300 Laboratory Safety

301: Hazardous Waste Disposal

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety
Effective: 12/06/2005
Revised: 2/22/2012

Purpose

To ensure proper management and disposal of hazardous waste.

Applicability

Academic, research, and facility operations that use hazardous materials and subsequently generate hazardous waste.

Background

A comprehensive hazardous materials program is in place at OSU that provides guidelines for the use of materials that generate hazardous waste.  This program is designed to minimize the possibility of a threat to human health or the environment caused by fire, explosion, or any unplanned release of hazardous materials into the air, soil, or surface water.

Waste Categories
Hazardous waste can be broadly grouped into four categories: chemical, radioactive, biohazardous, and material that is sharp.  Each category has hazards that have an effect on safe handling and disposal practices, and a specific waste may have properties associated with two or more categories.  See SAF-Ex3: Waste Categories for an explanation of the different types of waste categories.

Policy

University faculty, staff, and students who generate hazardous waste must cooperate with OSU Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) to ensure the safe and proper identification, collection, accumulation, packaging, and disposal of hazardous wastes.  EH&S does not accept unknown or radiological wastes.

Procedure

Hazardous waste disposal procedures are maintained on the EH&S website at http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ehs/hwpages/index.html

Online Hazardous Waste Pickup Request: http://oregonstate.edu/ehs/waste

Hazardous waste labels: http://oregonstate.edu/ehs/waste

Additional Information

Environmental Health & Safety provides technical assistance as well as emergency incident response services in the event of a chemical fire, explosion, and/or release.  For hazardous waste management consultation services, call EH&S at 541-737- 2273 or Radiation Safety (RS) at 541-737- 2227.

302: Chemical Spill Management

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety

Purpose

To protect employees and the university community by providing guidance and instruction on how to effectively manage a chemical spill.

Applicability

Faculty, staff, and students who discover or are involved in a chemical emergency.

Definition

Hazardous Chemicals

A chemical or material is considered hazardous if:

  • It is flammable, highly reactive, or explosive
  • It generates harmful vapors or dust particles that affect eyes or lungs.
  • It is corrosive and attacks skin, clothing, equipment, furniture or facilities.
  • It is poisonous by ingestion or absorption.
  • It is radioactive.  (For spills of radioactive material, immediately call Radiation Safety, 7-2227, and follow their instructions.)

Policy

Faculty, staff, or students who discover or are involved in a hazardous chemical spill are responsible for notifying the appropriate authorities and following established protocol. This protocol is outlined in OSU Safety Instruction #19 and found on the EH&S Web site.

Spilled chemicals should be effectively and quickly contained and cleaned up.  Such spills should be handled correctly to avoid extensive property damage and personal injury.

EH&S Responsibility

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) is responsible for maintaining a Hazardous Material Spill Response Program that is in compliance with applicable policies, rules and regulations.  The EH&S Hazardous Material Spill Response Program provides access to Material Safety Data Sheets that provide guidance and/or assistance with spill cleanup, the maintenance of hazardous chemical spill response equipment and materials, and procedures for notifying authorities (e.g. DEQ) in case of major spills

Supervisor Responsibility

Supervisors working with hazardous materials are responsible for being familiar with the hazardous properties of the materials, establishing appropriate spill procedures, being familiar with the EH&S Hazardous Chemical program, and for ensuring that all employees are aware of spill policies and procedures.

Employee Responsibility

All employees working in areas where hazardous materials are used or stored are responsible for knowing proper procedures to deal with spills and the requirement that large spills (more than one gallon liquid or one pound solid) must be immediately reported to EH&S.

