Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference 09

Speaker Bio Page

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Abbott, Ken
Amirtharaj, Paul
Ariga, Katsuhiko
Ballinger, Clinton
Bartel, Cheryl Moody
Bartel, Joseph
Burrows, Paul
Cao, Guozhong
Cameron, Richard
Carruthers, John
Castagna, Marc
Chang, Chih-hung (Alex)
Chapman, Michael
Cheatham, Lee
Chung, Jae-Hyun
Cohen, David
Dhagat, Pallavi
Drost, Kevin
Du, Dan
Fiez, Terry
Ginger, David
Goncher, Gary
Harris, Matt
Hendricks, Terry
Hensman, Carl
Hjelmstad, Mike
Hochberg, Michael
Hutchinson, Jim
Janda, Joseph
Jovanovic, Goran
Kenney, David
Kellogg, Sean
Khosla, Ajit
Kong, Wei
Lawson, Rhys
Lewis, Nate
Liu, Jun
Lin, Yuehe
Lindquist, Jay
Maddux, Bettye
McIntyre, David
Meyers, Stephen
Miller, John
Murphy, Patrick
Nguyen, Ngoc
O’Halloran, Michael
Ocola, Leonidas
Palmieri, Michele
Palo, Dan
Paul, Brian
Peach, Joseph
Peterson, Richard
Renzoni, George
Ritala, Keith
Roberto, James
Rorrer, Greg
Rung, Robert D. “Skip”
Schowengerdt, Brian
Schumacher, Scott
Silva, Bob
Smith, Rachel
Solanki, Rajendra
Stults, Ray
Tang, Zhiwen
Tomalia, Donald
Trancik, Jessika
Virden, Jud Jr.
Vu, Tania
Wall, Brian
Wegeng, Bob
Weiss, Dirk
Wheaton, Chris
Williams, Chuck
Williams, George
Williams, Thomas
Yan, Mingdi
Yang, Rosa L.
Yip, Angus

 

Panelists:
Cejka, Cheryl
Hochberg, Michael
Hurley, Chris
Lee, Lewis
LeFaivre, Rick
Torina, Jim
Wills, Fiona

 

Abbott, Ken
Hewlett-Packard
Ken Abbott is the Director of Emerging Technology in HP’s Technology Development Organization, part of the Inkjet and Web Solutions Group. In this role he manages a group of scientists, engineers and business professionals to develop and commercialize state-of-the-art MEMS and flexible electronics technologies. Prior to his current role, Mr. Abbott spent 13 years in various leadership and management positions in HP commercializing new printing technology platforms. Prior to joining HP, Mr. Abbott spent six years in the semiconductor industry working for Cypress Semiconductor in the development and manufacturing of submicron CMOS and BiCMOS technologies. Additionally, Mr. Abbott spent two years as an entrepreneur developing optical telecommunication components. Mr. Abbott received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1988, a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1993 and a MBA from Oregon State University in 2008.

Amirtharaj, Paul
Electronics Division within the Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate in ARL
Dr. Paul M. Amirtharaj is currently the Chief of the RF and Electronics Division within the Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate in ARL.  He earned a Ph.D. in Physics from Emory University in 1981 with specialization in Semiconductor Physics, in particular electronic and optical materials development and device applications.  He has held staff positions at the City University of New York (1981-1984), Night Vision and Electro-Optics Laboratory (1984-1990) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (1990-1999).  H has over 60 publications in the field of optical and electronic interactions in semiconductors, including a number of book chapters.

Ariga, Katsuhiko
National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)
Dr. Katsuhiko Ariga is the Director of Supermolecules Group and Principal Investigator of World Premier International Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics at the National Institute for Materials Science. His research field is based on supermolecular chemistry and surface science, including the boundary research areas of organic chemistry, physical chemistry, biochemistry, and materials chemistry. His major interests are the fabrication of novel functional nanostructures based on molecular recognition and self-assembly. He has published about 250 scientific research papers in leading peer-reviewed journals. His research papers have been cited ca. 7000 times (March, 2009).

Ballinger, Clinton
Evident Technologies
Clinton Ballinger, PhD, is the founder and CEO of Evident Technologies, where he developed a strategic focus on translating advanced, proprietary material science (semiconductor nanocrystals, also referred to as “quantum dots”) into new products which solve important technical problems, meet customer needs, and create new markets. At Evident, Dr. Ballinger and his team have created, developed and launched multiple products while actively incorporating partner/customer involvement/feedback. Dr. Ballinger and the Evident management team formulated an execution plan and raised the necessary capital; targeted, negotiated and closed both in- and out-licensing agreements in multiple markets; and set direction for all aspects of the company from technology development to market strategy, sales development, personnel recruitment and the creation of Evident’s corporate culture.

Bartel, Cheryl Moody
Invitrogen Corporation
Cheryl Moody Bartel serves as a R&D Manager in Analytical Chemistry at Invitrogen Corporation. Her recent research interests include characterization of materials and formulations and analytical technique development to ensure sustainable manufacturability of materials and products related to labeling and detection and cell culture. Prior to joining Invitrogen, Dr. Moody Bartel held several leadership roles at the University of California-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Cheryl holds a M.S. in radiochemistry from Washington State University and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Oregon State University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto, under the direction of Professor Scott Mabury.

Bartel, Josh
Life Technologies Corporation
Joe Bartel serves as a R&D Technical Leader in Nanochemistry at Life Technologies Corporation. His recent research interests include development of robust synthetic processes to ensure sustainable manufacturability of nanomaterials and products related to labeling and detection. Joe is also interested in development of novel nanomaterials for new and emerging markets. Prior to joining Life Technologies, Joe Bartel was a scientist at Quantum Dot Corporation responsible for developing uniquely robust processes for the manufacture of quantum dots. Joe also held scientific positions at Xerox and Hewlett-Packard. Joe received a M.S. in Physical Chemistry from Washington State University under the direction of Professor Glen A. Crosby.

