Student Life Annual Reports

Annual Report Graphic

Annual Report 2013
Annual Report 2012

Annual Report 2013

Student Life Annual Report Chart Graphic

Student Life Offices
Office of the Dean of Student Life Report Career Services Report Childcare and Family Resources Report Disability Access Services Report
Healthy Campus Initiative Report ASOSU Office of Advocacy Report ASOSU Student Advocate Report Human Services Resource Center Report
New Student Programs and Family Outreach Report Student Conduct and Community Standards Student, Family and Community Support Report Veterans Information Report

ODOSL Annual Report 2012-2013

Office of the Dean of Student Life Banner

Our Mission

Our mission is to provide educational and developmental opportunities for students to make informed decisions that support their success at Oregon State University. We are dedicated to providing an environment that will enable students to effectively engage in their academic and intellectual work.

Program Highlights

DOSL Central

  • DOSL provided leadership for and collaborated with the Academic Advising Council to develop the "Guidelines for Students, Faculty and Professional Staff Regarding Student Bereavement." The guidelines were approved by Faculty Senate in May of 2013.

Everyone Matters @ OSU

The Everyone Matters campaign is a six-month global social media campaign to foster inclusiveness and reduce intolerance. Faculty, staff, administrators, and students are encouraged to participate in the campaign by:

  • Everyone Matters at OSU partnered with Residential Life, RHA, the Office of Equity and Inclusion, and the Valley Library and its Choose Civility campaign.
  • Over 1,000 commitment (to inclusivity and non-judgement) cards were filled out by students, faculty, and staff.
  • Campaigns via Facebook reached more than 45,000 users.

CSSA Leadership

The College Student Services Administration (CSSA) program at Oregon State University comprises a community of practitioners-scholars who strive to advance the field of student affairs through the preparation and continuing education of professional colleagues at the Master's level. The program's primary mission is to prepare individuals for professional administrative positions in student services departments at two- and four-year colleges and universities. The curriculum emphasizes administrative leadership and management of programs and services. The CSSA program is a master's program academically housed in OSU's new School of Education and professionally housed within Student Affairs.

  • This year, DOSL let the central coordination and the student support of the College Student Services Administration (CSSA) program and all Adult and Higher Education (AHE) undergraduate courses. We built relationships with the College of Education.
  • As part of the coordination of CSSA, DOSL also took leadership of all Adult and Higher Education (AHE) undergraduate courses including management of courses, faculty connections, etc.
  • We began to see a change within the program in terms of the first-year cohort. They began their tenure in the program with a social justice retreat, which led smaller groups within CSSA to begin and carry on social justice conversations such as the Christian caucus.
  • Much of the work with CSSA Leadership was relationship-based. Relationships needed in some cases to be built, in some cases mended, and maintained.

NASPA Undergraduate Fellows Program (NUFP)

The NASPA Undergraduate Fellows program is a semi-structured mentoring program for undergraduate students wishing to explore and better understand the field of student affairs and/or higher education. The mission of the NASPA Undergraduate Fellows Program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented professionals in student affairs, including but not limited to those of racial and ethnic-minority background; those having a disability; and those identifying as LGBTQ.

  • The NUFP program experienced its largets year yet at OSU with 13 Scholars involved in various leadership roles on campus including various leadership roles within Student Life, University Housing and Dining, Diversity Development, and Women's Studies.
  • This winter, AHE 499: Explorations of Higher Education doubled in size from the previous year, proving to be the largest enrollment in the class' history.

DOSL Internships

At OSU educational experiences go beyond the classroom. The Dean of Student Life Office has provided opportunity for students to explore their interest of working in a student affairs office through short-term internships. This year, 18 interns have completed a range of projects from assisting in syllabus development, resource guide creation, CSSA related events including Campus Days and transition-related events.

  • The work in developing internships with DOSL Central for NUFP Scholars expanded. Kim McAloney attended a session at the NASPA Annual Conference that discussed intentional internship development around learning outcomes. Based on a few examples from the session, Kim was able to incorporate pieces into the internship structure to create a more holistic and educational experience for intens.
  • Kim McAloney has begun consulting regarding building student employment and internships around learning outcomes (LGGs) with the College of Engineering and the Academic Success Center. OSU Human Resources has asked Kim to be available for trainings and consultations as this model is a best practice at OSU.
  • DOSL Central had 18 interns (8 graduate students; 10 undergraduate students) throughout the year. Projects included course devvelopment, website conversion and management, social justice initiatives, CSSA Campus Days, NUFP summer interns, and NUFP program development.
  • DOSL internships were improved based on research done on self-authorship, leadership for a better world, sentipensante pedagogy, the CAS standards, and an OSU Career Services internship best practices rubric.
  • We developed a social justice initiatives intern for a CSSA student to assist with the incoming cohorts' social justice immersion and to work with the NUFP pre-conference for the Western Regional Conference.

Video(s)

Introduction to Dean of Student Life

I am an OSU NUFP!

OSU NUFP Video

Statistic Highlights

  • 8 Students attended NASPA conferences
  • 18 DOSL Interns
  • 1,490 Internship hours at 12 institutions outside of OSU
  • 5,720 Internship hours in 45 different OSU programs

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/deanofstudents

Email

deanofstudents@oregonstate.edu

Career Services Annual Report 2012-2013

Career Services Banner

Our Mission

To empower, support, and nurture OSU students and alumni in their exploration and pursuit of lifelong career success and meaningful employment in a diverse world.

Goals

  • Educate students, alumni, and the OSU campus communities on the lifelong nature of career development, the process of gaining occupational self-awareness, and developing skills and strategies for identifying and securing meaningful employment.
  • Empower students to engage in experiential opportunities, employment, and networking that will help them reach their professional goals, and challenge them to become global and productive citizens.
  • Develop and maintain relationships with alumni, employers, the OSU campuses, and global communities in order to support and provide professionally significant opportunities for OSU students and alumni.

New Initiatives

  • Career Trail-Prep by Step: Introduction of our online career development self-directed and interactive program to reach students and alumni 24 hours per day, making accessibility for all students (including Ecampus) at their fingertips. Career Trail engages faculty and staff by providing a resource for staff including curriculum that can be used individiually or in a classroom setting. Career Trail supports users at diverse levels of development and needs including:
    • Know Yourself
    • Know the World of Work
    • Develop Tools and Skills
    • Learn How to Connect

    Find this on our Career Services website, http://oregonstate.edu/career/trail.

  • Beaver Job Blast: 73% of students are opted in to receiving emails about job postings that are related to their area of study.
  • Inaugural Virtual Career Fair 2012-2013: All-majors fair offered online for the first time with 12 employers and 270 students participating (471 students registered).
  • Student and Alumni Highlights: Monthly rotating highlights are easily visible on our Career Services website http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/careerservices/?cat=154542
  • Collaborating with OSU Alumni Association
    • Portland Career Event: Career Counseling and Advising for Alums were provided to 14 alums on June 10, 2013 (11 counseling appointments and 9 resume review appointments).
    • Collaborating with Career Development Committee at OSU: Partnering with and participating in new campus wide group, Career Connections on OSU campus to strengthen career development at OSU.
  • Collaborating with University Exploratory Studies Program: Providing Sigi3, an Education and Career Planning Software for the Web. This program assists undecided students and alumni to explore values, interests, and personality traits that impact choices about their major and career path.

Statistics

  • Student engagement in Career Development is increasing with additional requests for individual appointments as well as with group presentations. Students engage in discussions focusing on many topics including how to choose a major, what to do with my major, resume development, interviewing skills, networking, social media in the job search, and how to be transition ready for their new career.
  • Trends in OSU Career Services from 2008 to 2013, with a minimum of 60% growth in Counseling and Advising Appointments, Drop In Appointments, Ecampus Career Counseling Appointments and Outreach Presentations over 5 years

  • A Career Fair is one of the ways students connect with employers to develop relationships, network, and connect to learn more about internships and employment opportunities. On campus recruiting and interviewing engages students, alumni and employers. Connecting Students and Employers through Career Fairs, Interviews, and OSU's Beaver Job Net

Program Highlights

  • Career Beavers Blog: Named one of the top four blogs for career information in Oregon by Mac's List (a local job board site for the Portland area). Read the post here.
  • Career Services Website: Based on Google Analytics, the Career Services website increased unique users every month compared to the same month last year (October - May), with a total increase of 6,719 users. Looking at October 1, 2012 - June 1, 2013, there are 41.2% new visitors and 58.8% returning visitors with the average time spent on the site at 2 minutes, 3 seconds.
  • Online Seminars: 12 seminars on a variety of topics are now available online for easy access.
  • Nonprofit and Volunteering Expo: Boasted 793 (up 145%) attendees and 53 (down 12%) employer participants compaed to 2012.
  • Collaboration: College of public Health and Human Services Majors Fair 2013
    • 92% of respondents to the CPHHS Survey reported that they are planning to complete at least one internship during their time in college.
  • Experiential Learning: 53.5% of graduating senior respondents in the OSU Senior Survey engaged in experiential learning (internships) while completing their education at OSU.
  • Employer's View of Experiential Learning/Internships:
    • 59% of respondents shared that their organization was more likely to hire a new college graduate with internship experience than one without internship experience.
    • 67% of employers reported that their company/organization currently has an internship program.
  • Active Facebook Fans in 2013: 1,639

Accomplishments

  • Career Services Advisory Committee (established in 2012): Created to establish a strategic partnership between Career Services and employers representing diverse industries who are also some of our key stakeholders. The meetings successfully engaged employer support of career development and program advancement for students, as well as helped foster the critical link between employers on recruiting trends, needs from each industry, and valuable input and suggestions to ensure we are adequately preparing our students for the workforce.
    The Committee has 11 members representing the following industries:
    • Retail
    • Education
    • Recruiting
    • Finance
    • Automotive
    • Small Business
    • Consulting
    • Volunteer
    • Non-Profit

Connecting Students and Employers through Career Fairs, Interviews, and OSU's Beaver Job Net

Student/Alum Spotlight

Featured student/alum of the month, Jessica Hua

Ready to get inspired for your job, internship, or career search? Each month we will spotlight an OSU student that has inspired us when it comes to their career development. Check out their success stories—besides inspiration, they also show that academic major does not have to restrict your goals and that there are many ways to define success.

 

"It has always been a dream of mine to go to Africa to volunteer and now, I've been given the amazing opportunity to serve as an intern with Child Health Family International and IE3 Global Internships. I discovered this internship primarily through a career fair last winter while visiting IE3 Global Internship's booth. There, the representatives gave me pamphlets and flyers leading me to further resources online, which all helped me find the program I was passionate about."

Read Jessica's success story on the Career Beavers Blog.

