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Kathleen Caprario-Ulrich

Art Instructor, Kathleen Caprario-Ulrich

Kathleen Caprario-Ulrich
Instructor, Foundations

541-737-5018 / 201 Fairbanks Hall / KathleenCaprarioUlrich@oregonstate.edu

THE LAKE MAPS SERIES STATEMENT

Initiated while on an awarded retreat in June, 2009 at The Morris Graves’ Foundation, Loleta, CA., several simultaneous routes of inquiry are explored in resulting work.

Landscape and the relationship of Self to Nature have been at the core of my work. It is the wonder of things and that moment when beauty overwhelms the senses and quietly infiltrates and transforms the viewer’s perception that compels me. My work is a response to the sublime through
observational research and the identification of landscape motifs that are re-imagined as a dynamic union with place. Viewer location, the relationship of the far reaching vs. the fixed gaze, the simultaneity of presence and absence, as well as the cultural and fractal dynamics of pattern are all areas of overlapping concern. An interest in the mathematical patterning of Zellij design (I took a course with Jean-Marc Castera in 2006) and Penrose tiling as well as fractal expressionism and the inquiry into Jackson Pollock’s oeuvre by Richard Taylor has also informed the work.

There is a familiarity with patterning and shadows that references the iconography of the photographic negative as well as the repetition of wallpaper—often a benign and innocuous component in a room or space. In our perception the patterns that exist in the nature are frequently relegated to the role of backdrop. By isolating the patterns that exist in nature, that which in context may be overlooked and disregarded, the viewer is afforded a new point of view and an appreciation of the textures and fractal patterning of self-similarity that while often relegated to the role of backdrop resonates deeply within our experience of the world. Both the Drift and Shadow Map series were realized plein-aire and in real-time as the position of the sun, clouds and the wind impacted their making and material handling—a mapping system of that moment in time. My interest in pattern can be traced back to my work as a textile designer in New York City in the 1970’s while my 30+ years of working in Oregon has seen the work evolve conceptually, materially and rooted uniquely in a Northwest mystical tradition.

Art Instructor, Kathleen Caprario-UlrichArt Instructor, Kathleen Caprario-UlrichArt Instructor, Kathleen Caprario-UlrichArt Instructor, Kathleen Caprario-Ulrich

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OSU Dept of Art