Butler, Marvin

COARC Research Garden and Learning Center

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
The Central Oregon Agricultural Research and Learning Center is an ongoing project in its 8th year of activity. The garden provides a hands-on teaching location for local outreach, community programs, and K-12 science field trips. In addition to local programming, the garden provides an opportunity for local OSU Master Gardeners to work and provide services to the local community.

Evaluation of Conventional and Roundup Ready Alfalfa Varieties in Central Oregon, 2014

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
An alfalfa variety trial was established in August, 2011 at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Madras, Oregon. 2014 was the third production year of a four year project to generates yield and quality data under 4-cut management. Ten conventional varieties (including 2 industry standards) and seven Roundup Ready® alfalfa varieties are being evaluated in side by side replicated plots. During 2014 total yield for conventional varieties ranged from 8.5 to 11.8 tons/acre and total yield for Roundup Ready® varieties ranged from 9.7 to 11.7 tons/acre. Average relative feed value (RFV) ratings provide the best indication of overall quality, with all varieties rated Good (126-150) or better for each of the four cuttings. As expected, forth cutting RFV ratings were significantly higher than the three previous cuttings. Comparison of average quality scores across conventional and Roundup Ready® varieties show a similar performance with RFV ratings ranging from 144 to 160 for conventional varieties and 145 to 155 for Roundup Ready®.

Central Oregon Potato Extension Program

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
Insect pests were monitored in potato fields to assess potential risk of disease transmission. Aphid, tuberworm moths, and potato psyllids were collected and counted weekly using water pans for aphids, delta traps for potato tuberworm and yellow sticky traps for psyllids. This information was distributed to growers, fieldman and industry representatives through the Potato Patches newsletter. During 2014 aphid numbers were moderately high at the beginning of the season, averaging fifteen to seventy-seven aphids per trap before decreasing to below twenty in mid-July, followed by a slight rebounded in mid-September. Potato tuberworm moths were found in very low numbers through the season. During 2014 the first recorded incidence of potato psyllid was detected in Jefferson County. Specimens were tested for the pathogen causing zebra chip, (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum), and all tested negative. Early blight prediction modeling and crop water use data provided helpful information for seed potato management. Weekly monitoring and reporting through the Potato Patches newsletter continues to be a significant source of information for integrated pest management in Central Oregon potato fields.

Electronic Mint Pest Alert Newsletter to Promote Optimal Application of Coragen® to Control Mint Root Borer, Cutworms, Armyworms and Loopers

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
An electronic newsletter was developed for the peppermint production regions in Oregon to assist growers and fieldmen to consider control of mint root borers, cutworms, armyworms and loopers during the growing season prior to crop damage. The newsletter was designed to help with timing of this new insecticide application strategy and to be used in conjunction with existing field monitoring/scouting programs. Extension Agents from the Willamette Valley and Union County were valuable cooperators and provided scouting services to confirm insect development model accuracy. A formal survey of those receiving the newsletter indicated 91 percent considered the weekly newsletter to be either very useful or somewhat useful.

Evaluation of Predator Mites for Control of Two-Spotted Spider Mites in Carrots Grown for Hybrid Seed in Central Oregon

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
Two-spotted spider mites (TSSM) are an important pest on hybrid carrot seed production in central Oregon. Predator mites have been used to successfully control TSSM in peppermint production in central. This preliminary project was conducted to determine if there is potential for the use of predator mites in carrots. Circumstantial evidence from the results suggests predator mites were successfully established, they were successful in reducing TSSM populations, they were able to effectively disperse throughout the field, predators can be introduced in the fields with moderate amounts of TSSM and they may be able to keep populations at a commercially acceptable level.

Evaluation of Miticides for Two-Spotted Spider Mite Control in Carrots Grown for Hybrid Seed in Central Oregon

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
Two-spotted spider mites (TSSM) are an important pest on hybrid carrot seed production in central Oregon. Concern about the two-week knock down period and re-entry interval (REI) for Comite (propargite) prompted a search for other products that could be used. Plots were established in two commercial fields in central Oregon. All treatments generally provided greater control than the untreated check, with statistical differences between treated and untreated plots at one location. The trend was for Agri-Mek (abamectin) to provide similar results to Comite and Oberon (spiromesifen) and to sometimes provide greater control of TSSM than Comite.