Procedure

General Guidelines

  1. The first step in dealing with any chemical spill is assessment of the magnitude of spilled material and the associated level of hazard.  No one should attempt to deal with a spill until properly equipped with adequate personal protective equipment and spill treatment materials.
  2. Risk assessment is successful only if personnel are familiar with the hazardous properties of the material they are handling and have developed methods to follow in the event of a spill.   Information of this type is available from safety data sheets and from Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S).  The basic philosophy of chemical spill control at OSU is to contain and absorb first, treat second.
  3. EH&S has the responsibility to respond to chemical spills and oversee cleanup activities.  EH&S also has the authority to ensure that appropriate cleanup steps are taken in accordance with applicable environmental regulations.  EH&S maintains a chemical spill response vehicle that is equipped to handle typical chemical spills.  Contact EH&S for assistance when dealing with a chemical spill by calling 7-2273, or by contacting Public Safety, 7-3010. 
  4. The capability of EH&S to deal with chemical spills does not lessen the responsibility of laboratories to develop their own plans on how to safely deal with small spills.  Several chemical spill kits are commercially available for small spills and their use is encouraged.  For assistance in kit selection, contact EH&S.
  5. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has established regulations that require the submission of reports for spills that are above certain amounts.  All large spills of a hazardous chemical (more than one gallon liquid or one pound solid) must be reported promptly to EH&S, who will then make the report to DEQ if necessary.

Contacts

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) - (541) 737-2273
Radiation Safety (RS) - (541) 737-2227

303: Local Exhaust Systems

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety

Purpose

To ensure a safe and healthy work environment by establishing guidelines for exhaust systems.

Policy

Oregon State University requires the use of adequate local exhaust systems when required by federal, state, and local regulations pertaining to human exposures to hazardous materials in the air. 

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) and Radiation Safety (RS)

Responsibility

Environmental Health and Safety is responsible for establishing and facilitating a program covering local exhaust inspection, approval, and posting, in compliance with applicable policies, rules and regulations.  Radiation Safety is responsible for assessment and monitoring compliance for exhaust systems where radioactive materials are used or stored. 

Supervisor and Employee Responsibility

All persons conducting work or storing hazardous materials in a local exhaust system shall ensure compliance with all postings and will use the system only as designed and for which it is approved.

Requirements

  1. Each local exhaust system used to control the exposure of humans to hazardous chemicals or other detrimental materials in the air must be approved by Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S).  If radioactive materials are to be involved, approval by Radiation Safety (RS) is also required.  Local exhaust systems include chemical fume hoods, biological safety cabinets, close capture vents, glove boxes, and similar devices, but not building ventilation systems or other multi-area systems.
  2. Any concerns regarding the need for a local exhaust system for control of human exposure to radioactive materials shall be sent to and resolved by RS, and EH&S for exposures to other materials.
  3. For new systems, approval requires the following:
  1. The system must be of a design suitable for its intended use (i.e., suitable dimensions, no use of chemical fume hood where glove box is needed, suitable location, etc.).
  2. The system shall be easily decontaminated (i.e., smooth surfaces, non-absorbent and non-reactive with respect to intended materials to be contained, surfaces reasonably accessible, etc.).
  3. The system shall provide a reasonably uniform airflow rate, of suitable velocity, to capture or control the hazardous materials present under all expected working conditions.
  • Chemical fume hoods to be used with regulated carcinogens must have minimum average face velocity of 150 linear feet per minute (lfm), with no point less than 120 lfm, for any working opening.
  • Chemical fume hoods to be used for radioactive materials and other hazardous material, but no regulated carcinogens, must have minimum average face velocity of 100 lfm, with no point less than 80 lfm, for any working opening.
  • Minimum sash height for chemical fume hoods will be fifteen inches except where otherwise approved by EH&S.
  • For biological safety cabinets, close capture hoods, etc., EH&S shall approve minimum face velocity and opening size on a case-by-case basis.  Where applicable, EH&S will specify maximum face velocity and/or minimum sash opening.
  1. For existing systems that do not meet the requirements for a new system, EH&S may approve variances provided that adequate safety is insured.  Any such variance must be documented, with a copy sent to the using department.
  2. Any content or use restrictions will be posted conspicuously on each local exhaust system. For vertical sash fume hoods, minimum sash height will be posted.  Filter change needs, power switching needs, requirements for physical entry into or work on the system, etc., shall be posted if requested by EH&S or RS.
  3. Systems having substandard airflow rates may be used only for storage, and not for active work with hazardous chemicals.  Such systems will be conspicuously posted "For Storage Only" and approved by EH&S.  Any restrictions on permissible materials for storage will be prescribed by EH&S and conspicuously posted.
  4. For each local exhaust system, a routine inspection program will be conducted by EH&S or persons approved by EH&S.  A report of each inspection shall be given to the operating department, with a copy retained by EH&S.  The report shall include recommendations for any needed corrective actions.
  5. The operating department will insure that each required local exhaust system is properly maintained and not misused.