Burrows, Paul
Science and Technology Consultant, Washington
Paul Burrows is a Science and Technology Consultantbased in Washington State and can be reached via email at organicdevices@clearwire.net. From 2000 – 2008 he was a Laboratory Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA, operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Inc. While there, he managed a broad research initiative in nanoscience and nanotechnology, applied thin film encapsulation techniques to OLEDs, and built a research program in novel materials for organic solid state lighting. Prior to joining the National Laboratory he was a Research Scholar at Princeton University, where he was part of the research team that developed multiple technology platforms around stacked, transparent, phosphorescent and flexible OLEDs. He has also held research appointments at the University of Southern California and the Riken Institute in Saitama, Japan. He graduated with a PhD in Physics from Queen Mary College, University of London, in 1989, has co-authored over 110 publications and is named as a co-inventor on 78 U.S. Patents.

Cao, Guozhong
University of Washington
Dr. Guozhong Cao is Boeing-Steiner Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Adjunct Professor of Chemical and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington. He has published over 240 refereed papers, authored and edited 5 books and 3 conference proceedings, and presented over 100 invited talks, keynote speeches, and seminars. Currently, Dr. Cao serves as the editor of Annual Review of Nano Research and associate editor of Journal of Nanophotonics.

Cameron, Richard
Infinia Corporation
Rick Cameron is a licensed professional engineer with nearly thirty years of technology development experience ranging from R&D through commercialization.  After the past dozen years at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, he joined Infinia Corporation as the program manager of combined heat and power applications.  Mr. Cameron holds undergraduate degrees in engineering and business and graduate degrees in engineering and management. 

Carruthers, John
Portland State University
Dr. Carruthers is currently Distinguished Professor of Physics at Portland State University. He holds an M.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Lehigh University and a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Toronto. Dr. Carruthers has long-standing research interests in semiconductor and nonlinear optical material crystal growth and characterization, particularly with regard to compositional control to meet requirements for advanced electronic and photonic applications. He managed the Crystal Growth and Glass Research Department at Bell Laboratories and was responsible for the development of optical fiberguides for long-haul, communications applications. He started and managed the Microgravity Science Program at NASA that studied gravitational effects on critical point phenomena, convection, and containerless materials processing. More recently, he started and managed the Components Research program at Intel which was responsible for exploring advanced concepts for lithography, masks, interconnects, transistors, and packaging of integrated circuits that enabled the feature size scaling of Moore’s “Law”. Dr. Carruthers was responsible for starting and managing the EUV lithography program with a consortium of semiconductor companies and three National Laboratories. At present Dr. Carruthers is responsible for the Nanoelectronics, Nanometrology, and Nanobiotechnology Initiative of ONAMI.

Castagna, Marc
FEI Company
Marc Castagna joined FEI as an applications development engineer in April 2000 after working three years in an analytical laboratory for Motorola Semiconductor Products. He is currently assigned to FEI’s North American Nanoport in Hillsboro Oregon.  After more than six years working with semiconductor customers, he changed over to the ESEM product lines. He is currently an applications specialist for FEI ESEMs. He graduated from Arizona State University, receiving a BS in physics in 1997.

Cejka, Cheryl
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Cheryl Cejka is the Director of Technology Commercialization at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, a $1B U.S. Department of Energy research institution operated by Battelle. She leads PNNL’s intellectual property management, portfolio development and investment, and commercialization activities. Ms. Cejka’s areas of expertise include finance, contracts, business and technology development, licensing, and commercialization.  Since her appointment in 2001, Ms. Cejka has led the creation of many significant technology licensing arrangements, including the establishment of several new business ventures based on Battelle-owned and laboratory developed technologies. Under Ms. Cejka’s leadership, PNNL has become a recognized leader in commercialization for “best practices” across the DOE and 300+ federal lab system. She is chair of the National Technology Transfer Working Group’s executive committee, which is comprised of technology transfer leaders across the DOE national lab system, and an active member of the Licensing Executives Society; the Industrial Research Institute; the Association of University Technology Managers; the Washington Economic Development Commission steering committee for technology commercialization; and the advisory board for Washington State University’s Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. Ms. Cejka received a bachelor’s degree in business and marketing and an MBA in finance, both from the University of Washington.

Chang, Chih-hungg (Alex)
Oregon State Universty
An associate professor of chemical engineering at Oregon State University, Dr. Chang’s research interests include electronic materials (growth and characterization), integrated micro-chemical systems, thin film electronics, and nanomaterials processing.

Chapman, Michael
Oregon Health Sciences University
Michael Chapman earned a B.Sc.(Hons) in Cellular & Molecular Biology from King's College (1982), and an M.Sc. in Crystallography from Birkbeck College (1983), also within the University of London.  His Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles (1987) researched the atomic structure of the photosynthetic enzyme, RuBisCO, with David Eisenberg.  Post-doctoral research at Purdue University, with Michael Rossmann, involved structural studies of parvoviruses and picornaviruses.  He spent 13 years on the faculty of Florida State University, ending in 2006 as Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Director of the Center for Biomolecular Computer Modeling & Simulation.  He joined the faculty of OHSU in the Fall of 2006.

Cheatham, Lee
Washington Technology Center, Seattle
Lee Cheatham was appointed Executive Director of Washington Technology Center in 1998. During his tenure, Washington Technology Center has expanded its interactions with companies and communities within Washington State to encourage technology development and job growth. Prior to his position at Washington Technology Center, Dr. Cheatham founded the Strategic Projects Group, a startup software and information services company. In addition, he has held several senior management positions including a 17-year commitment with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In each of his assignments, Dr. Cheatham has focused on the impact of innovation and collaboration. Dr. Cheatham received a bachelor’s degree from Oregon State University and a master’s degree from Washington State University, both in electrical engineering. He has a doctorate in electrical engineering with specialization in optical computing from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Chung,  Jae-Hyun
University of Washington, Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Chung is an assistant professor at Mechanical Engineering of University of Washington. His research field is in micro/nanostructure fabrication, electric field guided assembly, and biosensors.