Statistics

  • 1639 Active Facebook Fans in 2013
  • 1,591 Career Counseling Sessions
  • 31% Career Counseling Sessions Growth Compared to 2012
  • 215 Ecampus Phone & Skype Sessions
  • 1,182 Drop-In Appointment Sessions
  • 4,371 Students Attended Career Fairs
  • 431 Employers Attended Career Fairs

Quotes

I wanted to say thank you again for your help at our sessions these past couple of weeks. While I watched your presentation in my seminar class and have been exposed to the basics of Career Services, as well as career-searching in general, the information never "clicked". Being able to discuss options, methods, and just be able to ask general questions about looking for a career has helped me start on the right track. Not having much of a background or role models to look on to, having this service and taking advantage of it was really beneficial. Again, thank you for taking the time to help me, and I will be keeping in touch on my progress.

Jessica Randall

Attachment

Link to Career Services 2011-2012 Annual Report PDF

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/career

Email

Career.Services@oregonstate.edu

Childcare and Family Resources Annual Report 2012-2013

Childcare and Family Resources Banner

Our Mission

The Childcare and Family Resources office supports parents at OSU by advocating for student parent needs as well as the needs of all parents and caregivers on campus and by providing direct services, child care and other family centered resources in support of a parent's academic and professional success.

Program Highlights

  • Opened second Our Little Village free drop-off child care site in the Dixon Recreation Center, OLV/Dixon, demonstrating continued student support of this important campus service to students with children
  • Highest use to date of the Our Little Village free drop-off child care sites serving 130 student-parents and 169 children with an average of 938 hours of care provided per term
  • Continued and increased student-fee funding for child care subsidies with $79,000 distributed to 82 student-parents (43 Undergrads, 29 Grads, 5 Veterans, 29 International - approximate as students may have multiple designations) with over $1 million in subsidy dollars disbursed since 1996
  • 72 student-parent families served by our nationally accredited campus child care center, Beaver Beginnings
  • Presented, in collaboration with Human Services Resource Center and Veterans Resources, "Overlapping Identities: Teamwork to Meet Convergent Needs" at the annual NASPA Conference
  • Adminstered the Friend-Raisers Faculty/Staff child care subsidy, serving 7 families with a total disbursement of $8000
  • Served over 50 mothers, both students and faculty/staff (including five campus visitors) through our network of lactation rooms - a 75% increase from the previous year

Accomplishments

  • 2nd Annual Bring Your Kids to Campus Day, a campus wide event (coinciding with the National Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day), in which student-parents and all parents in the University community are welcomed and encouraged to share with their children the value of an education in a hands-on, interactive day. One hundred forty-two students, faculty and staff with children attended (35% increase from previous year) one or more events/offerings with close to 200 children attending throughout the day
  • Joy Drive – Due to the generosity of 28 departments/individuals/alumni from across campus, 47 student parent families and 87 children received wrapped gifts during the holiday season
  • Through OLV/Library and OLV/Dixon free drop-off child care sites, CFR provided students the opportunity for paid employment in the area directly related to their interests and academic program; an opportunity to gain hands on, professional experience in a child care setting
  • Planned and executed several significant campus child care center facility improvements: installed new flooring throughout 50% of the center, purchased and installed a new outside play structure, renovated landscape on the north and west sides of the building, placed new signage

Statistics

  • OSU Student FAFSA Filer with Children (2000 - 2012) OSU Student FAFSA Filer with Children
  • Graduate Student as a % of Applicant Pool (2007 - 2012) Graduate Student as a % of Applicant Pool
  • International Students as a % of the Child Subsidy Applicant Pool (2007 - 2012) International Student as a % of the Child Subsidy Applicant Pool

Statistic Highlights

  • 75% Increase in Mothers Served through Lactation Rooms
  • 130 Student parents served at Our Little Village free drop-off child care sites
  • 143 University Parents and Children at Bring Your Kids to Campus Day
  • $79K Child Care Subsidies Dispersed from Student-Fee Funding

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/childcare

Email

FamilyResources@oregonstate.edu

Disability Access Services Annual Report 2012-2013

Disability Access Services Banner

Our Mission

Disability Access Services (DAS) facilitates access to University programs and services for students, faculty, staff and visitors with disabilities through accommodations, education, consultation, and advocacy.

Goals

  • Provide effective accommodations for students with disabilities based on law and current best practices.
  • Provide education and consultation to the campus community about disability issues.
  • Positively influence decision-making and practices that promote inclusive and accessible programs and services for students, faculty, staff, and visitors at Oregon State University.
  • Promote and facilitate individual responsibility for requesting, using, amending, and canceling accommodations due to disability.

Assessment

Working with DAS - Student Satisfaction Survey

In response to a student satisfaction survey conducted during Winter Term 2013, 88% of DAS students rated their overall satisfaction as "good" or better; 4% of students were "neither satisfied nor dissatisfied," and 8% of students expressed some level of dissatisfaction. In reading the students' comments, it is apparent that the percentage of satisfied students might actually be higher, given that several reasons for dissatisfaction were often identified as issues with faculty, rather than with the services of DAS.

Program Highlights

  • Implemented a Real Time Visibility Solution using AeroScout hardware/software to track accessible furniture and improve the student experience utilizing ADA compliant furniture as an accommodation at Oregon State University. The RLTS tracks furniture using AeroScout's Wi-Fi-based Active RFID tags and our wireless network. We are currently tracking over 450 assets in over 400 different classrooms.
  • Implemented the ADA Parking Monitoring System to increase utilization and improve monitoring of ADA parking on campus. For this project, small sensors will be installed in a selection of ADA parking spaces on campus. The sensors will be connected to a network of repeaters which allows real time monitoring and data collection. The utilization data gathered will assist OSU's Transportation and Parking Services and DAS to develop programs and report on ADA parking utilization. The network system also has a smart phone and iPad app that will show real time ADA parking availability to students, visitors, faculty, and staff. This project is a pilot project and will only cover a subset of ADA parking on campus, but if it is successful, it may be expanded to cover all ADA parking on campus in the future.
  • DAS collaborated with OSU Valley Library and Sorenson VRI to provide free remote relay service and hardware for deaf and hard of hearing students or staff. OSU Valley Library was generous in providing location and resources (i.e. internet access) for this service.
  • DAS Testing Center has been consolidated and relocated to Heckart Lodge in January 2012. In this facility allows DAS to administer more than 3000 exams last years.

Accomplishments

  • The pilot study of the use of TypeWell to support English comprehension in the classroom was concluded. A report will be submitted to the Vice Provost of Student Affairs during Fall Term 2013.
  • A DAS staff member was a co-presenter for the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) Assessment and Persistence conference in Denver, Colorado: Envisioning a Culture of Inquiry at Oregon State University.
  • DAS staff collaborated with students from Saudi Arabia who are members of a national organization called "Hand of Hope." The goal of the organization is to promote access for people with disabilities in other countries. Students stated that they believe OSU is a model for accommodating students with disabilities, and a staff member in DAS was filmed discussing services offered by DAS. The film will be used to educate people about disabilities in the students' home countries.
  • DAS coordinated with EntryPoint, the signature program of the AAAS Project on Science, Technology, and Disability, to recruit OSU students with disabilities studying science, engineering, mathematics, and computer science for paid summer internships with leading organizations. Two students were hired this year for internships with NASA, at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The student at the Langley Research Center worked with supersonic flight, and the student at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory worked with the Novel image processing technique. The numbers of students hired is notable when compared with other institutions (typically only one student is hired), and two years ago, the number hired was 5, which placed DAS among the top Entrypoint/AAAS recruiting sites in the country.

Awards

  • Two DAS staff members received Outstanding Services Awards for the Division of Student Affairs.
    • Jo Alexander
    • Jennifer Gossett

Ongoing Projects & Collaboration

  • DAS is collaborating with the Office of Equity and Inclusion to create an online training for faculty related to the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act, and the Fair Housing Act.
  • DAS staff are collaborating with academic faculty to create a Disability Studies minor at OSU.
  • DAS staff collaborated with E-Campus and the School of Language, Culture, and Society to identify an instructor and provide support for an online American Sign Language (ASL) class. The class was so popular that ASL I and II will be offered on campus during Fall term, 2013. A Deaf Culture class is being developed, to be offered Spring term, 2014.

Video(s)

  • Student Employee Interview with Michele Bromley

Statistics

  • Accommodation Requests by Program
    Description FY 2013 2013 vs.
    2011
    FY 2012 FY 2011
    Total Accommodation Requests 5523 41.6% 4865 3900
    Number of Classes with Accommodations 3312 35.4% 2928 2446
    Alternative Formats - Total Requests 961 16.9% 889 822
    Alternative Formats - Number of Classes 926 31.7% 766 703
    Alternative Testing - Total Exam Requests 3779 46.9% 3333 2572
    Deaf and Hard of Hearing - Total Requests 290 37.4% 215 211
    Deaf and Hard of Hearing - Video Processed (Minutes) 7532 149.2% 7769 3022
    Notetaking Services - Total Requests 2632 30.5% 2487 2017
    Notetaking Services - Number of Classes 1748 46.6% 1272 1192
    Notetaking Services - Number Invoices Generated 1238 44.8% 975 855
  • Number of Students Served In fiscal year 2009, 609 students were served through Disability Access Services. In 2010, 646 students were served, and in 2011, 739 students received services from D.A.S. In 2012, D.A.S. provided services for 780 students, and ended 2013 with 936 active students.
  • Number of Accommodation Requests In fiscal year 2009, DAS recieved 2,869 accommodation requests. In 2010, accommodation requests rose to 3,248, and then to 3,900 in 2011. In 2012, OSU Disability Access Services received 4,865 requests for accommodations, which increased to 5,523 in 2013.

Statistic Highlights

  • 91.1% DAS Students with Good Standing
  • 5,523 Number of Accommodation Requests
  • 936 Student with Disabilities Served in 2013
  • 54% Increase in Students Served (2009 vs 2013)
  • $185K Dollars Returned to Students

About Us

Website

http://ds.oregonstate.edu

Email

Disability.Services@oregonstate.edu

Healthy Campus Initiative Annual Report 2012-2013

Healthy Campus Initiatives Banner

Our Mission

To promote health and well-being for students, faculty, and staff at OSU. Through collective action and input from the OSU community, we identify health priorities and advocate for policies, services, and environments that systemically support health and wellness.

Vision

By emphasizing a culture of well-being, we support individuals and our community in adopting and maintaining healthy behaviors to improve quality of life. A healthy campus provides added value, beyond what individuals provide for themselves. The Oregon State University campus will be known around the world for cultivating an environment so infused with well-being that it requires conscious effort to "opt-out" of positive health choices. HCI supports a campus environment that fosters health and wel-being for all community members to learn, grow, and achieve. There are four focus areas: Be Active, Eat Well, Manage Stress, Smoke-free OSU. Also, HCI collaboration occurs with Spiritual Well-Being, Community Development, and Human Resources.