Contacts

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) - (541) 737-2273
Radiation Safety (RS) - (541) 737-2227

304: Chemical Carcinogen Safety Program

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety
Effectice: 06/15/2010
Revised: 3/27/2014

Purpose

To protect employees and the University community by providing procedures and instruction on how to effectively contain chemical carcinogens.

Policy

Oregon State University will maintain, within reasonable control of the University, an environment that will not adversely affect:

  • The health, safety, and well-being of students, staff, visitors, and neighboring human populations; and
  • The wild and domestic animals maintained on the campus of the University or in the contiguous area.

All research and teaching activities in facilities controlled by Oregon State University and involving the use of chemical carcinogens, as defined in the Chemical Carcinogen Safety Manual, shall be conducted in compliance with National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines, with the provisions of the Chemical Carcinogen Manual, and as approved by the Chemical Safety Committee.

Supervisor Responsibility

Supervisors are responsible for:

  1. being familiar with, adhering to, and ensuring compliance with all applicable laws, rules, and policies regarding chemical carcinogens as used in their program;
  2. using the Chemical Carcinogen Safety Program as a guide in developing a carcinogen safety program;
  3. obtaining, requiring and providing appropriate training;
  4. having the Chemical Carcinogen Safety Manual available;
  5. being aware of the characteristics of the chemicals with which they work;
  6. registering the use of Class B carcinogens; and
  7. obtaining authorization from the Chemical Safety Committee for Class C carcinogens.

Employee Responsibility

Employees are responsible for:

  1. familiarity and compliance with all applicable laws, rules, and policies regarding the chemical carcinogens they use;
  2. being aware of hazards associated with the chemicals; obtaining the appropriate training; and
  3. knowing about the additional resources (EH&S, Chemical Safety Committee, etc.).

Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Responsibility

EH&S (in concert with the University Chemical Safety Committee) is responsible for:

  1. the development and maintenance of a chemical carcinogen safety program;
  2. providing appropriate training;
  3. maintaining access to an up-to-date Guide for Chemical Carcinogen Classification;
  4. updating the Chemical Carcinogen Safety Manual as needed;
  5. providing liaisons with the Chemical Safety Committee;
  6. keeping current with NIH guidelines; and
  7. providing consultation to faculty, staff, and students.

Control of the Use of Chemical Carcinogens

The purpose of the Chemical Carcinogen Safety Program is to:

  • establish procedures and criteria for physical facilities to protect against occupationally acquired cancers and for protection of the general environment; and
  • contain all known or suspected chemical carcinogens within prescribed limits in accordance with nationally recognized safe standards of operation.

The program attempts to do this by:

  • identifying all users of chemical carcinogens on campus;
  • defining acceptable levels of exposure, as those permitted by federal and state regulations or recommended by authoritative sources such as the National Cancer Institute;
  • limiting projects and activities involving the use of chemical carcinogens to those authorized by the provisions of this manual.
  • developing and approving specific procedures for the use of chemical carcinogens to limit the exposure of, and the degree of hazard to, personnel and the environment; and
  • identifying and categorizing chemicals whose carcinogenic potential has recently been determined.