Evaluation of Herbicides to Provide Control and Seed Head Suppression of Creeping Bentgrass

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2014
Abstract: 
Glyphosate tolerant creeping bentgrass (Agrostisstolonifera L.) accidentally escaped from production fields in 2003 and is now found growing along irrigation ditches in Jefferson County. During 2014 three research projects were conducted at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center (COARC) to evaluate herbicide control of plants of various size, potential new herbicide options and varied approaches to seed head suppression. Poast provided greater control than Finale whether plants were grown from 2-inch, 4-inch or 6-inch plugs, with the greatest efficacy on the smallest plants. When applied alone Accord provided 100 percent control, Topramezone provided 81 percent control and Sonar provided 63 percent control. The combination of Topramezone plus Sonar provided 94 percent control. Seed head suppression was best achieved with a propane flamer at either boot stage or flowering.

Summary Report of Conventional and Roundup Ready Alfalfa Variety Yield and Quality over Four Production Years in Central Oregon, 2011-2015

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2015
Abstract: 
An alfalfa variety trial was established in August, 2011 at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Madras, Oregon. The trial includes ten conventional varieties and seven Roundup Ready varieties. Yield and quality data were collected under a 4-cut management system over four production seasons from 2012 to 2015. Results indicate average annual hay yields of 8.5 to 11 tons/acre and average Relative Feed Value (RFV) ranging from 145 to 160, largely in the Premium quality rating. Initial stand establishment and stand longevity were 90 percent or better across all varieties.

Evaluation of N Fertilizer Rate and Timing on Wheat Yield

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2015
Abstract: 
This project sought to evaluate the effects of N rate and timing on yield and grain protein content in irrigated winter wheat grown in central Oregon. Currently, many wheat producers in the area apply N fertilizer in the fall, rather than in the spring, due to logistical concerns of weather, soil moisture, and workload. By evaluating the effect of fall and spring applications of N, we aim to provide guidance for growers on when to apply N fertilization in an effort to maximize grain yield. Large-scale plots were used to assess N rate and timing effects on grain yield, test weight and protein percentage. To trace the fate of fertilizer N, 15N labeled urea was applied to micro-plots in fall and spring, and soil and biomass samples were collected and analyzed to track recovery of the 15N labeled urea. Winter wheat grain yield for 2013-14 and 2014-15 where soil test N was high was largely unresponsive to N fertilization. The labeled 15N urea was recovered primarily from the top six inches of soil and losses ranged from 0 to 30% in 2013-14. Winter wheat response to N fertilization in central Oregon is highly variable likely due to variation in soil depths and textures as well as soil N supply related to crop rotation.

Central Oregon Potato Extension Program

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Series/Report number: 
COARC2015
Abstract: 
Aphids, tuberworm moths, potato psyllids, and beet leafhoppers were collected and counted weekly in Jefferson County from June 23 to September 9, 2015. Counts were conducted to monitor pest populations and assess potential risk of disease transmission. Collection methods included fifteen water pans for aphid collection, 15 delta traps for potato tuberworm moth, and 15 yellow sticky traps each for psyllid and beet leafhopper. Weekly findings were distributed to growers, fieldmen and industry representatives through reports and website postings. Aphid numbers were low during the first week of monitoring followed by a spike for 2 weeks into a moderately high level at the end of June. Numbers then remained low until rising in August and continued at a high level until trap removal on September 9, 2015. In contrast to 2014, potato tuberworm moths were detected only sporadically and in low numbers during two weeks in August. Potato psyllids were present in increasing numbers starting the week of August 5 until vine kill. Specimens were tested for Lso (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum) and all tested negative. Beet leafhoppers were included in the 2015 protocol for the first time in the history of this project and were found mostly in single digit numbers. Specimens trapped after August 5th were tested for the presence of BLTVA phytoplasma and all tested negative. Early blight prediction modeling and crop water use data provided helpful information for seed potato management and weekly monitoring continues to be a significant source of information for integrated pest management in central Oregon potato fields.
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