Goals

  • Be Active Goals: Promote and enhance physical activities/resources, programs and events; Create awareness and positive behavioral changes in the area of physical activity; Increase the proportion of OSU students, faculty and staff meeting physical activity guidelines as set by the American College of Sports Medicine.
  • Eat Healthy Goals: Encourage members of the OSU community to eat more fruits and vegetables and choose water over sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Manage Stress Goals: Reduce the percentage of students whose academics are negatively affected by: Stress, Anxiety, Sleep Disorders, Colds and flu and Work.
  • Smoke-free Goals: Support a Smoke-free environment at OSU through campus No Smoking policy and Nicotine Replacement Therapy

Accomplishments

Eat Healthy

  • As part of CONNECT week, HCI co-sponsored the New Student Picnic. Healthier food choices were provided and activity tables were in the middle of the Quad. Follow up activities were planned and carried out through HHS 231, in Dining Centers, a cooking class sponsored by Peer Health Advocates and continued messaging around the "My Plate" theme.
  • The "Fresh from the Faucet" campaign gave out over 700 water bottles during the New Student Picnic. From '10-'11 school year to the '11-'12 school year, there was a 10.4% decrease in bottled Pepsi and Aquafina sales. There was a significant increase in water usage at water stations in the Memorial Union and Snell Hall.
  • Brought Behavior Economist for Cornell, Katherine Hoy, to campus for external review of Food Services practices. One result was an increased emphasis on photos and visual imagery leading to a 73% increase in Pacific City salad sales at one concept.
  • Supported National Nutrition Month and Nutrition and Dietetics students through the mini-grant program.
  • Environmental Scan was completed (Public Health model for program improvement) and presented to Healthy Eating committee and campus consituents.
  • Supported two Fruit and Veggie Flash mobs. A dancing Gorilla and free bananas. Creatively engaging students.

Be Active

  • 3rd Annual Be Well Walk and Run brought in more than 400 registrants, and more than 350 participated despite a rainy, cold afternoon.
  • Environmental Scan completed and helped to re-energize the "Be Active" committee to reconvene and support physical activity objectives across campus.
  • Beaver Strides Walking program subsidy for faculty and staff was funded through a grant by Pacific Source Health plans. This year registration increased by 83% and active participants who finished the program increased to 70 and 80% for winter and spring terms.
  • The Sit Less, Move More campaign went campuswide and supported being active by taking regular breaks for standing or exercising. Partnering with RecSports, "exercise breaks" are offered for meetings on campus.
  • Wellness Week occurred during Spring Term, highlighting the myriad of activities across campusto support individual and community health.

Smoke-Free OSU

  • The first year of a Smoke-Free campus provided several challenges and work around communication, education and enforcement.
  • A newly formed "Smoke-Free OSU" task force met 5 times in an effort to identify areas of concern and solutions.
  • Partners in Smoke-Free OSU are: Student Health Services, Facilities Services, University Housing and Dining, INTO OSU, International Programs, Student Conduct and Community Standards and Public Safety.
  • A master's student in public health is working to engage International Students in continued dialogue about Smoke-Free OSU and resources available on campus.
  • Nicotine Replacement Therapy through Student Health Services was funded through a grant by Pacific Source. Close to 50% of students were successful in quitting as a result of going through the SHS program.
  • Conducted a campus wide survey with assistance from College of Public Health and Human Science. All Corvallis and Cascades campus students, faculty and staff were invited to participate. For Corvallis, response rates were 30% of students and 41% of Faculty and Staff. The results of the survey will be presented in Fall 2013.
  • OSU became recognized as a "Gold Campus" through the Fresh Air Campus Challenge, a region-wide effort to forward smoke- and tobacco-free policies on college campuses. OSU is also a "mentor campus," providing support and assistance to other campuses.

Manage Stress

  • Working with CAPS (Salaheddine Ziadeh) and the lead instructors for the Bacc Core Class on Health and Wellness (HHS 231), a stress management currculum was put in place as one of the options for students to pursue.
  • HCI works closely with the Mental Health Initiatives in alighing the "Flourishing" objective with other healthy campus focus areas.
  • The MU Craft Center has become a core HCI partner to support art and creativity as a means of stress reduction.
  • There is an ongoing Stress Management counseling group at CAPS.
  • HCI provided support and funding for the Mind Spa expanison in Waldo Hall
  • HCI helped with funding for CAPS to bring Corey Keyes on campus for discussions and planning around his research on "flourishing."
  • HCI helped support the Mental Health Initiative and the Healthy Minds Study administered to students on campus in Spring 2013.

Mini-Grants

  • This year HCI gave our 14 mini-grants totaling $8,500. Groups involved and receiving funding were: Childcare and Familiy Resources, Counseling and Psychological Services, Veterans, Recreational Sports, Intercultural Student Services, Peer Health Advocates, ISOSU, ASOSU, Rainbow Continuum, Native American Student Association, Face AIDS, Pharmacy students, Men's Development and Engagement.
  • Recreational Sports is a key partner in the oversight and management of Mini-Grants.

Marketing and Communications

  • Be Well newletter has one of the highest "open" rates on campus, averaging 40% with 540 subscribers.
  • Working with University Relations and Marketing, a "message platform" has been created to consistently talk abuot health and wellness across campus.
  • The Be Well Communications group collaborated on putting a coupon book in the Res Halls for all new students and sharing messages across social media platforms.
  • HCI participated in START, CONNECT, Beaver Community Fair, National Nutrition Month, New Employee Orientations, University Day and Wellness Week.
  • Weekly "OSU Today" messages about health and wellness were provided spring term with positive feedback.
  • Be Well website was recreated.

Presentations

  • Lynn cordes and Tara Sanders (Chairs of the Healthy Eating Committee) were asked to present at the Oregon Higher Education Sustainability Conference on Fresh from the Faucet.
  • Lisa Hoogesteger and Stacey Edwards were a part of a panel presentation on "Smoke- and Tobacco-Free campuses" at the Oregon Public Health Association conference.
  • Amy Thomson and Lisa Hoogesteger presented on Spiritual Development at SALT in November 2012.
  • Lisa Hoogesteger and Amy Thomson presented at the NASPA conference on "Connecting Leaning Outcomes to Spiritual Deveopment."
  • Lisa Hoogesteger gave a Smoke-Free OSU update to OSU Faculty Senate in January 2013.
  • Lisa Hoogesteger presented to SALT in January 2013 on "Responding to community threats."
  • Tom Kirch presented to the National Intramural and Recrational Sports Association conference on the FUN project (physical activitiy for non-exercisers) and its follow up "Sharpe Up" program.

Other

  • Student Organization Summit: All student organizations with a connection to health and wellness were invited to a Summit in January and April. Representatives from nearly 30 different groups across campus attended and gave voice to ways they could support each other's goals. Both summits had very positive feedback and a request to continue the Summits as a way to intentionally build community and reinforce campuswiade work in health and wellness.
  • Spiritual Well-Being: Working collaboratively with the Spiritual Life at OSU group, "Spiritual Well-Being," as a part of CONNECT week activities. Also, this group developed and implemented a "Spiritual Wellness Week" during Fall Term. Pre- and post-event surveys were utilized to assess impact. Students reported that they participated to "learn about and connect with others" and to have "dialogue to increase appreciation of difference/diversity." 16 of 17 participants who completed both the pre- and post-test reported they had met people of different faiths/beliefs. (The intent of the conversations around Spiritual Well-Being was to connect these with the Learning Goals for Graduates; specifically "Pluralism and Cultural Legacies.")
  • In collaboration with Childcare and Family Resources, KidSpirit and Recreational Sports, a Women's Given Circle grant was proposed and accepted, providing nutrition and exercise opportunities for families to participate in and learn how to incorporate in daily living.
  • Healthy Campus as environmental and "culture of health and well-being" catalyst:
    • HHS 231, a BACC Core class focused on health and wellness, has redesigned their curriculum to include experiential learning for fitness, stress management and nutrition. This is a direct result of our focused task forces in each area.
    • PEBB will now provide rebates for regular exercisers at on-campus fitness facilities.

Video(s)

  • Stan the Plumber
  • Interview with Lindsey Reed for the Fun Project
  • Tobacco Cessation and Smoke Free Campus

Statistic Highlights

  • 700 Reusable water bottles distributed at the New Student Picnic
  • 10.4% Decrease in bottled Pepsi & water sales
  • 83% Increase in Beaver Strides registration
  • 2 Fruit and Veggie Flash mobs
  • $8,500 Provided in 14 HCI mini-grants

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/deanofstudents/hci

Email

Lisa.Hoog@oregonstate.edu

ASOSU Office of Advocacy Annual Report 2012-2013

ASOSU Office of Advocacy Banner

2013 Key Initiatives

  • The ASOSU Office of Advocacy successfully implemented a client questionnaire using Survey Monkey as a tool for gathering feedback from student clients about our services.
  • Created a presentation on Academic Dishonesty and presented to OSU INTO Students at the INTO American Survival Week.
  • Participated in the Beaver Fair at the MU Quad and Fall Enrichment day, both of these events were in collaboration with ASOSU Student Legal Services: Access the Law
  • Updated the student Intern Manual, which has served as a resource for new interns. It was edited in great detail and now contains updated information on office procedures.
  • Updated the intern guidebook, "Navigating through OSU Policies: An Intern's Guide" after three years. This guidebook contains information on OSU policies, important campus contacts, and tips for the interns related to the areas of assistance. The information is compiled by interns through online research.

What Worked

  • Welcomed the first PROMISE intern to work at the ASOSU Office of Advocacy; summer 2012.
  • The ASOSU Office of Advocacy became involved with the planning of the future office space in the Student Experience Center.
  • The office welcomed two new student hires, adding to the diversity of the student interns.
  • Updated the intake form, with the help of Rebecca Sanderson, to improve the quality of our data on students who seek help with the Office of Advocacy.

Areas That Need Improvement

  • The effectiveness of how the office collects feedback from student clients.
  • Reaching out to more areas on campus and sharing our mission and vision.

Statistics

These numbers track individual clients only. Multiple meetings with these clients are not recorded in the statistics for 2012-2013. Next year individual meetings will be tracked and included in the annual report.

Addressing students at various functions and presentations is also not recorded in the statistics. Since exact numbers of students are not known, we do not include these in our statistics.

Student Numbers

This is the breakdown of students by gender who used the ASOSU Office of Advocacy in fiscal year 2013. The data is listed in the following table.

Students Number Percentage
Male 83 43%
Female 89 46%
Trans 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Not Specified 20 10%
Total Responses 193

This image shows the breakdown of students who used the ASOSU Office of Advocacy in the 2012-2013 school year by class standing. The information is given in the following table.

Class Standing Number of Responses Percentage
Freshman 10 5%
Sophomore 27 15%
Junior 39 22%
Senior 58 32%
Post-Baccalaureate 1 1%
Graduate 16 9%
Not Specified 29 16
Total Responses 180

This image shows the different subject areas that students asked about. The information is listed in the following table.