Cohen, Dave
University of Oregon
David Cohen is a professor of Physics at the University of Oregon. The research in Dr. Cohen's laboratory is directed at trying to obtain a detailed understanding of the electronic properties of disordered semiconductors. Most of such materials currently under study are of interest in efforts to develop inexpensive thin film PV devices.

Dhagat, Pallavi
Oregon State University
Dr. Pallavi Dhagat is presently an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University. Her research interests include magnetic materials and characterization techniques, magnetic sensors and spintronics. Dr. Dhagat holds a doctoral degree in Electrical Engineering from Washington University, St. Louis. Her experience includes 3 years as a recording physicist at Seagate Technology, a leading disk drive company, in Minneapolis. Dr. Dhagat is the recipient of the prestigious CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation and the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Fellowship. She is a Senior Member of the IEEE Magnetics Society and volunteers as Publicity Chair for the Society.

Drost, Kevin
Oregon State Univerity
Dr. Drost is currently an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Director for Business Development at the Microproduct Breakthrough Institute at Oregon State University.  Dr. Drost’s research interests include energy and chemical systems miniaturization. Earlier, Dr. Drost worked at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) where he was a founder and co-Director of the microchannel technology initiative. Dr. Drost has directed numerous multi-million dollar microchannel technology development efforts including four with DARPA and three with DOE.

Du, Dan
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Professor Dan Du obtained her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from Nanjing University in 2005 and then joined the Central China Normal University as an associate professor. Currently she is a visiting scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory working on functionalization of nanomaterials for biosensing and imaging. Dr. Du has about 60 publications.

Fiez, Terri
Azuray Technologies
Terri Fiex is a co-founder and Director at Azuray Technologies. Azuray Technologies designs, manufacturers, and markets highly reliable and efficient power electronics for solar PV systems.  Driven by a highly experienced team of innovators Azuray’s solutions achieve 25 year reliability while simplifying installation and enabling solar technologies to achieve grid parity for broad market adoption.

Ginger, David
Portland State University
David Ginger is an associate professor in the department of chemistry at the University of Washington. Research in his lab focuses on the physical chemistry of nanostructured materials with potential applications in low cost PV, energy efficient light-emitting diodes, and novel biosensors. In particular, he studies conjugated polymers, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots, and plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles.

Goncher, Gary
Portland State University
Gary Goncher is an adjunct professor in the physics department at Portland State University. Dr. Goncher is a veteran of the electronics industry in the Portland area, and his interests include fabrication and properties of self-organized nanostructured materials and their application to photovoltaics and solar hydrogen generation. He has worked with Prof. Raj Solanki on silicon nanowire materials for solar energy, including hybrid organic/inorganic cells and silicon/TiO2 nanostructured materials.

Harris, Matt
FEI Company
Mr. Harris is the Vice President and General Manager of the Life Science division of FEI, a global leader in electron microscopy solutions. In this role he is responsible for FEI’s global Life Sciences business including strategy, R&D, sales & marketing, and application support and development. FEI’s Life Science Division focuses on the development of 3D imaging solutions for nanoscale structural analysis of proteins, virus, macromolecular complexes, and cells, and it is the fastest growing business within FEI’s portfolio. Prior to this position, Mr. Harris was FEI’s Vice President of World Wide Marketing and Business Development. In this role he developed FEI’s global electron microscopy business strategy, marketing plans, and 3rd party relationships for businesses serving Semiconductor, Material Science, and Life Science markets. Prior to FEI, Mr. Harris was with Planar Systems where he was the Vice President of Marketing and Corporate Development and the Vice President and General Manager of Planar’s Medical Business Unit. In these roles he successfully transformed the business strategy and grew Planar’s clinical diagnostic imaging business. Previously Mr. Harris has held Strategy, General Management and Operational roles with Boston Consulting Group and General Electric Medical Systems. Mr. Harris is active in the Portland business community and serves on the boards of the Oregon BioScience Association, the Software Association of Oregon, the Oregon Innovation Network, and the Stanford Business School Alumni Association. In addition, he teaches courses in business strategy at Oregon Health Sciences University’s Oregon Graduate Institute. Mr. Harris has engineering and psychology degrees from Cornell University and an MBA from Stanford University and enjoys the bounties of Portland with his wife Janine and sons Keller and Kai.

Hendricks, Terry
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dr. Hendricks is currently a Senior Program Manager and Client Relationship Manager at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA, where he is responsible for developing and managing programs and initiatives in Energy Recovery, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Technologies, Advanced Thermoelectric & Piezoelectric Systems, and Fuel Cell Systems. One most recent Army Research Laboratory project he managed involved investigating nano-scale surface texturing enhancements on pool and flow boiling heat transfer for advanced power electronic cooling.  Prior to joining PNNL, Dr. Hendricks was the Field Program Manager for the DOE Advanced Heavy Hybrid Propulsion Systems project and the Power & Propulsion Task Leader in the Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems at the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He was also Mechanical Design Manager at Tektronix, Inc., Beaverton, OR on a major cryogenic systems project and Systems Design & Analysis Manager with Advanced Modular Power Systems, Ann Arbor, MI from 1994 - 2000. He has over 25 years of professional experience and expertise in the areas of thermal & fluid systems, energy conversion systems, terrestrial and spacecraft power systems, micro electro-mechanical systems, design optimization, and project management. He was awarded the Midwest Research Institute / Battelle Memorial Institute Chairman’s Award in October 2003 for outstanding performance while at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and a University Fellowship at the University of Texas @ Austin in 1992. Dr. Hendricks received his Ph.D. and Master of Science in Engineering from the University of Texas @ Austin and a Bachelor of Science (Summa Cum Laude) in Physics from the University of Massachusetts @ Lowell. He has written more than 50 technical papers in heat transfer, power systems, thermoelectrics, and cryogenics for national and international conferences and ASME journals; has served as reviewer for the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, ASME Journal of Energy Resources Technology, and AIAA Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer; holds 8 patents, and one ADVISOR software copyright. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the states of California and Texas.

