 



Nechama Tec: Gender Differences in Holocaust Experience
April 28, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Nechama Tec, a professor at the University of Connecticut at Stamford, has published six books on the Holocaust, including the classic When Light Pierced the Darkness: Christian Rescue of Jews in Nazi-Occupied Poland. A survivor herself, she has recounted her own wartime experiences in Dry Tears: The Story of a Lost Childhood. Her talk at OSU draws on her latest book, Resilience and Courage: Women, Men, and the Holocaust.

Professor Tec's appearance is co-sponsored by OSU Convocations and Lectures.

 


OSU Holocaust Memorial Week 2002

 

Richard G. Hovannisian: The Armenian Genocide as a Prototype
April 16, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Holocaust Memorial observances will conclude with a program on the Armenian Massacres of 1915-16. There will be films and exhibits on the massacres during the day of April 16. Richard G. Hovannisian, the speaker that evening, is Professor of Armenian and Near Eastern History at UCLA. Well known for his multi-volume study, The Republic of Armenia, Professor Hovannisian is likewise among the preeminent historians of the massacres, and he has edited and contributed to three major works in the field: The Armenian Genocide in Perspective; The Armenian Genocide: History, Politics, Ethics; and Remembrance and Denial: The Case of the Armenian Genocide. He also has a great interest in the issue of comparative genocide and during his talk at OSU he will discuss parallels between the Armenian Massacres, the Holocaust, and other episodes of mass murder in the twentieth century.

 



Panel: Reflections on Terezin
April 15, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

The notorious "model settlement" that the Nazis operated at Terezin (Theresienstadt) 1941-45 in an attempt to show that they were treating Jews humanely was in fact a way station, and most of the inmates who did not die there were sent on to the extermination camps. Only about 15% survived the war. Nevertheless, here as in other ghettos the Jews maintained an active cultural and educational program. During the four years that the ghetto functioned, more than 2300 public lectures were given - by professors, rabbis, physicians, and others who sought to contribute to the intellectual vitality of the inmates. Meanwhile, the cultural life of the ghetto was highlighted by an active musical program. Of particular meaning to the inmates was Verdi's Requiem, which was performed sixteen times and was interpreted as a show of defiance. At the last performance, Adolf Eichmann was in attendance, unaware of the symbolism in the concert.

This program will begin with a virtual tour of Terezin provided by Petra Penickova, a guide at the camp memorial. Paul Kopperman (Professor of History, OSU) will speak on The Terezin Lectures and the Theme of Jewish Resistance. Concluding the program, a panel will discuss Jewish efforts to maintain their culture in the ghetto at Terezin. Among the participants in that panel will be Edgar Krasa, a survivor of the ghetto and a member of the chorus at all sixteen performances of the Requiem.

This program is sponsored by the Oregon Symphony

 



Panel: A New Beginning?
April 11, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Representatives of several Christian denominations will discuss what their respective churches have done in recent years to combat Antisemitism. Participants will include: Rev. Timothy Stover, United Campus Ministry; Professor Chris Anderson, a deacon at St. Mary’s; and Tom Sherry, of the LDS Institute of Religion, will also moderate.

 



Sibylle Niemoller von Sell: Confronting Evil
April 10, 7:30 pm at Austin Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Sibylle Niemoller – actress, writer, and renowned speaker -- will discuss the career of her late husband, Martin Niemoller, a primary figure in the Confessing Church during the 1930's. Pastor Niemoller was interned 1937-1945, mainly at Sachsenhausen and Dachau, and indeed today he is primarily remembered outside Germany for a statement that he made after the war: “They came for the Communists, and I didn't object – For I wasn't a Communist; They came for the Socialists, and I didn’t object – For I wasn’t a Socialist; They came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t object – For I wasn’t a trade unionist; They came for the Jews, and I didn’t object – For I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for me – And there was no one left to object.” Nevertheless, Martin Niemoller and other ministers in the Confessing Church did in fact stand up to the Nazis on many issues during the 1930's, protesting particularly their efforts to reconstruct Christianity along lines that reflected their ideology. Besides reflecting on her husband’s career, Mrs. Niemoller will speak of her own wartime experiences, notably her participation in an underground group that attempted to rescue Jews in Germany.