Areas of Assistance Number of Requests
Academic Advising 35
Academic Dishonesty 35
ASOSU Advising 29
Campus OSP/Public Safety 0
Class Interview 4
Discrimination 4
Faculty Misconduct 9
Financial Aid 6
Grade Appeal 27
Internship Opportunity 0
INTO 3
UHDS/GEM 5
Parking 0
Residency 19
Student Conduct 15
Student Health Insurance 1
Tuition, Fees and Business 2
Other 9
Total Responses 203

This image shows the race & ethnicity breakdown of the students who used the ASOSU Office of Advocacy in the 2012-2013 school year. The information is listed in the table below.

Race & Ethnicity Number of Responses
American Indian/Alaskan Native 2
Asian, Asian American 53
Black, African American 1
East Indian 1
Hispanic, Hispanic American, Latino 7
Middle Eastern 20
Multiple Ethnicities 8
North African 2
White, Euro American 61
Other, None of the Above 1
Declined to Respond 15
Total Responses 171

This image shows the colleges represented by students who used the Office of Advocacy during the 2012-2013 academic year. The information is broken down in the following table.

Colleges Number of Responses
Agricultural Sciences 5
Business 15
Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences 1
Education 2
Engineering 44
Forestry 1
Graduate School 15
Liberal Arts 34
Pharmacy 0
Public Health & human Sciences 13
Science 15
University Honors College 0
Veterinary Medicine 0
INTO 16
University Exploratory Studies 1
International Programs 1
Unknown 15
Total Responses 178

This image shows the INTO program breakdown of students who used the ASOSU Office of advocacy in the 2012-2013 school year. The information is listed in the table below. This image shows more INTO program information for students who visited the ASOSU Office of Advocacy this year, and the information is laid out in the table below.

INTO Affiliation INTO Program Number of Responses
INTO OSU Academic English 1
General English 1
Conditional Admission Program 1
INTO Pathways
Undergraduate Business 1
Science 0
General 2
Engineering 3
Graduate Master of Business Administration 0
Master of Engineering 0
Total Responses 11

Quotes

Thank you so much again for all your legal, mental, and emotional support, and also for believing in me. You really do make a significantly positive impact on the students' live here at OSU, including mine. Your kindness will not be forgotten.

OSU Student

I needed her refreshing guidance and support to reinforce my rights to address the issue and take action.

OSU Student

I would not have reached my goal without Ms. Lacy. She saved my dream and thus my family's wellbeing.

OSU Student

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/asosu-advocacy/

Email

asosu.advocacy@oregonstate.edu

ASOSU Student Advocate Annual Report 2012-2013

ASOSU Student Advocate Banner

Check back next year for our 2014 Annual Report

About Us

Website

http://asosu.oregonstate.edu/student-advocate/

Email

student.advocate@oregonstate.edu

Human Services Resource Center Annual Report 2012-2013

Human Services Resource Center Banner

Our Mission

The Human Services Resource Center provides direct service, outreach, education, and referral services to Oregon State University students focused on alleviating the effects of hunger, poverty, and other human needs. HSRC creates a dynamic learning environment in which students, faculty, staff, and the community can learn how to meet the current societal challenges facing college students.

Goals

OSU Students will have the ability to pursue higher education without the hindrance of hunger, poverty, and other related human needs.

  • All OSU students have the right to respect, dignity, and compassion.
  • All OSU students should have access to resources that meet human needs, and access to resources beyond the classroom that will help students focus their participation in the educational experience.
  • Engaging students in leadership, professional development and practicum opportunities produce a higher caliber graduate ready to meet the multifaceted challenges facing society.

Assessment

HSRC's learning outcomes for students working in the office are:

  • Gain professional and administrative skills through immersion in a functional office environment.
  • Develop a sense of understanding of poverty as a cross-cutting diversity issue with its own unique set of student experiences, culture, and outcomes.
  • Increase critical thinking and problem-solving skills through individual and team responsibilities.
  • Practice multiple forms of communication through presenting, writing, networking, and providing peer-to-peer assistance

Staff working in HSRC gain real-world experience through participation in a functional office setting. Each staff member does a self-assessment prior to the start of work, including a goal-setting activity that is share with the team and HSRC Coordinator. Throughout the year the goals are re-assessed and evaluated. HSRC staff participate in in-service trainings focused on but not limited to, communication skills, multicultural competency, career evaluation and goals, human services, and supporting others in crisis.

  • 100% of staff members leaving HSRC reported increases in: gains in professional skills, eveloping a greater sense of poverty and its impats, critical-thinking skills, and the ability to communicate effectively with individuals different from themselves.
  • Student staffer Holly Rawlings developed the presentation, "So you want to start a campus food pantry?" Presented at the NASPA Region V conference along with Clare Cady.
  • HSRC was host site to two undergraduate interns, one graduate intern, and one intern from the workforce preparation program.
  • HSRC developed a training "menu" ranging from five minute info drive-bys to half- and full-day immersion trainings on HSRC, student poverty, and other issues regarding class/socioeconomic status/economic issues.

Education and Outreach

  • HSRC student staff increased outreach hours by 30%.
  • HSRC developed and implemented two annual events to be replicated in the 2013-2014 school year.
  • HSRC established two new off-campus partnerships through an MOU with the Linn-Benton Food Share, joining the Corvallis Food Security Workgroup through the United Way, and offering an on campus SNAP application program with the Department of Human Services.
  • HSRC created a presentation and training "menu" focused on providing tailored outreach and education regarding issues of poverty, hunger, homelessness, and food insecurity.
  • HSRC partnered with Michigan State University to found the College and University Food Bank Alliance, (CUFBA), connecting campus-based food banks and pantries in a national digital community.

Accomplishments

  • HSRC was chosen as a host site for an AmeriCorps VISTA member for the 2013-2014 academic year.
  • HSRC Coordinator, Clare Cady, published the article Discussing Poverty as a Student issue: Making a Case for Student Human Services in the Journal of College and Character, in August 2012.
  • HSRC partnered with UHDS to put on "Iron Chef McNary," a friendly cooking competition aimed at raising awareness around food insecurity as a campus and community issue.
  • HSRC deepened the partnership with Childcare & Family Resources and Veterans' Resources, creating the SR3 team.

Statistic Highlights

  • 188 Volunteers
  • 980 Volunteer Hours
  • 1,083 Households served at the Food Pantry
  • 2,583 Clients served at the Food Pantry
  • $11,830 Donations Raised
  • $200,000 Awarded in Student Assistance

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/hsrc/

Email

hsrc@oregonstate.edu

New Student Programs and Family Outreach Annual Report 2012-2013

New Student Programs and Family Outreach Banner

Mission

New Student Programs & Family Outreach serves as a campus leader in facilitating the transition process for new students and their parent/family members. We promote and enhance successful transitions through collaborative programs and outreach.

Goals

  • Support student growth and development throughout their first year at OSU.
  • Provide new students and their families with informative and engaging orientations and first year programming.
  • Support specific transitional resources for unique student populations (e.g. Veterans, international students, Degree Partnership Program students, transfer students, multicultural students, non-traditional students, first-generation students).
  • Familiarize students with the campus and community.
  • Develop supportive partnerships with parents and family members of new students.
  • Provide meaningful student employment and internship opportunities for current OSU students.

Assessment

  • NSPFO has re-instated term orientation sessions. This past year, winter and spring term orientations were offered for students starting at OSU mid-year. 486 newly admitted students attended term orientations where they received generaly education information, campus resource information, met with advisors and registered for classes. NSPFO collaborated with advising offices across campus to ensure students beginning at OSU mid-year were supported in their transition process.
  • NSPFO collaborated closely with the International Orientation Team to produce a more consistent message and experience for incoming degree seeking undergraduate students. The Online Orientation program for International Students was a focus this year. NSPFO staff made, in partnership with academic colleges, made significant upgrades this year to the information provided via this online program.
  • During Fall 2012 a new CONNECT schedule was launched, which reduced CONNECT from 8 days to 4 days and overall received positive feedback from the OSU community about this change. As a part of this new schedule, NSPFO hosted a "New Student Scholar Symposium" that focused on success in the classroom and had 350 new incoming first year students in attendance.
  • NSPFO staff collaborated with the Center for Teaching and Learning to facilitate 2 lunch workshops and 1 2-day workshop to enhance teaching for first-year students with approximately 70 total participants across all 3 events.
  • NSPFO is home to the Parent & Family Association (PFA), with approximately 600 members. PFA members received enhanced communication through a monthly e-newsletter, a welcome letter, a wall calendar, and one mix & mingle event per year.
  • NSPFO staff and graduate students maintain involvement in a variety of professional development activities at both a regional and national level.

Program Highlights

START

OSU START is a summer orientation, advising and registration program. Programs are offered in June, July, August, and September. START gives new students an opportunity to come to campus, attend academic presentations, take placement tests, meet other new and current students, stay in the residence halls and register for fall term classes. Off-site START programs are also offered in Alaska, California and Hawaii. START Bilingüe is offered once a year and is a Spanish-speaking track for bilingual parents/families of new students.

START Total Attendance

Year Students Family Total
2011 5,036 2,880 7,916
2012 5,170 3,368 8,538
2013 5,513 3,603 9,116

Percent of students that agreed or strongly agreed with the statement: The overall organization and content of START was helpful in preparing me to attend Oregon State University.

  • 97% First Year Students (+6% from last year)
  • 92% Transfer Students (+2% from last year)

Percent of students that agreed or strongly agreed with the statement: I feel prepared to attend OSU in the fall

  • 97% First Year Students (+2% from last year)
  • 95% Transfer Students

According to student START participants, the 3 most important things they learned at START were:

START Learning Outcomes
First Year Students Advising/Registration Navigating Campus/Locations Involvement
Transfer Students Advising/Registration Navigating Campus/Locations Resources available

U-Engage

U-Engage is a 2-credit course designed to help students investigate an academic area of interest. In a smaller class environment, new students explore a particular academic area of interest together. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of campus resources and explore the tips & habits of highly successful students.

In Fall 2013, 34 sections of U-Engage are offered. As of the beginning of fall term, 834 students were enrolled in a U-Engage class.

Assessment from Fall 2012 shows the average Fall term GPA for U-Engage students was a 3.06-GPA compared to a 2.93 GPA for non-U-Engage students.

96.2% of U-Engage students registered as full time in Winter 2013 compared with 95% fr non-U-Engage students.

Statistic Highlights

  • 486 Students attended term orientations
  • 70 Participants in First-Year Teaching Workshops
  • 9,116 Attendees at START 2013

Quotes

I really enjoyed my time at START, and I feel prepared to start the next chapter of my life at OSU in the Fall!