Hensman, Carl
Asemblon
Carl E. Hensman, Ph.D., Vice President - Technology Development, since January 2008. Prior to joining Asemblon, from 2000 to 2008, Dr. Hensman served as Chief Scientist, Principal and Director on the Board of Frontier Geosciences Inc., a third party R&D contract analytical laboratory, where he focused on the energy industries. Previously, Dr. Hensman has worked for DowElanco, Exxon and British Coal. In addition Dr. Hensman is an Adjunct Faculty member at Clemson University, served on the National Coal Council, and the NCC Coal Policies Board. Dr. Hensman has secured funding for multi-million dollar projects, published in over a dozen peer-reviewed journals, given more than 60 presentations at international conferences, co-written two book chapters and served as a scientific advisor at the State and Federal level. Dr. Hensman received his Doctorate from New Mexico State University in Chemistry and spent 2.5 years as a postdoctoral fellow at The Ohio State University.

Hjelmstad, Mike
Washington Technology Center
Michael Hjelmstad received his B.S. (’00) and M.S. (’04) in Materials Science from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. His research focused on spintronic material growth and characterization using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and cross-sectional STM (XSTM). Mr. Hjelmstad moved to Seattle in 2004 and became a process engineer at Washington Technology Center with a focus on photolithography and etching. He became the Microfabrication Lab Manager in the fall of 2006.

Hochberg, Michael
Univeristy of Washington
Michael Hochberg Ph.D has co-founded two companies: Simulant, which sold the first commercial distributed FDTD code, and Luxtera, a venture-funded company working to commercialize silicon photonics. Dr. Hochberg's research interests include silicon photonics, nonlinear optics, and ultra-low drive voltage optical modulators. He was on the team that first demonstrated that slot waveguides could be combined with electro-optic polymers to obtain exceptionally low drive voltage modulators. Recently, he has demonstrated that this technique can be used to create modulators with drive voltages of 0.25 V, over an order-of-magnitude lower value than what is typically achieved with Lithium Niobate based optical modulators. More recently, Dr. Hochberg has been involved in a demonstration that the force of an optical mode in a waveguide could be used to directly actuate a nano-mechanical system. Dr. Hochberg recently joined the faculty at the University of Washington in Electrical Engineering, where he was the recipient of an Air Force Office of Sponsored Research Young Investigators Program award in 2007, and was awarded a PECASE award in 2009. His work has been featured in Nature Materials, Nature, and other journals. Dr. Hochberg received his BS (Physics, 2002), his MS (Applied Physics, 2005) and his PhD (Applied Physics, 2006) from Caltech.

Hurley, Chris
Beacon Law Advisors
Chris Hurley is a co-founder and Principal at Beacon Law Advisors in Seattle, Washington and has been working with technology startups for over 16 years. He began his career as a corporate lawyer with Gray Cary in Palo Alto in 1993 advising technology start-ups. In 1998 he joined Venture Law Group as a senior attorney working intimately with his technology startup clients. During his career, Chris has worked closely with over 40 technology startups, closed over 90 private placement financings, closed over 45 acquisitions, closed countless licensing and distribution deals, and closed over 8 IPOs. He has worked with networking companies, software companies, medical device companies, wireless companies, biotech companies, internet companies, and media companies, among others. Mr. Hurley received his B.A. in Classics (magna cum laude) from the University of New Hampshire, his J.D. (cum laude) from Boston College Law School, his M.B.A. in Finance from Boston University's Graduate School of Management, and his LLM in Taxation from the University of Washington School of Law. He is a member of the California and Washington bars.

Hutchinson, Jim
University of Oregon
Lokey-Harrington Professor of Chemistry and Associate Vice President for Research and Strategic Initiatives at the University of Oregon. His research interests are in green chemistry, materials chemistry and nanoscience.  He led the development of the University of Oregon's nation-leading program in "green" (environmentally-benign) organic chemistry and launched the university’s pioneering Center in Green Nanoscience.  He is a member of the leadership team for the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI). He founded, and now directs, the ONAMI’s Safer Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Initiative.  He is a member of the Governing Board of the ACS Green Chemistry Institute.  He has won a number of awards, including an NSF-CAREER award and the 2003 Oregon Academy of Science Outstanding Teacher of Science and Math in Higher Education.  Hutchison is an Alfred P. Sloan research fellow and a Camille Dreyfus teacher-scholar.  He is the author of 90 refereed publications, three book chapters and the text book Green Organic Chemistry: Strategies, Tools and Laboratory Experiments. 

Janda, Joseph
Portland State University
Joseph Janda is an Innovation Associate in Portland State University’s office of Innovation and Industry Alliances. In this role Joseph manages the intellectual property of innovative projects and research at PSU with a mission to see university innovation developed and used for public benefit. Prior to joining PSU, Joseph worked in technology transfer offices at Stony Brook University in New York and George Mason University in Virginia. He has moved technologies and knowledge from university labs to commercial entities for five years, and assisted in the formation of two successful university start-up companies in the field of cancer diagnostics and drug screening. Joseph holds a B.S. in Integrated Science and Technology with a concentration in Biotechnology from James Madison University, and an M.A. in Molecular Biology from Stony Brook University. He has worked as a house painter, veterinary technician’s assistant, high school teacher, biotechnology manufacturing technician, door to door vacuum cleaner salesman, and once spent a summer collecting colorful images of human molars being zapped with a laser.