Doris L. Bergen: Twisted Cross: Were the Nazis Christians?
April 9, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Doris L. Bergen, a member of the history faculty at Notre Dame, is the author of a highly acclaimed book, Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich. She has done extensive work on Holocaust-related issues and is a member of the board at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. In her talk at OSU, Dr. Bergen will consider three perspectives -- statistical, ideological, and institutional -- as she examines the issue of whether the Nazis were Christians. Her talk is intended to encourage the audience to reconsider the roots and the lessons of the Holocaust.

Doris L. Bergen’s appearance is sponsored by OSU Convocations and Lectures.



Itka Zygmuntowicz: A Survivor’s Story
April 9, 12:00 pm at Snell Forum (MU East)

Mrs. Zygmuntowicz, a survivor of Auschwitz, will discuss her wartime experiences. A number of photos of concentration camps will be on exhibit in the Snell Forum, and Rachel Becker, an OSU student, will read a letter written in April 1945 by an American soldier who, having participated in the liberation of Buchenwald, reported his impressions.



Angel: A Nightmare in Two Acts (Play by Jo Davidsmeyer)
April 8, 8:00 pm at Snell Forum (MU East)

Angel, which is based on an actual case, depicts the postwar trial of a former SS Camp Guard, Irma Grese, whose angelic beauty contrasts with her violent nature. While in prison awaiting her execution, Grese, who is cynical as well as sadistic, attacks the complacent sense of justice of the British officer who had prosecuted her. Josef Mengele, whom Grese had assisted both in carrying out his experiments and in making selections, appears in nightmare visions to support her in her attack. This thought-provoking play on the nature of evil will be performed as reader’s theater.



Holocaust vigil for the OSU campus community
April 8, 7:00 pm at Front steps, OSU Memorial Union

Speakers will include Helen Berg, the mayor of Corvallis, and Danette Gillespie, Head of the OSU Diversity Committee.



Lawrence Baron: Christianities of Complicity and of Compassion
April 7, 7:30 pm at Withycombe Auditorium

During the Holocaust, many European Christians, stirred by a tradition of Jew-hatred, cooperated in the extermination of the Jews. Others, however, were moved by a religious sense to protect their Jewish neighbors. Lawrence Baron (Professor of Jewish History, San Diego State) has authored or co-authored four books and many articles, including Embracing the Other: Philosophical, Psychological, and Historical Perspectives on Altruism. His talk at OSU will focus on the issue of how the religious sense of strongly identifying European Christians was reflected in the stances that they took in relation to the Holocaust.

 


OSU Holocaust Memorial Week 2001

 

John R. Braun: Ethnic Cleansing in the Former Yugoslavia: The Historical Background
April 24, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Why did “ethnic cleansing” return to Yugoslavia in the 1990's? John R. Braun, who teaches history at OSU, will discuss this issue in terms of the history of the region: the Ottoman background, the Balkan and World Wars, the failure to create a stable multi-ethnic state, and the rise of nationalism during the 1980's.



Pretty Village, Pretty Flame (Film)
April 24, 3:30 pm at Killer Hall, Room 350

Pretty Village, Pretty Flame (in Serbian, with English subtitles) is a highly acclaimed film that was produced in 1997. It is the story of a Bosnian Muslim and a Serb who had been boyhood friends but find themselves in combat during the civil war of the 1990's.



Al Wiener: A Survivor’s Story
April 19, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

At the core of our annual program is the testimony of an individual who personally witnessed the horror that was the Holocaust. The speaker this year, Al Wiener, was born in Poland. As a young boy, he had to identify the body of his father, shot by the Germans. He later endured five camps. Yet, he also saw some good, such as the German woman who helped to keep him alive by smuggling food to him. What he saw and experienced during the Holocaust will be the subject of his talk at OSU.



Mark Largent: Eugenic Sterilization in Oregon, 1909-1983
April 18, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

During the early decades of the 20th century, the eugenics movement swept Europe and the U.S. eugenicists aimed at improving national or racial stock by eliminating “undesirable” elements. A radical form of this perspective encouraged the Nazi effort to eliminate European Jewry. The American version of eugenics was not so extreme, but it was politically potent at a time when many scientists and intellectuals believed that human social qualities were biologically based. In 1917, the Oregon Assembly enacted a law enabling forced sterilization of “persons with inferior hereditary potentialities.” In his lecture, Mark Largent, an assistant professor in the OSU Dept. of History, will discuss the eugenics movement in Oregon in terms of the sterilization campaign, and relate it to the movement on a national and international scale. Dr. Largent is well known for his scholarship on the history of American eugenics, and in recent months has begun to research previously untapped resources on eugenics in Oregon.