First Year Student

It was a great program. It really got me excited to start attending OSU. I was actually scared and nervous before the START program. Everyone was so nice and willing to help me learn the campus layout and talk to me about themselves. Even the students in my degree were nice! That was something I didn't expect.

Transfer Student

This was invaluable for me. I have an older daughter in college out of state so this wasn't my first exposure. This was really informative, helpful, organized and well done. It wasn't stressed in the START info that my daughter reviewed that parents SHOULD attend, it was implied that they could come. Thank you very much for all your efforts. It was really beneficial. :)

Parents

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/newstudents

Email

newstudents@oregonstate.edu

Student Conduct and Community Standards Annual Report 2012-2013

Student Conduct and Community Standards Banner

Check back next year for our 2014 Annual Report

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/studentconduct

Email

SCCS@oregonstate.edu

Student Care Annual Report 2012-2013

Student Care Team Banner

Student Care Team

The Student Care Team (SCT) at Oregon State University was developed as a result of growing safety issues and concerns on college campuses. The SCT addresses student behaviors that are disruptive and may include safety and/or mental health issues. The goal of the SCT is to promote the safety and health of students which, in turn, aids in the well-being of our overall OSU community. The SCT consists of a group of qualified and dedicated OSU professionals who collaborate together as they focus on:

  • Eliminating "fragmented care" and information
  • Providing a structured method for addressing student behaviors that impact the university community
  • Balancing the individual needs of the student and those of the greater campus community
  • Initiating appropriate intervention without resorting to punitive measures

The Student Care Team is comprised of representative from the Academic Success Center, Counseling and Psychological Services, Dean of Student Life Office, Department of Public Safety, International Student Advising, INTO OSU, Oregon State Police – OSU Station, Residential Education, Student Conduct and Community Standards, and Student Health Services. The Student Care Team meets regularly and serves campus with consultations regarding students of concern and presentations for managing disruptive student behaviors.

In 2013 the Student Care Team

  1. Expanded its web presence.
  2. Revamped and boradened its campus distribution of an OSU-specific printed folder and inserts titled "Resources for Consultation and Referral."
    • Presentations are given when resource folders are distributed. Examples of distribution from January 2013-present are: Council of Head Advisors, New Academic Advisor Orientation, Departmental meetings, Culture Center Student Leader training, Student Life Assistance Team, Student Affairs Leadership Team.
  3. Provided customized presentations to campus on the topic of "Responding to Distressed and Disruptive Student Behaviors
    • Presentation was given to NROTC leadership in 2013. This was the first time a ROTC unit asked for this presentation.
    • Two SCT representatives traveled to the OSU Cascades campus to present to all faculty/professional faculty on "Working with Distressed & Disruptive Students" in September of 2013.

Student Life Assistance Team

The Student Life Assistance Team (SLAssistance) at Oregon State University was developed in response to the mounting needs of our increasing student population. Students, their families, OSU staff, academic advisors, and faculty are increasingly requesting assistance navigating the non-academic student issues they may encounter. Many students face difficult times during college; unexpected life events, personal crises, mental health struggles, academic difficulties are examples of challenges that can interfere with college success and often faculty, staff, and advisors benefit from consultation with and support of the SL Assistance Team. SL Assistance is designed to help faculty, staff, and advisors:

  • Verify situation-applicable Oregon State University policies and procedures
  • Access referrals for non-academic student matters/emergencies
  • Navigate processes for resolving concerns and grievances

Student Life assistance is a service in the Office of the Dean of Student Life delivered by a group of OSU professionals who meet bi-weekly for professional development to ensure the application of best practices and reliable assistance competencies. This team solves low to moderate level problems as a service to students, families and faculty/staff via phone, email and walk-in's.

In 2013 the Student Life Assistance Team

  1. Published web pages to separately describe services for students, families, and faculty/staff/advisors
  2. Researched, developed, and adopted guidelines for practice to ensure consistency in delivery of information and for making referrals for positive outcomes. Guidelines were distributed to all Assistance Team members to ensure consistency in practice.
  3. Improved its delivery of service with the installation of an automated telephone attendant.
  4. Since January 2013, three new team members have been trained and added to service.
  5. A Blackboard Community was developed for Assistance Team members. It is a depository for information and training resources.
  6. Data gathering systems were put into place to capture information for future assessment purposes.

Attachment

Student Care Team Resource GuideResource Guide

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/deanofstudents

Email

deanofstudents@oregonstate.edu

Veteran's Information Annual Report 2012-2013

Veterans Information Office Banner

Our Mission

Veterans Resources helps student veterans successfully navigate the Oregon State University structure while accomplishing their education goals and maximizing their VA benefits.

Commencement photo with Veterans Information staff and students

Student Veterans and Veterans Information staff at Commencement 2013

Assessment

Goal – Student Veteran Outreach:

  • OSU Veterans Workgroup members conducted 8 First Year and 5 Transfer START Sessions providing 76 student veterans with information on VA education benefits and school related information.
  • The VFSA, ASOSU Veterans Taskforce Director, and the Veterans Resources Coordinator partnered together to provide 2 outreach events during Veterans Week 2013; November 12, 2013 Federal and State VA Resource Day in the Veterans Lounge and November 17, 2013 Football Game Honoring Veterans and Service-Members.

Goal - Communication with the OSU Community:

  • Development of the Veterans Newsletter for Staff and Students by the Veteran Resources Coordinator. Eventual placement of the newsletter on the OSU Veterans Website.
  • Development and implementation of the OSU Facility Advisor FAQ on the OSU Veterans Website.
  • Participation in local community Veterans Connections meetings and events.

Note left at Veterans Information on Memorial Day, reads Hey Veterans, I want to personally thank each and every one of you for serving for our country and defending us. You put yourselves into danger for the greater good, and I am eternally grateful that there are individuals like yourselves that think of others before themselves. Your service has not gone unnoticed. Best, UGO UBA

Memorial Day note from an OSU student

Program Highlights

  • The VA Certifying Officials certified 1484 (certified a minimum of one time throughout the duration of the academic year) during the 2012-2013 academic school year. Current 2013 Fall Term enrollment is 950 Student Veterans.
  • The Veteran Resources Coordinator made 2039 (774 phone calls, 1120 emails, and 145 in person interviews) contacts with Student Veterans.
  • Presentation of the newly created OSU Veterans and Service Member Challenge Coin in honor of their service and work for the veteran community to the following individuals; Major General Jeff Buchanan, Major General Julie Bentz, President Ed Ray, two WWII veterans, and other OSU Alumni Veterans and dignitaries.
  • Two Student Veterans were acknowledged for their role on campus as veteran advocates:
    • Julie Stewart, Associated Students of Oregon State University (ASOSU) Veteran Task-Force Director, was selected for the 2013 Women's Center Student Award.
    • Kyle Hatch, Veteran and Family Student Association (VFSA) Treasurer and Omega Delta Sigma President, was nominated for the 2013 Memorial Union E.C. Allworth Leadership Award.
  • One Student Veteran, Maria Ballard, was featured as a Human Interest Story during the 2013 Commencement ceremonies.

Accomplishments

  • In coordination with the Veterans Workgroups and Advisory Committee, the Veteran Resources Coordinator developed and hosted several Military and Veteran Culture Awareness trainings/presentations:
    1. October 3, 2012 - Triad Faculty and Staff Meeting
    2. November 1, 2012 - Oregon Association of Higher Education and Disability Conference
    3. February 7, 2013 - Oregon Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
    4. March 5, 2013 - NASPA Conference, Co-Presented with Student Resources 3 (SR3) team members (HSRC and CFR), "Overlapping Identities: Teamwork to Meet Convergent Student Needs."
    5. June 4, 2013 - Memorial Union Leadership Inclusive Presentation
  • The VFSA, ASOSU Veterans Taskforce Director, and the Veteran Resources Coordinator collaborated with several departments across the university to offer four showings of the "Invisible War" documentary. The April 10, 2013 showing hosted one of the individuals from the documentary, Myla Haider.
  • The OSU Veterans Workgroup developed and hosted two training sessions in April to help fulfill Aspiration Number 2 from the 2012 Annual Report, "Work with the workgroup to identify a more productive manner to translate and utilize military education."
  • The Veteran Resources Coordinator partnered with a graduate student in the Masters of Public Health, federal and state VA providers, and Healthy Campus Initiatives to present the first annual Staff Veterans Resource Day on April 9, 2013. Thus fulfilling Aspiration Number 3 from the 2012 Annual Report, "Facilitate communication with Staff Connections program participants about the OSU veteran population by putting on a veterans resources fair for staff during winter or spring term of 2013."
  • Through cooperation with Enrollment Management Offices, OSU Veterans Workgroup and Advisory Committee, and the university President's office, 115 students receiving Military Tuition Assistance benefits were allowed to continue using Tuition Assistance at OSU due to the signing of the Department of Defense Memorandum of Understanding.
  • Approval of the use and wear of the Veteran and U.S. Military Service Recognition Cord for the 2013 and future commencement ceremonies.
  • Creation of the Student Health Services Veterans Workgroup Fall of 2012

Memorial day remembrance at the MU

Memorial Day Remembrance

Aspirations

  1. Help veterans with the transition from military culture and environment to Oregon State University by creating a Veterans Transition Course.
  2. Create and launch the Veterans OSU Blog site replacing the Veterans Newsletter.
  3. Create and fund a student position within the Veterans Lounge

Additional Highlights

  • 1484 Student Veterans certified for VA Education Benefits (2011-2012)
  • 13 START Sessions conducted by OSU Veterans Workgroup Members
  • 2039 Contacts Made with Student Veterans
  • 35 Veteran/Military Culture Outreaches & Trainings Conducted

About Us

Website

http://oregonstate.edu/veterans

Email

Veterans@oregonstate.edu

Annual Report 2012

Student Life Annual Report Chart Graphic

Student Life Offices
Office of the Dean of Student Life Report Career Services Report Childcare and Family Resources Report Disability Access Services Report
Healthy Campus Initiative Report Committed to an Enriching and Healthy Student Experience providing pathways to learning and positive self-discovery Human Services Resource Center Report
New Student Programs and Family Outreach Report Student Conduct and Community Standards Student, Family and Community Support Report Veterans Information Report

ODOSL Annual Report 2011-2012

Office of the Dean of Student Life Banner

Our Mission

Our mission is to provide educational and developmental opportunities for students to make informed decisions that support their success at Oregon State University. We are dedicated to providing an environment that will enable students to effectively engage in their academic and intellectual work.