Jovanovic, Goran
Oregon State University
Dr. Jovanovic received his B.Sc. degree in chemical engineering from Belgrade University (Belgrade, Yugoslavia) in 1971.  He was awarded the Fulbright Grant for graduate study in US  where he received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering in 1974 and 1979, respectively.  Dr. Jovanovic taught chemical engineering at Belgrade University from 1979 to 1991.  In 1991 he moved back to US at Oregon State University where he is currently Full Professor teaching in the Department of Chemical Engineering.
Dr. Jovanovic research interest is focused in two areas of microtechnology: i) development of microscale chemical reactors, and ii) development of microscale separation processes. His interest in microscale technologies started in mid 1980s when, as part of a research team at Belgrade University, he developed the first semi-artificial pancreas based on microscale cell immobilization and encapsulation.  Currently, Dr. Jovanovic is developing a new class of highly miniaturized, fluidics-based devices for production of biofuels (biodiesel synthesis, desulphurization of fossil fuels), and for biomedical applications (kidney dialyser, haemo-oxygenator, semi-artificial veins and arteries). Graduate students in his laboratory are developing microscale biosensors, microscale chemical reactors, and microscale separation operations suitable for the development of a variety of microscale based chemical processes. 
Dr. Goran Jovanovic is the recipient of numerous honors, and professional and scholastic awards.  Some of his recent awards include: Austin Paul Engineering Faculty Award (OSU - 1997); Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award (WERC Consortium & Los Alamos National Laboratory - 1999), Elizabeth Ritchie OSU Distinguished Professor Award (OSU - 2001); Collaborative Research Award, (OSU College of Engineering - 2003); OSU College of Engineering Research Award (OSU - 2005); OSU College of Engineering Alumni Award (OSU - 2006), and Life Long Achievement Award WERC Consortium New Mexico State University (2008). Currently Dr. Jovanovic mentors two M.Sc. and three Ph.D. students.  He has published over 100 papers, 15 of which are monograph contributions.  He delivered over 50 invited lectures and seminars, over 75 presentations at scientific conferences, and completed 62 research projects.

Kellogg, Sean
FEI Company
Sean Kellogg is a senior scientist in FEI Company's Beam Technology Division.

Kenney, David
Oregon BEST
David Kenney is the President and Executive Director of the Oregon Built Environment & Sustainable Technologies Center (Oregon BEST), a university-industry collaboration focused on growing and utilizing Oregon’s research capabilities in green building and renewable energy to support economic growth in the state.  Kenney has over 15 years of business experience, knowledge of sustainable business practices and nonprofit management experience as a board leader of a sustainable agriculture education center. During a 12-year tenure at Intel Corporation, Kenney held a wide range of roles in finance, project management and business and organizational operations. During his last seven years there, he helped build Intel Solution Services, a technical consulting organization, from its start to an organization operating in more than ten countries worldwide. He also co-founded and led the Intel Employee Sustainability Network.  Before joining Intel, Kenney was a Senior Consultant with Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group in Portland. Kenney serves as board chair of Friends of Zenger Farm, a nonprofit urban farm that offers education programs on sustainable agriculture to approximately 3,000 school students annually. He helped the organization establish a strong base of financial support as it expanded its programs and completed a major green building renovation of the historic farmhouse on the property. A native Oregonian and graduate of Sprague High School in Salem, he holds a BA from the University of Washington and an MBA and Certificate of Public Management from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business.

Khosla, Ajit
School of Engineering Science
Khosla is a member of Micro-Instrumentation Lab at Simon Fraser University. His area of research involves development of Novel Micropatternable Multifunctional Nanocomposite Materials for Nano and Micro Systems.

Kong, Wei
Oregon State University
Wei Kong is professor of Physical Chemistry at Oregon State University.  Her primary focus is electronic spectroscopy of gas phase biologically related materials and nanomaterials.  She received her B.Sc. from Beijing University, Ph.D. from University of Waterloo, Canada, and PDF in the Department of Chemistry from Cornell University.  Professor Kong was awarded the NSERC Doctoral Thesis Prize as well as the NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and the Thomas T Sugihara Young Faculty research Award. 

Lawson, Rhys
Christensen O'Connor Johnson Kindness PLCC
A lifelong resident of the Pacific Northwest, Rhys has a J.D. and Ph.D. in chemistry and nanotechnology from the University of Washington and is an associate at Christensen O’Connor Johnson Kindness PLLC in Seattle. As a research scientist, Rhys developed novel hybrid silicon/ organic electro optic device as part of a DARPA program. His intellectual property law practice focuses primarily on patent preparation and prosecution in the areas of general micro/nano technologies, MEMS/NEMS, applied chemistry, electronics, photonics, optoelectronics, and organic functional materials and devices.

Lee, Lewis
Lee & Hayes PLLC
Lewis Lee is a co-founder of Lee & Hayes PLLC, and has developed expertise in many diverse technologies and business processes.  His firm counsels clients on all facets of IP portfolio creation and utilization as a business asset, including strategic planning, development, management and competitive analysis.  Mr. Lee has co-authored two books, Intellectual Property for the Internet in 1997 and Managing Intellectual Property Rights in 1993.  He has served as a board member (and past chair) of the Washington State University Research Foundation and as a Washington State University Foundation trustee.  Mr. Lee Lewis also serves on the advisory boards of the Honors College and Entrepreneurship Program at WSU, and on the Applied Sciences Laboratory (ASL) in Spokane. Mr. Lee received his J.D. from George Washington University Law School, and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and B.A in Business Administration from Washington State University.

LeFaivre, Rick
OVP Venture Partners
Rick LeFaivre, Ph.D is a Partner at OVP Venture Partners, where he focuses on technology-based investments in information technology, digital biology and digital energy. Dr. LeFaivre’s career accomplishments include roles as a computer scientist, professor, R&D executive and venture advisor working at elite universities, high-technology companies and venture firms. He served as VP of the Advanced Technology Group at Apple Computer, as SVP of R&D and CTO at Borland International, and held R&D management positions at Silicon Graphics, Sun Microsystems and Tektronix. He started his career as a professor in the computer science department at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, teaching and carrying out research in artificial intelligence and advanced programming technology, and later served as Executive Director of the Von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at the University of California, San Diego, focused on the effective commercialization of university-developed technology. Rick has published extensively in the computer science literature, and has served on a number of industry and academic advisory boards. He received his AB in Mathematics from the University of Missouri and his MS and Ph.D in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin.