Thomas Brand: International Law, Crimes against Humanity, and the Lessons of Nuremberg
April 17, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Colonel (ret.) Thomas Brand, who served for many years in the Judge Advocate General Corps, is the son of James T. Brand, a justice of the Oregon Supreme Court and the judge who oversaw the trials at Nuremberg that focused on crimes against humanity. Judge Brand was the model for Spencer Tracy's character in the film classic, Judgment at Nuremberg. In his talk at OSU, Thomas Brand will review the history and progress of International Criminal Law. Drawing on both his own expertise in International Law and his father's observations, he will comment on the concept of "Crimes against Humanity" as it was applied at Nuremberg.

 

 



Michael Allen: Modernity, the Holocaust, and Machines without History
April 16, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Dr. Allen is an assistant professor of history at Georgia Tech. Among the most accomplished young scholars in the field of Holocaust Studies, his many honors include a fellowship at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. In his talk, which anticipates findings and observations that will be included in a forthcoming book, he will address the issue of how the Nazis’ concept of “modernity” helped to precipitate the Holocaust.

 

 



Candlelight Vigil
April 15, 7:30 pm at Memorial Union Quad

Speakers will include: Helen Berg, mayor of Corvallis, and Cantor Lyle Rockler.

 


OSU Holocaust Memorial Week 2000

 

Kindertransport (Play by Diane Samuels)
May 6, 7:30 pm at OSU Lab Theater, Withycombe Hall

This play focuses on Evelyn, born Eva, a woman who, in 1938, had joined thousands of other Jewish children who were sent from Germany and Austria to Britain by their parents, to get them out of harm's way. As an adult, Evelyn attempts to dissociate herself from her heritage and the trauma of her early years, only to be forced to recall when her daughter discovers papers and memorabilia revealing Eva's childhood in Germany and England. Kindertransport has been widely performed and well received in both Britain and the United States. (There will be three other performances of Kindertransport, as listed below. Each performance will be followed by a discussion of the play and its themes.)

Note: In keeping with traditional policy, no admission is charged to those who attend Memorial Week events. However, because of the costs involved in producing this play and the McCabe concert (see entry for May 2), those who attend either event are encouraged to provide donations to the Holocaust program -- $5 is suggested for the play, $8 for the concert; more is gratefully accepted. No one should feel obligated to make a donation.



Kindertransport (Play by Diane Samuels)
May 5, 7:30 pm at OSU Lab Theater, Withycombe Hall

This play focuses on Evelyn, born Eva, a woman who, in 1938, had joined thousands of other Jewish children who were sent from Germany and Austria to Britain by their parents, to get them out of harm's way. As an adult, Evelyn attempts to dissociate herself from her heritage and the trauma of her early years, only to be forced to recall when her daughter discovers papers and memorabilia revealing Eva's childhood in Germany and England. Kindertransport has been widely performed and well received in both Britain and the United States. (There will be three other performances of Kindertransport, as listed below. Each performance will be followed by a discussion of the play and its themes.)

Note: In keeping with traditional policy, no admission is charged to those who attend Memorial Week events. However, because of the costs involved in producing this play and the McCabe concert (see entry for May 2), those who attend either event are encouraged to provide donations to the Holocaust program -- $5 is suggested for the play, $8 for the concert; more is gratefully accepted. No one should feel obligated to make a donation.



My Knees Were Jumping and Visas and Virtue (Films)
May 5, 3:00 pm at Kidder Hall, Room 364

The first is an acclaimed documentary on the kindertransport. The second, which won an Academy Award as best short film in 1997, deals with Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese consul general in Lithuania on the eve of World War II. During the summer of 1940 Sugihara, acting alone and working at an exhausting pace, prepared thousands of travel visas that opened an avenue of escape for Lithuanian and Polish Jews who would otherwise have perished in the Holocaust.



The Quarrel (Film)
May 4, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

This thought-provoking film focuses on two men who have a chance meeting. They had been boyhood friends during the 1930's and had studied together at yeshiva, but they had been separated by war. Both had endured time in concentration camps. Now, as they meet and converse, each learns how that experience had transformed the other. One is a fervent believer; the other, an atheist. After the film, Courtney Campbell, of the OSU Department of Philosophy, will comment on it and lead a discussion.