Program Highlights

  • NASPA Undergraduate Fellows Program (NUFP)
    The NASPA Undergraduate Fellows program is a semi-structured mentoring program for undergraduate students wishing to explore and better understand the field of student affairs and/or higher education. The mission of the NASPA Undergraduate Fellows Program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented professionals in student affairs, including but not limited to those of racial and ethnic-minority background; those having a disability; and those identifying as LGBTQ.
    The Oregon State University NUFP program has almost doubled since last year, with 23 mentees. University Housing and Dining Services provided support for room and board for NUFP summer interns.
  • Interfaith and Community Service (IFCS)
    Spiritual Life @ OSU will help support efforts related to interfaith engagement over the course of the next academic year, as a stronger tie has been formed between different groups and administrative bodies. We are also in the process of completing assessment work with respect to attitudes and experiences from the "Service Meets Spirit" conference. Thus far, we've concluded that individuals are eager to continue conversation with respect to the subject of personal beliefs and that the community is, by and large, spiritually malnourished. A new graduate assistant has been appointed for the next two academic years in the Office of the Dean of Student Life, which has oversight responsibilities for the IFCS initiative. There is also discussion of having this effort transition from an administrative effort to a recognized student organization.
    Participating organizations: Muslim Student Association, Newman Center, United Campus Ministry at Westminster House, Baha'i Student Association, Luther House, Latter-day Saint Student Association, Advocates for Freethought and Skepticism, Hillel at OSU, CRU (formerly known as Campus Crusade for Christ), Friends of the Family, Center for Civic Engagement, Healthy Campus Initiatives, Office of the Dean of Student Life, Memorial Union Program Council, Human Services Resource Center, Spiritual Life @ OSU, Linn;Benton Food Share, Stone Soup Kitchen, University Housing and Dining Services / Orchard Court Family Housing, OSU Veteran Services, Division Student Affairs, Associated Students of Oregon State University, and Students in Free Enterprise.
  • Everyone Matters @ OSU
    The Everyone Matters campaign is a six-month global social media campaign to foster inclusiveness and reduce intolerance. Faculty, staff, administrators, and students are encouraged to participate in the campaign by:
    • Inviting students (or faculty) to upload a 15-second video from smartphone or webcam sharing experience of being misjudged—or misjudging!— or how they learned to be more inclusive, stronger, or wiser;
    • Taking the 24-Hour Challenge to "Not Judge in Thought or Action" for a whole day—and inviting your class, student organization, or department to take the 24-Hour challenge; Inviting your class, student organization or department to submit videos as a group classroom project, themed to pride of identity, being judged, judging others or related topic. (With the help of Everyone Matters staff, you can quickly and easily create a video page on Tout for your institution or course to upload the videos to a single page, with your institution's name and logo. It's simple and easy to do.)
    • Contacting Everyone Matters staff and collaborating with innovative ideas for community involvement, classroom projects or to involve your students.
  • Religious Accommodation Policy for Students
    In September of 2011, The Associate Dean of Student Life invited colleagues to participate on a committee to discuss the possibility of developing a religious accommodation policy to address faculty and students' questions related to providing accommodations on the basis of students' sincerely held religious beliefs. The committee met several time throughout the academic year and produced the Religious Accommodation for Student Policy on May 17, 2012. The formal policy can be found at http://oregonstate.edu/oei/religious-discrimination
    The development of the Religious Accommodation Policy for Students was a collaborative effort of the Office of General Counsel, the Office of the Dean of Student Life, the Office of Equity and Inclusion and OSU Religious Advisors.

 

Video(s)

Introduction to Dean of Student Life

I am an OSU NUFP!

OSU NUFP Video

Career Services Annual Report 2011-2012

Under Construction

Our Mission

To empower, support, and nurture OSU students and alumni in their exploration and pursuit of lifelong career success and meaningful employment in a diverse world.

Goals

  • Educate students, alumni, and the OSU campus communities on the lifelong nature of career development, the process of gaining occupational self-awareness, and developing skills and strategies for identifying and securing meaningful employment.
  • Empower students to engage in experiential opportunities, employment, and networking that will help them reach their professional goals, and challenge them to become global and productive citizens.
  • Develop and maintain relationships with alumni, employers, the OSU campuses, and global communities in order to support and provide professionally significant opportunities for OSU students and alumni.

Assessment

Building Bridges

The "Building Bridges" event was revised to cultivate partnerships with CAMP, EOP and ISS and better serve the needs of their students. We collectively agreed that a customized or individualized approach would be more effective than a single large group event for both students and employers. After assessing their needs, we realized that first year CAMP, EOP and Graduate International students have different career development needs and goals. As a result we re-evaluated and decided to focus on delivering customized services. Here are some examples of services provided to address the unique needs of these groups:

  • Served as consultants to facilitate more appropriate career development programming:

    1. Provided information about Dining Etiquette training available to CAMP students with a campus expert.
    2. Provided education to employers about the benefits of hiring international students and what they should know about hiring international students.
    3. Educated and encouraged employers to be more inclusive to international students by posting internships on Beaver JobNet.
  • Increased outreach efforts to promote career development to culturally diverse groups and centers on campus.
  • Provided Career Exploration presentation to 1st year CAMP students in mandatory class Spring Term.
  • Conducted mock interviews and presented workshops on resume development, career exploration, and cultural competency workshops to INTO students.
  • Delivered customized workshop for the Cross-Cultural Mentoring Program on cultural competency and career development to mentors and mentees, which includes faculty, staff and domestic minority and international students.
  • Informed and established on-going communication about upcoming Career Development workshops and events to EOP

Program Highlights

  • INTO Program: Conducted mock interviews and presented workshops on resume development, career exploration, and cultural competency workshops to INTO students to enhance career development.
  • Cross-Cultural Mentoring Program: Delivered customized workshop on cultural competency and career development to mentors and mentees, representing faculty, staff and domestic minority and international students.
  • Nonprofit and Volunteering Expo: Boasted an increase to 60 (up 10%) and employer participants and 325 (up 7%) student visitors.
  • Experiential Learning: 50% of graduating senior respondents in the OSU Senior Survey engaged in experiential learning (internships) while completing their education at OSU.

Accomplishments

  • Outreach Presentations: In 2011-2012, 119 presentations serving 3,349 students were delivered.
  • Social Media: 1,328 Facebook fans where we post career related articles, jobs/internships, highlight opportunities on campus and the community to get involved, and do contests where fans can win gift certificates to eateries on campus by engaging on our page. We introduced and presented a new workshop three times this year with 34 students attending and 2 employers presenting: "Using Social Media to Get a Job" which was well received and requested by many instructors due to the explosion of social media and new ways to use this tool. Counselors and advisors also are using LinkedIn and teaching students how to use it as part of the job search and to network and make connections.

Video(s)

  • Oregon State Alum Justin Molter Talks About What It's Like to Intern for the Portland Trailblazers

Childcare and Family Resources Annual Report 2011-2012

Our Mission

The Childcare and Family Resources office supports parents at OSU by advocating for student parent needs as well as the needs of all parents and caregivers on campus and by providing direct services, child care and other family centered resources in support of a parent's academic and professional success.

Program Highlights

  • Continued funding of free drop-off child care for student parents, one of the first university programs of its kind in the nation
  • Highest use to date of our free drop-off child care service – on average served 76 student parents per term
  • Continued and increased student-fee funding for child care subsidies ($65,000 dispersed) demonstrating ongoing commitment of OSU students toward the support of student parents
  • Administered the FriendRaisers Faculty/Staff child care subsidy, serving 9 families with a total disbursement of $12,500
  • Served nearly 30 mothers, both students and faculty/staff, through our network of lactation rooms – nearly 3x the use from the previous year
  • Wrap around services for student families receiving services through HSRC, VA and CFR

Accomplishments

  • Bring Your Kids to Campus Day, a campus wide event which drew 106 University parents and their children to share in the experience of family friendly activities focusing on healthy eating and physical exercise.
  • Joy Drive – Due to the generosity of 30 departments/individuals/alumni from across campus, 33 student parents received wrapped gifts for their children and/or family during the holiday season
  • Through OLV/Library drop-off child care, provided students the opportunity for paid employment in an area directly related to their interests and academic program; an opportunity to gain hands on, professional experience in a child care setting
  • Partnered with the Recreational Sports staff around the planning and development of a second Our Little Village site at the Dixon Recreation Center

Statistic

  • OSU Student FAFSA Filer with Children (2000 - 2012)

    OSU Student FAFSA Filer with Children

  • Graduate Student as a % of Applicant Pool (2007 - 2012)

    Graduate Student as a % of Applicant Pool

  • International Students as a % of the Child Subsidy Applicant Pool (2007 - 2012)

    International Student as a % of the Child Subsidy Applicant Pool

Disability Access Services Annual Report 2011-2012

Our Mission

Disability Access Services (DAS) facilitates access to University programs and services for students, faculty, staff and visitors with disabilities through accommodations, education, consultation, and advocacy.

Goals

  • Provide effective accommodations for students with disabilities based on law and current best practices.
  • Educate the campus community about disability issues.
  • Positively influence decision-making and practices to include Universal Design principles. (Universal design is the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design).
  • Promote self-determination for individuals with disabilities.

Assessment

Working in DAS – What are the Benefits?

Student employees within Disability Access Services will be able to articulate the policies of DAS for student employees and demonstrate the skills necessary for their position(s) (i.e: assisting at the front desk, Notetaking, Alternative Testing, Alternative Formats, and/or Captioning) in DAS. Based on the results of student employee exit interviews, employees are reporting a significantly higher level of learning on the domains created by the Student Affairs Assessment Council than when first measured in 2003. A full report can be viewed on the Assessment Plan/Report for 2012-13.

Attachments:

Program Highlights

  • Implemented a Real Time Visibility Solution using AeroScout hardware/software to track accessible furniture and improve the student experience utilizing ADA compliant furniture as an accommodation at Oregon State University. The RLTS tracks furniture using AeroScout's Wi-Fi-based Active RFID tags and our wireless network. We are currently tracking over 450 assets in over 400 different classrooms.
  • Implemented the ADA Parking Monitoring System to increase utilization and improve monitoring of ADA parking on campus. For this project, small sensors will be installed in a selection of ADA parking spaces on campus. The sensors will be connected to a network of repeaters which allows real time monitoring and data collection. The utilization data gathered will assist OSU's Transportation and Parking Services and DAS to develop programs and report on ADA parking utilization. The network system also has a smart phone and iPad app that will show real time ADA parking availability to students, visitors, faculty, and staff. This project is a pilot project and will only cover a subset of ADA parking on campus, but if it is successful, it may be expanded to cover all ADA parking on campus in the future.
  • DAS collaborated with OSU Valley Library and Sorenson VRI to provide free remote relay service and hardware for deaf and hard of hearing students or staff. OSU Valley Library was generous in providing location and resources (i.e. internet access) for this service.
  • DAS Testing Center has been consolidated and relocated to Heckart Lodge in January 2012. In this facility allows DAS to administer more than 3000 exams last years.

Accomplishments

  • A survey of faculty was completed in Spring 2012; based on faculty requests, the results will be used to create an online, self-paced tutorial for faculty.