Lewis, Nate
California Institute of Technology
Dr. Nathan Lewis, George L. Argyros Professor of Chemistry, has been on the faculty at the California Institute of Technology since 1988 and has served as Professor since 1991. He has also served as the Principal Investigator of the Beckman Institute Molecular Materials Resource Center at Caltech since 1992. From 1981 to 1986, he was on the faculty at Stanford, as an assistant professor from 1981 to 1985 and as a tenured Associate Professor from 1986 to 1988. Dr. Lewis received his Ph.D in Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Lewis has been an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, and a Presidential Young Investigator. He received the Fresenius Award in 1990, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry in 1991, the Orton Memorial Lecture award in 2003, the Princeton Environmental Award in 2003 and the Michael Faraday Medal of the Royal Society of Electrochemistry in 2008. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Royal Society of Chemistry journal, Energy & Environmental Science. He has published over 300 papers and has supervised approximately 60 graduate students and postdoctoral associates.

Liu, Jun
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dr. Jun Liu is a Laboratory Fellow in Chemical and Materials Sciences Division at PNNL.  Dr. Liu was recently elected a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society and publishes the journal Science.  Among his many contributions, Liu pioneered the development and understanding of nanoporous materials, and contributed greatly to the development, understanding, and commercialization of self-assembled functional nonoporous materials, and to the development of environmentally friendly solution approaches for oriented nanostructures.  The technology Dr. Liu has developed has unprecedented efficiency and capacity and has received major awards, including a recent U.S. Department of Energy award for technology transfer.  Liu is the author and co-author of more than 100 technical papers, an invited author for many book chapters, and a co-author and editor of several books. He has numerous patents and is a sought-after speaker. Also, he is a member of the American Ceramic Society, the Materials Research Society and the American Chemical Society.

Lin, Yuehe
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dr. Yuehe Lin joined Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 1997. Recently, he has been actively working in the nanotechnology area, particularly in the development of new nanobioelectronic devices and nanomaterials for biomedical diagnosis and drug delivery. His other research activities include developing integrated microanalytical systems for environmental and biomedical analysis, and synthesizing functional nanomaterials for biosensor development, fuel cell, and water treatment applications. Dr. Lin is the editor of the book Handbook of Electrochemical Nanotechnology. He also serves as the North American Editor for the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, the associate editor of the Advanced Science Letters, and Member of Editorial Advisory Board of other 15 international journals.  Dr. Lin has 13 patents (10 issued, 3 pending). Most of the patents have been licensed to industrial partners for commercialization.

Lindquist, Jay
Dune Sciences
Jay Lindquist is President of Technology Business Development LLC, a consulting firm he founded in 2005, CEO of Dune Sciences, a nanotechnology based startup out of the University of Oregon, and Manager of the ONAMI Gap Fund and Commercialization Program. As Manager of the ONAMI Gap Fund, Jay brings a combined business and venture mindset to economic development, and has helped with the formation and early proof-of-concept funding for 15 companies, leveraging $2M in grants to more than $13M in additional funding. As CEO of Dune Sciences Corp., one of the companies which successfully completed the ONAMI Gap Program, Jay is currently working with the Dune team to bring its first products to market as an ultra-durable antimicrobial coating for footwear and hospital linens. Jay holds a Ph.D. degree in Physical Chemistry from the University of California, a B.Sc. in Chemistry with minors in Mathematics and Biology from the University of Puget Sound, and completed the Executive MBA program at Stanford University.

Maddux, Bettye
Safer Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Initiative (SNNI), Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI)
Dr. Bettye Maddux is the assistant director of the Safer Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Initiative (SNNI), a major research thrust of the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI). Previously, she served as an associate specialist and research biophysicist at the University of California, Santa Barbara with joint appointments in the Materials Research Laboratory, the Department of Physics, and the Marine Biotechnology Institute. Her major research interests included studying the mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis and self-assembly of biocomposite materials and analyzing the nanoscale properties of strong and tough biopolymers. Dr. Maddux has been actively engaged public policy and promoting SNNI’s proactive design strategies. She currently serves on the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) US Technical Advisory Group to the to the International Organization on Standardization’s (ISO) Technical Committee on Nanotechnologies 229 and participates in the working group on developing standards for environmental, health and safety of engineered nanomaterials. She is a reviewer for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s EMSL Proposal Committee and an ad hoc reviewer for the American Chemical Society and Biophysical Society. She has served on the program committee for the annual MicroNano Breakthrough Conference for the past three years and is a conference organizer for SNNI’s annual Greener Nano Conference. She earned her Ph.D. in biological sciences with an emphasis in chemical carcinogenesis/biophysics from the University of Texas at Austin. She has published peer-reviewed research articles, a book chapter, policy-related reports and invited articles as ‘Bettye L. Smith’ and ‘Bettye L.S. Maddux’ in the fields of nanotechnology, biophysics, materials science, biochemistry and chemical carcinogenesis.

McIntyre,  David
Oregon State University
David H. McIntyre is an Associate Professor of Physics at Oregon State University.  He obtained his B.S. degree from the University of Arizona (1980) and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University (1984, 1987).  He worked at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics before going to Oregon State University in 1989.  His research interests are in laser spectroscopy and optical physics.  His current projects include optical trapping of particles with laser tweezers, optical characterization of wide bandgap semiconductors, and solution-based processing of optical devices.

Meyers, Stephen
Inpria
Stephen Meyers is an early employee of Inpria, a Corvallis, OR based company focused on developing disruptive manufacturing methods using inexpensive, and environmentally benign ink chemistries designed for high-performance electronic and optical materials. Stephen is the architect of multiple dielectric and semiconductor materials within the Inpria portfolio. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Oregon State University.

Miller, John
Dune Sciences
Dr. Miller has extensive experience in technology management and in the development and commercialization of new nanomaterials and devices. His primary expertise is in the stored energy and energy conversion areas including Li ion batteries, fuel cells, and ultracapacitors. Prior to founding Dune Sciences, Dr. Miller served as Director of Fuel Cell Technology at World Energy Labs in San Francisco, CA. Prior to that he served as Technical Director for T/J Technologies, Inc. in Ann Arbor, MI where he was responsible for the development of new materials that are presently being used in commercial high rate Li ion batteries.

