Butler, Marvin

Electronic Mint Pest Alert Newsletter Regarding Control of Mint Root Borer, Cutworm Complex and Loopers (Year 3)

Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
An electronic newsletter was developed for the peppermint production regions in Oregon to assist growers and fieldmen consider control of mint root borers, cutworms, armyworms and loopers during the growing season prior to crop damage. Recommendations of optimal insecticide application timing were based on the insect development models, and were provided through weekly e-Newsletters in each region from mid-June until the end of July. Extension Agents from the Willamette Valley, Central Oregon, and Union County provided scouting services to confirm insect development model accuracy. A formal survey of those receiving the newsletter indicates that the newsletter was well received, provided information valuable to growers and crop consultants, and respondents would all like to see the newsletter continue.

Evaluation of Potential New Insecticide in Carrots for Lygus Control

Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
Lygus bugs feeding on carrots grown for seed during flowering and seed maturation reduce seed viability. Potential new insecticides for control of lygus in carrots were evaluated in alfalfa and carrots plots at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center (COARC). Sulfoxaflor (Transform) and flupyradifurone (Sivanto) were compared to the industry standard, naled (Dibrom 8) plus lambda-cyhalothrin (Warrior II) and an untreated check. Although Transform was effective one week after application, Dibrom 8 plus Warrior II was the only effective treatment compared to the untreated check in subsequent evaluations and across the three sampling dates.

Evaluation of Potential New Insecticides and Fungicides for Honey Bee Repellency in Seed Carrots

Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
To insure honey bee safety during crop pollination, potential new products were screened for bee repellency. This research was conducted in a carrot steckling field at the Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center (COARC). Bee visits were counted beginning one day after bees were brought into the field and continued for a total of four counts. There was no statistical difference between treated and untreated plots, indicating no detrimental effect on bee activity from these products.

Evaluation of Potential New Herbicides in Carrots Applied as a Directed Spray at Layby

Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
Weed resistance to ongoing use of Lorox in carrots grown for seed is a concern to industry representatives and growers. This project was established to evaluate two new products compared to current industry standard treatments. Spartan (sulfentrazone) is used in peppermint production and there is local knowledge about the spectrum of weed that it is effective on. Results from a directed spray application at layby indicate that it may provide a good fit in carrot seed production.

Evaluation of Herbicides for Control of Rough Bluegrass, Cheatgrass, Rattail Fescue and Medusahead in Establishment Year and Second Year Kentucky Bluegrass Grown for Seed

Series/Report number: 
COARC2016
Abstract: 
Adequate weed control during the establishment year of Kentucky bluegrass seed production is a challenge, particularly for grassy weeds in a grass crop. This project is a second-year project to evaluate innovative ways to use currently registered products to accomplish this goal, focusing on rough bluegrass, cheatgrass, rattail fescue and medusahead. Treatments and application timings include Callisto pre-emergence between planting and first irrigation, Beacon applied at 0.19 oz/acre, with and without Bronate at 1 pt/acre, at the 2-3 leaf and 4-5 leaf stages, and Beacon at the split application rate of 0.38 oz/acre during a October/November timing. Potential new herbicides, Fierce, Alion and Sharpen were evaluated in a second year stand for control of the same four grassy weeds and for crop safety, compared to two current industry standards. Application timings were pre-emergence and during October/November. Results from establishment year plots indicates significantly less stunting of Kentucky bluegrass when Beacon is applied at 2-3 leaf rather than the 1-2 leaf stage as was done during 2015. Bronate appears to be an effective crop safener when added to Beacon at either 2-3 leaf or 4-5 leaf stages, with similar control of the grassy weeds.
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