Chemical Carcinogen Manual

All campus personnel working with chemical carcinogens are required to have an understanding of the contents of the Chemical Carcinogen Manual.  This manual is intended to provide a system for assuring safety in the use of known or suspected chemical carcinogens.  The Chemical Carcinogen Safety Manual is available on-line, maintained by EH&S and should be accessible in campus facilities where chemical carcinogens are stored or used. 

Categorization of Chemical Carcinogens

The hazard categorization scheme is intended to reflect the net potential hazard associated with the conditions for use of each carcinogen.  Specifically, it considers not only the apparent biological potency of a compound, but the total quantity or concentration in use.  Thus, dilution of a Class C carcinogen may reduce its hazard to the Class B category.  Scientific evidence pertaining to the carcinogenic properties of chemicals change frequently.  See the Guide for Chemical Carcinogen Classification. EH&S will update the list when necessary.

Categories:

  1. Class C (Highly Hazardous) Chemical Carcinogens.
  1. Chemicals regulated by law.
  2. Chemicals not regulated by law but considered highly hazardous by the Chemical Safety Committee.
  1. Class B (Hazardous) Chemical Carcinogens.
  1. Class C chemical carcinogens diluted to defined concentration ranges.
  2. Chemicals identified in OSHA and other guidelines that do not exceed the hazardous category in any concentration.
  3. Other chemicals when used in research and teaching activities that could, on the basis of new information, require the restrictions listed for this category.
  1. Class A (Low Hazard) Chemical Carcinogens

    Those chemicals that, when used in research and teaching activities, could, in the opinion of the Chemical Safety Committee, require the restrictions listed for this category.

305: Biological Safety

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety
Revised: 02/22/2012

Purpose

To protect personnel and comply with applicable regulations.

Policy

The University shall pursue biological safety through every reasonable effort to protect personnel from exposure to infectious agents, prevent environmental contamination, and comply with applicable federal, state, and local regulations.

Biological Safety Program

The Biological Safety program applies to all locations and activities under University control in which rDNA and/or infectious agents (including bloodborne pathogens) are used or stored.

The Biological Safety Committee (BSC) must approve all activities involving the use of agents classified Biosafety Level 2 or 3. No research involving Biosafety Levels 4 will be permitted on campus.

All recombinant DNA (rDNA) activities shall meet the requirements of the most recent edition of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Guidelines for Recombinant DNA and Gene Transfer:

  1. Projects involving rDNA that are “Exempt” by NIH guidelines need not apply for approval by the BSC, but must be registered with EH&S.
  2. Projects that are not exempt must be approved by the BSC.

Biological Safety Committee (BSC)

The BSC, appointed by Vice Provost for Research, is responsible for recommending University policy with respect to biological safety in research activities, establishing standards and regulations needed to implement this policy, reviewing operations and procedures of biological safety, and acting as the review committee required by NIH.

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S)

EH&S is responsible for the development and coordination of the Biological Safety Program. This includes reviewing the requests for using infectious materials and/or rDNA and presenting them to the BSC if needed.

EH&S is also responsible for coordinating biological waste disposal, workplace surveillance programs, maintaining the Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan, and for providing consultation and advice on matters associated with biological safety.

Biological Safety Manual

The Biological Safety Manual contains University policies, regulations, and procedures pertaining to biological safety and the Biological Safety Program. The current manual is produced by EH&S and issued by the BSC.

306: Radiation Safety

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety
Revised: 10/01/2001

Purpose

To protect personnel and comply with applicable regulations.

Policy

Recognizing that ionizing radiation is useful in the teaching and research missions of OSU, university policy directs that radioisotopes and radiation-emitting machines be used as effectively as possible by OSU personnel at university facilities.  This is to be accomplished while ensuring that applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations are not violated; that risk from ionizing radiation is not incurred except when justified by the benefits from the activity; and that radiation exposure is maintained at a level that is as low as reasonably achievable.