Murphy, Patrick
The University Funds
Mr. Murphy has spent the bulk of his career launching and growing leading edge technology companies. When not building his own startups and creating new business applications, or serving as a member of executive teams with other startups, he has been providing strategic sales and marketing consulting to some of the world’s largest technology firms, including Microsoft, AT&T, Intel, Qwest, and others. Since 2005 he has served as a Principal at Lawrence Associates LLC, an IT consulting firm specializing in developing strategic marketing and sales models. Mr. Murphy served six years as a Board Member and Managing Partner of NetMinds Consulting, Inc., a business consulting and virtual incubator group he co-founded in 1999. At NetMinds, he specialized in interim executive management, market-entry acceleration, seed/angel funding and M&A consulting for early-stage software and web services firms. Prior to co-founding NetMinds, Mr. Murphy spent 16 years working with several technology companies in the healthcare, hospitality/gaming, small business accounting, education, business management applications and telecom sectors. Mr. Murphy has extensive experience in creating marketing strategies, and building sales teams and reseller channels for startups. He has established strategic partnerships with many large companies such as British Telecom, AT&T, Novell, Inktomi, and Qwest. Mr. Murphy has held Advisory Board positions for various technology companies, and has served with several educational and non-profit organizations. Mr. Murphy received his B.S in Agricultural Economics and an M.B.A. in Finance from Washington State University, where he also taught a Strategic Business Management course from 1982 to 1984. He currently serves on the National Board of Advisors and previously served on the Entrepreneurial Studies Program Advisory Board for his alma mater’s College of Business.

Nguyen, Ngoc
University of Oregon
Ngoc Thanh Nguyen, Ph.D. Dr. Nguyen is currently a post doctoral researcher at the University of Oregon working on thermoelectric materials. His research focuses on design a superlattice structure based on misfit layer compounds and others. The new materials have exceptional low thermal conductivity, which have potential application as thermoelectric materials.

O’Halloran, Michael
CH2M HILL
Michael O’Halloran is Director of Technology for the Electronics and Advanced Technology Group of CH2M HILL.  CH2M HILL ranks as one of the top 5 international engineering design firms and is “the” top ranked firm in several categories including manufacturing, construction management and program management.  Mr. O’Halloran’s responsibilities include advising his co-workers about technology in the rapidly changing manufacturing areas of Semiconductors, Flat Panel Display, Photovoltaics, MEMS and Nano-research.  He is also tasked with finding and investigating future manufacturing technologies which may present business opportunities for the company.  Mr. O’Halloran has more than 15 years experience with CH2M HILL.  Prior to joining CH2M HILL he was Engineering Manager for a large international semiconductor wafer manufacturer.  His technical education includes a BS in Mechanical Engineering, a BS in Nuclear Engineering, a Masters in Mechanical Engineering and an MBA.

Ocola, Leonidas
Argonne National Laboratory
Dr. Leonidas Ocola (Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1996; postdoc: University of Wisconsin-Madison) is an internationally recognized expert in electron beam lithography. Dr. Ocola is from Peru where he did his undergraduate study in Physics. He received his B.Sc. from the Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Lima, Peru) in 1988.  He has held industry positions at Bell Laboratories, first with Lucent Technologies and then with Agere Systems, a later spin-off.  His research interests include electron beam lithography and simulating high-energy electron beam interactions with polymer materials, scanning probe characterization techniques, FTIR micro-spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, nanofluidic devices and nano-photonics.

Palmieri, Michele
STMicroelectronics
Michele Palmieri is currently the R&D Director of the Microfluidics Division at STMicroelectronics. In 1989 he received a master's degree in Electronic Engineering with a specialization in device physics from the Politecnico of Milan University (Italy). He jointed ST in 1989 as resident research student with a degree thesis on Physical-Chemistry of Oxygen in semiconductor devices.He has covered various positions in process and technology development of Smart-Power BCD platforms. More recently he has led the developemnt and market introduction of Lab-on-Chip and other microfluidic applications.  His leisure interests include sailing, diving and literature.

Palo, Dan
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dr. Palo, a senior research  scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been active in the area of microreactor technology for over ten years. During that time, he has focused on microreactor design and development along with system integration in the areas of fuel processing, fuel cells, portable power, portable cooling, high-volume catalyst production, multi-parallel catalyst screening, process intensification, C1 chemistry, renewable energy, and integration of micro/nano technologies. Along with others at PNNL and OSU, he has authored two review articles on the use of microchannel technology for both reactive and non-reactive applications. In 2007, he was lead author on a Chemical Reviews article covering hydrogen production from methanol.  More recently, Dr. Palo has led numerous large proposal efforts that include National Lab – Industry – University partnerships, and he is active in managing and conducting research and development efforts related to energy, chemicals, and nanomaterials. Dr. Palo has been recognized at PNNL as a top-30 inventor across the Laboratory and as a Key Contributor multiple times. He has published and presented extensively and holds two US patents in microchannel process technology.

Paul, Brian
Oregon State University
Brian K. Paul is Co-Director of the ONAMI Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and a Professor of Manufacturing Engineering in the School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU). Dr. Paul’s research interests include microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing, microchannel process technology for greener nanosynthesis, and the packaging of arrayed microfluidics. Dr. Paul has received numerous awards including the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the International Engineering Design and Automation Young Faculty Award, the OSU Engelbrecht Young Engineering Faculty Award and the OSU College of Engineering Research Collaboration Award. Dr. Paul has authored or co-authored over 50 refereed publications, patents or book chapters on microlamination, layered manufacturing, material joining and general manufacturing. He is a past associate editor for the ASME Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering and the SME Journal of Manufacturing Processes. He is a Scientific Committee Member for the SME North American Manufacturing Research Conference and an active member of SME, IIE and ASME.