Abraham Cooper: The Moral Power of Memory
May 3, 7:30 pm at Milam Auditorium

Abraham Cooper is associate dean of the Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles. In the course of researching Unit 731, he conducting interviews with a former member, and recently he spoke to a delegation from the Japanese Diet about the need for their government to acknowledge the atrocities that occurred in China during the occupation. His talk at OSU will draw in part on the issues he dealt with in his remarks to the Diet.



In the Name of the Emperor and What Did Hirohito Know? (Films)
May 3, 3:00 pm at Kidder Hall, Room 364

The first film deals with the massacre of Chinese residents of Nanking by the Japanese in 1937, while the second is about Unit 731, which engaged in human experiments and research on germ warfare, killing thousands of Chinese in the process.



Music in Remembrance (Concert)
May 2, 7:30 pm at First Presbyterian Church (114 SW 8th St., Corvallis)

Soloists include Rachelle McCabe (OSU music faculty), piano; Dana Mazurkevich, violin; Hamilton Cheifetz, cello; and Richard Poppino, baritone. The program will include renditions of Yiddish songs sung in the ghettos, including the well-known Undzer Shtetl Brent ("Our Town is Burning") by Mordecai Gebirtig, the noted composer who, with his wife and two daughters, died in 1942 at the hands of the Nazis. These songs will be performed by Richard Poppino, accompanied by Rachelle McCabe. Dana Mazurkevich and Rachelle McCabe will perform Baal Shem ("Three Pictures of Chassidic Life"), by Ernest Bloch. Hamilton Cheifetz, cellist, will perform the poignant Kol Nidre, by Max Bruch. Mazurkevich, Cheifetz and McCabe will perform movements from the profound composition Quartet for the End of Time, by Oliver Messiaen. Messiaen, a Catholic, composed this quartet while imprisoned in a concentration camp. Dana Mazurkevich will also perform the theme music from Schindler's List. In addition to performing as a musician, she will speak to the audience as a Holocaust survivor. Born in 1941 in the Jewish ghetto of Kovno, she, along with her mother, survived thirteen selections -- any of which could easily have resulted in death -- before she was smuggled out of the ghetto to live out the war under the protection of a Lithuanian family. During the course of the evening, she will tell her story.



Will Keim: Buber and the Ghettos
May 2, 12:30 pm at OSU Memorial Union, Room 208

Martin Buber, one of the towering figures of modern intellectual history, came perilously close to being caught up in the Holocaust. The story of his escape will the subject of this talk. Will Keim is noted as an inspirational speaker and the author of The Education of Character. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on Buber.



Helen Epstein: Why Remember the Holocaust?
May 1, 7:30 pm at Construction and Engineering Auditorium, LaSells Stewart Center

Helen Epstein is well known for her writings on the relationship between Holocaust survivors and their children - she herself is the daughter of survivors - especially two books: Children of the Holocaust and Where She Came From: A Daughter's Search for Her Mother's History. She is affiliated with the Center for European Studies at Harvard and the Hadassah International Research Institute on Jewish Women (Brandeis). In her talk at OSU, she will discuss how her quest for information on her mother's early years, in pre-war Czechoslovakia, dovetails with the broader issue of why the Holocaust must be remembered.

The support of OSU Convocations and Lectures has helped to make this event possible.



Recitation of Kaddish (sponsored by Hillel)
May 1-5, 12:00 pm at Memorial Union Music Lounge

Kaddish also at noon on May 2, 3, 4, and 5.



Community Vigil (sponsored by Hillel)
April 30, 8:00 pm at OSU Quad (if weather is bad, Memorial Union Ballroom)



Kindertransport (Play by Diane Samuels)
April 29 & 30, 3:00 pm at OSU Lab Theater, Withycombe Hall

This play focuses on Evelyn, born Eva, a woman who, in 1938, had joined thousands of other Jewish children who were sent from Germany and Austria to Britain by their parents, to get them out of harm's way. As an adult, Evelyn attempts to dissociate herself from her heritage and the trauma of her early years, only to be forced to recall when her daughter discovers papers and memorabilia revealing Eva's childhood in Germany and England. Kindertransport has been widely performed and well received in both Britain and the United States. (There will be three other performances of Kindertransport, as listed below. Each performance will be followed by a discussion of the play and its themes.)

Note: In keeping with traditional policy, no admission is charged to those who attend Memorial Week events. However, because of the costs involved in producing this play and the McCabe concert (see entry for May 2), those who attend either event are encouraged to provide donations to the Holocaust program -- $5 is suggested for the play, $8 for the concert; more is gratefully accepted. No one should feel obligated to make a donation.