Video(s)

  • Student Employee Interview with Michele Bromley

Statistic

  • Number of Accommodation Requests

    Description FY 2012 2012 vs.
    2010
    FY 2011 FY 2010
    Total Accommodation Requests 4865 49.78% 3900 3248
    Number of Classes with Accommodations 2928 40.84% 2446 2079
    Alternative Formats - Total Requests 889 29.97% 822 684
    Alternative Formats - Number of Classes 766 29.17% 703 593
    Alternative Testing - Total Exam Requests 3333 40.69% 2572 2369
    Deaf and Hard of Hearing - Total Requests 215 7.50% 211 200
    Deaf and Hard of Hearing - Video Processed (Minutes) 7769 157.08% 3022 N/A
    Notetaking Services - Total Requests 2487 38.78% 2017 1792
    Notetaking Services - Number of Classes 1272 15.85% 1192 1098
    Notetaking Services - Number Invoices Generated 975 25.97% 855 774
  • Number of Students (2007 - 2012)

    In fiscal year 2007, 597 students were served by Disability Access Services. In 2008, 636 students received services. In 2009, 609 students were served. In 2010, 646 students were served, and in 2011, 739 students received services from D.A.S. In 2012, D.A.S. provided services for 780 students.

  • Number of Accommodation Requests (2007 - 2012)

    In fiscal year 2007, 2,883 accommodations were requested by OSU students. There were 2,888 accommodation requests in 2008, and 2,869 in 2009. In 2010, accommodation requests rose to 3,248, and then to 3,900 in 2011. In 2012, OSU Disability Access Services received 4,865 requests for accommodations.

Healthy Campus Initiative Annual Report 2011-2012

Our Mission

To promote health and well-being for students, faculty, and staff at OSU. Through collective action and input from the OSU community, we identify health priorities and advocate for policies, services, and environments that systemically support health and wellness.

Goals (Vision)

By emphasizing a culture of well-being, we support individuals and our community in adopting and maintaining healthy behaviors to improve quality of life. A healthy campus provides added value, beyond what individuals provide for themselves. The Oregon State University campus will be known around the world for cultivating an environment so infused with well-being that it requires conscious effort to "opt-out" of positive health choices.

  • A campus environment that fosters health and well-being for all community members to learn, grow, and achieve. Campaigns in four areas: Be Active, Eat Well, Manage Stress, Smoke-free
  • Be Active Goals: Promote and enhance physical activities/resources, programs and events; Create awareness and positive behavioral changes in the area of physical activity; Increase the proportion of OSU students, faculty and staff meeting physical activity guidelines as set by the American College of Sports Medicine.
  • Eat Well Goals: Encourage members of the OSU community to eat more fruits and vegetables and choose water over sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Manage Stress Goals: Reduce the percentage of students whose academics are negatively affected by: Stress, Anxiety, Sleep Disorders, Colds and flu and Work.
  • Smoke-free Goals: Support a Smoke-free environment at OSU through campus No Smoking policy and Nicotine Replacement Therapy

Program Highlights

Healthy Campus Initiatives (HCI) coordinated effective collaboration involving academic, student affairs and service units around the promotion of basic health improvement initiatives for the campus population as a whole raising access and awareness to healthier food at campus events, physical activity opportunities for staff and faculty, smoking cessation programs for staff, faculty and students, abundant supplies of fresh drinking water for the campus and encouragement and support to include fruits and vegetables in daily diets.

Accomplishments

  • Smoke-free OSU became a smoke free campus effective September 1, 2012 through the development of an Oregon Administrative rule ending smoking on the OSU campus. http://oregonstate.edu/smokefree/sites/default/files/docs/smokefree_oar.pdf

    The smoking cessation program through Student Health Services is free to students. Faculty and staff pay $20 the first visit with follow-up visits only $10. Participants can get free nicotine gum or patches in support of their decision to quit. Leadership for Smoke-Free implementation came from Student Health Services with support from the OSU community.

    The survey was emailed to 74 students, and 43 students were contacted by phone. Of the 117 students contacted, 21.6% were female and 78.4% were male. Thirty four surveys were collected with a response rate of 29%. Individuals that identified as male represented 88% of the total respondents with females underrepresented at 12%.

    Among all respondents, 29.4% reported as a result of their participation in the program being able to stop tobacco use, 32.4% reported temporarily stopping tobacco use, 29.4%reported cutting back on tobacco use, and only 8.8% reported making no change in their tobacco use.

    View the full report: Nicotine Replacement Therapy

  • Created and distributed a wellness survey to OSU faculty and staff. Forty-four percent responded to the survey.
  • Be Active: Beaver Strides Pedometer program designed to get faculty, staff and students moving. Pacific Source funds covered equipment, marketing and incentive costs. Direct promotion to 3,428 individuals resulted in 432 enrolling and 312 reporting having met program activity goals.
  • FUN Project Free fitness memberships and classes to 241employees who were motivated to begin physical activity. The project received support of President Ed Ray, other high level administrators and the Office of Human Resources. At the end of the term 70% of participants reported continuing to be physically active.
  • Eat Well: Fruit and Vegetable Subsidies Using PacificSource funds, HCI provided OSU catering services a 20% subsidy on fruit and vegetable trays for on-campus events. With tray prices comparable to less nutritious offerings, fruit and vegetable sales increased 90% over the previous year when the subsidy was not offered.
  • Fresh From the Faucet Facilities Services and Campus Recycling worked with HCI to provide additional water bottle fill stations, a station location map and signage. In 2011-12 sugared beverage sales on campus decreased substantially and water consumption appeared to be up. A few centrally located water fill stations were metered and showed significant gains in usage over the two year period.

Video(s)

  • Stan the Plumber

  • Interview with Lindsey Reed for the Fun Project

  • Tobacco Cessation and Smoke Free Campus

Human Services Resource Center Annual Report 2011-2012

Our Mission

The Human Services Resource Center provides direct service, outreach, education, and referral services to Oregon State University students focused on alleviating the effects of hunger, poverty, and other human needs. HSRC creates a dynamic learning environment in which students, faculty, staff, and the community can learn how to meet the current societal challenges facing college students.

Goals

OSU Students will have the ability to pursue higher education without the hindrance of hunger, poverty, and other related human needs.

  • All OSU students have the right to respect, dignity, and compassion.
  • All OSU students should have access to resources that meet human needs, and access to resources beyond the classroom that will help students focus their participation in the educational experience.
  • Engaging students in leadership, professional development and practicum opportunities produce a higher caliber graduate ready to meet the multifaceted challenges facing society.

Assessment

HSRC's learning outcomes for students working in the office are:

  • Gain professional and administrative skills through immersion in a functional office environment.
  • Develop a sense of understanding of poverty as a cross-cutting diversity issue with its own unique set of student experiences, culture, and outcomes.
  • Increase critical thinking and problem-solving skills through individual and team responsibilities.
  • Practice multiple forms of communication through presenting, writing, networking, and providing peer-to-peer assistance

Staff working in HSRC gain real-world experience through participation in a functional office setting. Each staff member does a self-assessment prior to the start of work, including a goal-setting activity that is share with the team and HSRC Coordinator. Throughout the year the goals are re-assessed and evaluated. HSRC staff participate in in-service trainings focused on but not limited to, communication skills, multicultural competency, career evaluation and goals, human services, and supporting others in crisis.

Education and Outreach

  • HSRC partnered with the Center for Civic Engagement to put on the "Faces of Homelessness" event for Homelessness Awareness Month.
  • The Outreach Team gave presentations to: Student Health Advisory Board, Financial Aid, Counseling and Psychological Services, Women's Center Staff, and the Interfaith Community Service Program
  • The HSRC Coordinator, Clare Cady, served as keynote speaker at the Leadership Corvallis Human Services Day
  • The HSRC Coordinator, Clare Cady, presented on "Serving College Students in Poverty" at the NASPA National Conference, the C.A.R.E. Diversity Summit, and the Anthropology Department Tan Sack Lunch Series
  • The External Coordinator, Tim Daniel, facilitated a discussion on faith-based approaches to alleviating poverty at the IFCS "Service Meets Spirit" Conference in April
  • HSRC Outreach Staff tabled at START, CONNECT, the BeWell 5k Run, and National Nutrition Awareness Week

Community and Diversity

  • HSRC participated in the creation of, and was included in, the Benton County 2.1.1. service launch
  • HSRC partnered with UHDS working on getting food stamps accepted at Cascade Market
  • HSRC forged new partnerships with the Childcare and Family Resources Center, and Veterans' Affairs to develop plans for a new building and combine forces and resources to better meet underserved student populations with overlapping needs
  • HSRC partnered with the Student Leadership and Involvement office to draft and approve a MOU for the use of the cultural kitchen
  • HSRC partnered with University Housing and Dining Services to complete a MOU outlining the policies and procedures regarding Emergency Housing
  • HSRC continued its partnership with the Department of Human Services to update a MOU allowing HSRC to distribute SNAP applications on campus. This partnership was expanded to include office hours at HSRC held by DHS staff during Mealbux week.
  • HSRC staff worked on a series of trainings and facilitations focused on educating the campus about poverty, students in poverty, and ways in which these students can be better served and supported
  • The Food Pantry was featured in the USA Today's article "Campus food banks help students through hard times," which ran February 26, 2012.

Accomplishments

  • HSRC Coordinator, Clare Cady, had an article accepted to the Journal of College and Character entitled "Discussing Poverty as a Student Issue: Making a Case for College Student Services," which will be published in August 2012.
  • The entire HSRC staff put on the "Peanut Butter and Jelly Blowout," giving out over 800 sandwiches in 2 days to promote HSRC and the Food Pantry. This was done along with the BeWell Healthy Eating Initiatives, who purchased bananas to hand out as well
  • Outreach and Food Pantry Staff put on the "Food Pantry Cooking Lesson," which offered the tutelage of chefs from Gathering Together Farms. This event was filmed by KBVR and was broadcast to campus
  • Receipt of a $10,000 grant from the OSU Women's Giving Circle to help establish a floor on the Mealbux Program

New Student Programs and Family Outreach Annual Report 2011-2012

Our Mission

In alignment with the Oregon State University Mission, New Student Programs & Family Outreach serves as a campus leader in facilitating the transition process for new students and their parent/family members. We promote and enhance successful transitions through collaborative programs and outreach.

Goals

  • Support student growth and development throughout their first year at OSU.
  • Provide new students and their families with informative and engaging orientation programs.
  • Support specific transitional resources for unique student populations (e.g. Veterans, international students, Degree Partnership Program students, transfer students, multicultural students, non-traditional students, first-generation students).
  • Familiarize students with the campus and community.
  • Develop supportive partnerships with parents and family members of new students.
  • Provide meaningful student employment and internship opportunities for current OSU students.