Radiation Safety Program

The Vice President for Finance and Administration has been given the responsibility for maintaining a radiation safety program that adequately ensures compliance with university policy. The radiation safety program applies to all locations under university control in which radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines are used or stored. It applies to all persons who work in or visit these locations, and to all radioisotope and radiation-producing machines at these locations, regardless of ownership. The program applies to a limited extent to university personnel and equipment at locations not controlled by OSU.

Radiation Safety Committee

The Radiation Safety Committee, appointed by the Vice President for Finance and Administration, is responsible for recommending university policy with respect to radiation safety, establishing standards and regulations needed to implement this policy, reviewing operations and procedures of Radiation Safety, and acting as the statutory radiation use review committee required by State and Federal radioactive materials license.

Radiation Safety

Radiation Safety is the administrative unit responsible for processing requests for authorization to use radioisotopes or radiation machines, for providing personnel dosimeters, radioactive waste disposal, package inspection, work place surveillance programs, and for providing consultation and advice on matters associated with radiation safety.

Supervisor Responsibility

Generally, Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that all radioactive materials and/or radiation-producing machines are used in compliance with all applicable rules and regulations, ensuring adequate employee training, keeping up to date on radiation safety practices and requirements, and maintaining a good radiation safety program in their lab.  Detailed responsibilities may be found in the OSU Radiation Safety Manual.

Employee Responsibility

Employees are responsible for receiving adequate training for the work they will perform, adhering to applicable rules and regulations, and being familiar with available resources (e.g. Radiation Safety, RS web page, Radiation Safety Manual).

Radiation Safety Manual

The Radiation Safety Manual contains university policies, regulations, and procedures pertaining to radiation safety. The manual also contains required personnel training information and additional useful information. The current manual is produced by Radiation Safety and issued by the Radiation Safety Committee after approval by the Vice President for Finance and Administration.

307: Laboratory Safety

Safety Policy & Procedure Manual
Section 300: Laboratory Safety
Revised: 10/01/2001

Purpose

To protect employees and students from the health hazards presented by hazardous chemicals used in laboratories.

Background Information

There are a variety of physical and chemical hazards associated with work in a laboratory.  The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division has established safety regulations to guide employers in controlling these hazards.  The primary regulation is titled "Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories." This standard mandates that OSU develop a written program that sets forth procedures, equipment, and work practices that are capable of protecting employees from the health hazards presented by hazardous chemicals used in laboratories.  The OSU Chemical Hygiene Plan has been established to meet this requirement and the procedures apply to all OSU laboratories where hazardous chemicals are used.

There are hazards found in laboratories that are not directly related to chemical exposures.  The safety guidelines and requirements established to reduce these hazards are found in University documents such as the Radiation Safety Manual, the Biosafety Manual, and the Laboratory Safety Rules.  Hard copies of these documents along with the OSU Chemical Hygiene Plan can be obtained from Environmental Health & Safety or by accessing the EH&S web page.

Policy

Oregon State University requires that all work occurring in an OSU laboratory be conducted in a safe and healthful manner.  Although students are not considered employees under Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OR-OSHA) regulations, OSU policy applies the requirements of the OSU Chemical Hygiene Plan to teaching laboratories.

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) Responsibilities

The University’s Chemical Hygiene Officer and members of Environmental Health & Safety are responsible for reviewing and updating the Chemical Hygiene Plan, monitoring compliance with the Plan requirements, and assisting employees in understanding the application of the Plan.

Supervisor and Lab Manager Responsibilities

Department heads, principal investigators, and laboratory managers must understand the requirements of the OSU Chemical Hygiene Plan and incorporate these safety procedures into the laboratory operations.  They are also responsible for evaluating the hazards related to their laboratory and establishing appropriate access rules that ensure visitors to the lab are provided with the appropriate guidance and personal protective equipment.

Employee and Student Responsibilities

Faculty, staff, students and volunteer workers in labs are required to follow the laboratory safety procedures established in the OSU Chemical Hygiene Plan, and any additional safety procedures required by the lab manager or supervisor.