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Goose Lake Fishes

Goose Lake is a closed interior basin that straddles the Oregon-California border. The basin contains a unique and relatively diverse native fish assemblage.  Nine fish species are native to Goose Lake (listed below), four of which are endemic, and five of which have federal status under the Endangered Species Act.  In 1996, in response to severe drought and habitat degradation, the Goose Lake Fishes Working Group drafted a conservation and monitoring plan for all native species. However, prior to our efforts in 2007, little data describing distribution and abundance was collected, and the last survey conducted in 1994 occurred only on public land.  Other field work has been limited and sporadic, targeting only Goose Lake redband trout and Modoc sucker. 

Goose Lake Basin Native Fish Species

Species

 Federal Status

Goose Lake Redband Trout

species of concern

Goose Lake Lamprey

species of concern

Pit-Klamath Brook Lamprey

 

Goose Lake Tui Chub

 

Goose Lake Sucker

species of concern

Modoc Sucker

endangered

Speckled Dace

 

Pit Roach

species of concern

Pit Sculpin

 

orange = endemic

 

In 2007, The Native Fish Investigations Project conducted a comprehensive distribution survey for all native fish in the Goose Lake Basin.  Sites were randomly selected and spatially balanced to ensure a representative sample.  Considerable effort was made to obtain permission to privately owned land.  Field crews used a variety of sampling gears, both active (electrofishing) and passive (trap nets, minnow traps, etc), to capture species in a wide range of habitat types.  Results describe current distribution and serve as a baseline reference for future monitoring work and habitat restoration projects.

 

 

Annual Reports and Publications:

Scheerer, P.D., S.L. Gunckel, M.P. Heck, and S.E. Jacobs. 2010. Status and Distribution of Native Fishes in the Goose Lake Basin. Northwestern Naturalist 91: 271-287.  

Heck, P.M., P.D. Scheerer, S.L. Gunckel, and S.E. Jacobs. 2008. Status and Distribution of Native Fishes in the Goose Lake Basin. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Information Report 2008-02. Corvallis.  

Goose Lake Fishes Working Group (GLFWG). 1995. Goose Lake Fishes Conservation Strategy, OR.

Send comments or questions regarding this webpage to  Shaun.Clements@oregonstate.edu