Assessment

  • NSPFO has re-instated term orientation sessions. Our first term orientation was offered Spring 2012. 197 newly admitted students attended this term orientation where they received general education information, had access to a student resource fair, met with advisors and registered for classes. NSPFO collaborated with advising offices across campus to ensure students beginning at OSU mid-year were supported in their transition process. Participant feedback was positive. This initiative will continue in future years.
  • NSPFO implemented major programmatic changes to the START program in response to our external review process. Program changes were collaborative in nature and geared towards new START learning outcomes. The START program now begins 4 hours earlier then before, includes more intentional peer-to-peer connections, a shared general education message across all colleges, and more in-depth programming for family members of new students.
  • The support of the Vice-Provost for Student Affairs has allowed NSPFO to secure a new professional staff position, Orientation Advisor. This position will allow NSPFO to focus more on international student orientation, overall assessment, and logistics management for campus-wide orientation programming.
  • NSPFO had a goal last year for increasing services to a variety of student populations. We offered new programming for Veteran students, student parents, non-traditional students and transfer students this year.
  • NSPFO staff and graduate students maintain involvement in a variety of professional development activities at both a regional and national level.

Program Highlights

  • START

    START Total Attendees (who were sent surveys)

    Academic Year Students Family Total
    2010 - 2011 4,482 2,519 7,001
    2011 - 2012 4,399 2,569 6,968
    2012 - 2013 4,482 3,068 7,550

    Percent of students that agreed or strongly agreed with the statement: The overall organization and content of START was helpful in preparing me
    to attend Oregon State University.

    • 91% First Year Students
    • 89% Transfer Students

    Percent of students that agreed or strongly agreed with the statement: I feel prepared to attend OSU in the fall

    Academic Year First Year Transfer
    2011 - 2012 96% 95%
    2012 - 2013 95% 95%

    Percent of students that we met or exceed their expectations for START: How did the START program compare with your expectations?

    Academic Year First Year Transfer
    2011 - 2012 93% 82%
    2012 - 2013 94% 81%
  • U-Engage

    U-Engage is a 2-credit course designed to help students investigate an academic area of interest. In a smaller class environment, new students explore a particular academic area of interest together. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of campus resources and explore the tips & habits of highly successful students.

    U-Engage Courses:

    • Social Justice Theater
    • Future Tech 3.0
    • Exploring Self and Community through Literature and Film
    • The Nature of Change
    • Telling Stories of the Earth
    • Seeing the Forest for the Trees
    • NCAA Football: Supporting Students or Supporting Big Business?
    • Orange & Black, Get Your Health On Track!
    • Lead, Follow or Get Out of the Way
    • Sports Media in the 21st Century
    • The Art of Leadership and Community Building
    • Lunar Forces, Edible Sea Vampires and other Curiosities of the Sea
    • Learning Sexuality
    • Food for the World
    • Money Matters
    • Looking Forward, Reaching Back
    • What Are You Eating?
    • Big Questions
    • How Things Work in Athletic Training and Sports Medicine
    • Science Myth Busters
    • Omegas, Gluten, and High Fructose Corn Syrup
    • Truth about Altered States
    • Global Encounters
    • Cross-Cultural connections
    • What's the Key to Success?
    • One Concussion Too Many
    • Personal and Intercultural Exploration
    • Representations of Teachers in Cinema
    • Overcoming Culture Shock
    • Sport and the Art of Being
    • CHOW!

Video(s)

Student Conduct and Community Standards Annual Report 2011-2012

Student, Family and Community Support Annual Report 2011-2012

Student Life On-Call Team

The Student Life On-Call Team exists to help remove barriers for students so that they can be successful. Students' issues range from the very simple to the very complex, but each situation is deeply important to the student when they call. In addition to calls from students, the team also fields calls from family members, advisers, faculty, staff, and others. Additionally, the team takes calls for consultation that are not directly attributable to a student from faculty, staff, advisers, family members, and students themselves.

A team of nine Student Life professionals rotate being "on call" between the hours of 9 am and 4 pm on weekdays. Contact is typically made by phone and calls are answered as soon as possible after the call is received. Team members assist the callers by listening generously, asking clarifying questions and making referrals to the campus and community resources best suited to the callers' needs.

The Student Life On-Call team took 290 calls for student assistance from students, advisers, faculty, staff and family members.
Some calls included more than one issue.

Incident Type Count Incident Type Count
Academic Issues 32 Assist with Process 63
Family Situation 38 Hospitalization 22
Illness 25 Injury 24
Other Health Related 15 Parent Concern 48
Faculty/Staff Concern 41 Self harm or suicidal ideation 10
Other 12

The Student Life On-Call team also took 284 calls for consultation that were not attributable to a specific student.

Type Count
Advisors 55
Faculty 56
Staff 11
Family Member 89
Student 49
Other 24

Student Care Team

The Student Care Team, during its weekly meetings during Fall, Winter and Spring terms discussed 121 student cases in the course of the academic year. Of those, 73% of them were long-term and complex, necessitating conversation over the course of several weeks. 13% of the cases were on the agenda for between five and nineteen weeks.
Additionally, the SCT addressed many campus issues, typically over the course of several weeks. Examples of those issues are:

  • Alleged bias incident, bike thefts, briefing on investigations, Public Safety / OSP report on trends/issues, and timely warning on suspicious person.
  • Battle of Bands / Flat Tail Festival, Humans vs. Zombies, Shasta, and Undie Run.

2011-12 Student Life On-Call Student Survey: 100 randomly selected students were surveyed about their experience with obtaining assistance, with 34 responses.

  1. Was your call handled within one business day?

    Yes: 34 (100%)

    No: 0

  2. How helpful was the information you received in resolving your situation?

    Very: 30 (88%)

    Somewhat: 4 (12%)

    Not at All: 0

  3. Did you look for answers to your questions online?

    Yes: 16 (47%)

    No: 18 (53%)

  4. If you did look for answers to your questions online, how useful was that?

    Very: 1 (6%)

    Somewhat: 7 (41%)

    Not at All: 9 (53%)

  5. Please provide any other information about your student assistance experience that you would like us to know.

    • I was such a mess when I called. The person I talked to helped me get to CAPS and my advisor. Things are much better now!
    • I ended up withdrawing but I was able to do it with dignity. I will be back.
    • I wish I had called earlier. The solution was way easier than I expected.
    • When the person who helped me found out I had a child she told me about the child care subsidy and connected me with Stephanie. That made my life so much easier!
    • My mom died during finals week. I was ready to quit. The person I talked with helped me with so much more than I thought I needed. She got me to CAPS. She got me to academic counseling and my adviser. Now I have an academic coach and I am healing from my loss. I don't think I could have made it without this help.
    • My person helped me figure out the questions and who to ask them of. I would have never figured it out and probably would have quit school.

2011-12 Student Life On-Call Family Member Survey: 25 randomly selected family members were surveyed about their experience with obtaining assistance, with 15 responses.

  1. Was your call handled within one business day?

    Yes: 15 (100%)

    No: 0

  2. How helpful was the information you received in resolving your situation?

    Very: 15 (100%)

    Somewhat: 0

    Not at All: 0

  3. Did you look for answers to your questions online?

    Yes: 11 (73%)

    No: 4 (27%)

  4. If you did look for answers to your questions online, how useful was that?

    Very: 1 (9%)

    Somewhat: 7 (64%)

    Not at All: 3 (27%)

  5. Please provide any other information about your student assistance experience that you would like us to know.

    • My son was really floundering. We got the connections we needed and he got a 3.7 gpa spring term.
    • My husband died in 2011. My son was devastated and needed to come home from school fall term. He got such kind and gentle care and is much better. He returned winter term. I will be forever grateful.
    • My daughter fell ill winter term. I got help in the short term and then your staff worked with her to figure out what she needed to do.
    • I wish this service existed at my other son's school!
    • My student was critically injured. He and I got all our questions answered and felt very cared for. Thank you.
    • I would not have known what to look for online. The person I talked to was so helpful and very kind.

Veteran's Information Annual Report 2011-2012

Our Mission

Veterans Services helps student veterans successfully navigate the Oregon State University structure while accomplishing their education goals and maximizing their VA benefits.

Assessment

Goal – Student Veteran Outreach:

  • OSU Veterans Workgroup members conducted 9 First year and 4 transfer START Sessions providing 65 student veterans with information on VA education benefits and school related information.
  • Members of the OSU Veterans Workgroup attended the March 1, 2012 Reintegration Summit in Salem, Oregon.
  • Veteran Certifying Officials certified 1,663 Student Veterans in 2011/2012 school year.
  • Gus L. Bedwell held all day meet and greet event in the MU-Vets Lounge on May 16, 2012.

    Twenty veterans and two staff members (one of which was entitled to the Post 9-11 and did not know it) attended the event. Three student veterans signed up for various VA education benefits.

  • Creation of the Veterans at Oregon State University Facebook Page in cooperation with Student Veterans Leaders from the ASOSU Veterans Taskforce, VFSA, and OSU Veterans Fraternity.

Program Highlights

  • Number of student veterans using VA education benefits in 2011-2012 academic year: 1633 (certified a minimum of one time during the duration of the academic year)
  • Number of student veterans interviewed by the Veterans Service Advisor in 2011-2012 academic year. 208 (From March 12, 2012 until June 30, 2012)
  • Partnered with the Human Services Resource Center, Child and Family Resources, Veterans and Family Student Association, and the Associated Students of Oregon State University Veterans Taskforce Director to put on our first annual Connect Week BBQ. Event was held in the Memorial Union Veterans Lounge. Approximately 100 students with family members participated in the two hour long event.
  • Angie, Cathy, and Gus conducted a staff training and START session in September for the Cascades Staff and Students. There were 15 staff members, 8 student veterans, and one outside provider that attend the 1.5 daylong event.

Accomplishments

  • Creation, implementation, and hiring of the Veteran Services Advisor. Members of the OSU Veterans Workgroup and Veterans Advisory Committee participated in hiring process for the Veterans Services Advisor position. The new Veterans Services Advisor, Gus L. Bedwell started on March 12, 2012.
  • Members of the OSU Veterans Workgroup and Advisory Committee worked together to address the DOD – MOU and the President's Executive Order 13067.
  • Members of the OSU Veterans Workgroup attended the Oregon National Guard Reintegration Summit in Salem, Oregon on March 1, 2012.
  • The OSU Veterans Workgroup commissioned the following subcommittees:

    1. Non-Resident Tuition Subcommittee for the purpose of making the manual calculation easier for the Financial Aid Office and clearer communication with student veterans.
    2. Veterans Transition Course Subcommittee for the purpose of creating and implementing a VA approved college course designed to help veterans transition from military culture to the academic setting.
  • Creation of the bi-weekly electronic VA and Military Updates for the OSU Workgroup and Advisory Committee.
  • Creating of the bi-weekly Veteran Service Advisor Newsletter dealing with topics like VA and Military Updates, Employment Opportunities, and Upcoming events.