Peach, Joseph
University of Washington
Joseph E. T. Peach received his B.S.E.E. from Princeton University in 2003, where he did his undergraduate research on dielectrophoretic devices with Prof. James Sturm. He joined the Microscale Life Sciences Center at the University of Washington that fall and developed microfluidic devices to perform on-chip real-time polymerase chain reaction for quantifying nucleic acid sequences from single cells. He received his M.S.E.E. in 2006, and began developing dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) devices with Prof. Lih Lin and Prof. Vikram Jandhyala. His DEP-FFF research has been awarded grants from the Washington Research Foundation and the Technology Gap Innovation Fund. Two patent applications are pending for the technologies under development, and after completing his Ph.D. in 2009, Mr. Peach will explore the commercialization potential of his DEP-FFF separation technology.

Peterson, Richard
Oregon State University
Richard B. Peterson received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1984.  He is currently a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Oregon State University. His specialty areas include heat transfer, thermodynamics, and combustion, especially in miniature and microscale energy systems with emphasis on microtechnology enhanced heat engines and thermal components.  Dr. Peterson has been on the faculty at Oregon State University since 1985 where he continues his research in the area of thermal/fluids.  Currently, Dr. Peterson is an active member of the MECS (Microtechnology-based Energy and Chemical Systems) Group within the College of Engineering.  This group, among other activities, is using microlamination to build energy conversion devices such as miniature and microscale heat engines, heat pumps, and micro combustors.  Specific work in this area includes the analysis of microsystems that employ a temperature difference for their operation and examining the performance of these devices when scaled. Also, programs are being directed by Dr. Peterson to develop heat actuated heat pump and power systems where combined cycles can effectively utilize thermal sources.  Dr. Peterson is an active member of ASME and AAAS.  He reviews manuscripts for a variety of professional journals and conferences as well as organizes workshops and technical sessions at national meetings.  He is a member of the K-11 subcommittee of ASME on heat transfer in combustion and fires, and has chaired the Committee on Miniature Energy Systems in the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME.  Dr. Peterson has over 60 papers in both refereed journals and conference proceedings and his work has been supported by a variety of sources including the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense (DARPA, ARL, AFOSR, and the Army), the Department of Energy, and various corporate sponsors. He currently directs the Advanced Tactical Energy Systems Program at OSU and is an Associate Director of the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute.

Renzoni, George
Christensen O’Connor Johnson Kindness PLLC
George is a partner at the intellectual property law firm of Christensen O’Connor Johnson Kindness PLLC in Seattle. George’s practice centers on chemistry-related technologies and he assists universities, research institutions, and large and small companies in establishing and protecting intellectual property rights. In addition to patent procurement and portfolio development, George also counsels on freedom-to practice, intellectual property due diligence, and technology licensing.

Ritala, Keith
University of Washington College of Engineering, Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology
Keith E. Ritala is the IP & Industrial Agreements Manager, College of Engineering, Institute for Advanced Materials & Technology, University of Washington. Keith Ritala develops collaborative research projects between industry and the College of Engineering’s faculty and is the industrial outreach manager for the UW’s new Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology. The iAMT provides leadership in interdisciplinary materials research and technology commercialization in photonics, energy, biomaterials and advanced composite materials campus-wide. Prior to his current position, Keith was a Licensing Officer at UW TechTransfer, where managed intellectual property arising from research in engineering and the physical sciences. Before that, he was with the Washington Technology Center for twelve years, where he developed industry-university research partnerships, managed the Microfabrication Laboratory, and directed the WTC’s MEMS, photonics and nanotechnology initiatives. Keith has 20 years’ experience in the electronic materials industry, where he was a specialist in compound semiconductors and ultra-high purity metals. Keith holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from Hamline University and the University of Oregon, respectively.

Roberto, James
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Jim Roberto is currently Director of Strategic Capabilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a Senior Vice President of UT-Battelle, LLC, the management and operating contractor for ORNL.   He joined the Laboratory in 1974 after completing a PhD in applied physics from Cornell University and most recently served as ORNL’s Deputy for Science and Technology (2004-2009) and Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences (1999-2004).  His research interests include neutron and x-ray scattering, ion-surface interactions, materials for fusion reactors, and nanoscale science and technology.  He is a former president of the Materials Research Society and has served on numerous National Research Council committees and testified before Congress on nanotechnology and energy-related issues.  He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the recipient of the 2004 National Materials Advancement Award from the Federation of Materials Societies.

Rorrer, Greg
Oregon State University
An associate professor in the department of chemical engineering at Oregon State University, Dr. Rorrer’s research interests include the biological synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors.

Rung, Robert D. “Skip”
Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI)
Mr. Rung is a senior high technology R&D executive with over 25 years of R&D management experience in CMOS process technology, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design and electronic design automation (EDA), IC packaging, MEMS, microfluidics, and inkjet printing. Mr. Rung was asked in December 2003 to lead Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI), Oregon’s first “Signature Research Center” and an unprecedented collaboration among Oregon’s research universities and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ONAMI’s dual mission is to grow “small tech” research in Oregon and commercialize technology in order to extend the success of Oregon’s world-leading “Silicon Forest” technology cluster, which includes the most advanced R&D and manufacturing operations for leading companies such as Intel Corporation, Hewlett-Packard Company, FEI Company, Invitrogen, Electro Scientific Industries, Planar Systems, Xerox Office Products, Tektronix, ON Semiconductor and many dynamic smaller firms. ONAMI has so far received $37M in state investment and approximately tripled Oregon’s annual federal and private research awards in the fields of nanolaminates and transparent/printed electronics, green nanotechnology, nanoscale metrology, and microtechnology- based energy and chemical systems (MECS). The ONAMI gap fund has helped launch or enable over 10 new startup companies since late 2006.

Schowengerdt, Brian
University of Washington
Brian Schowengerdt is a senior research scientist in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington. Schowengerdt received his Bachelor’s degree (summa cum laude) in 1997 from the University of California, Davis, with a triple major in psychology, philosophy, and German. He received his Ph.D. (University of California, Davis) in psychology, with an emphasis in cognition and perception, in 2004. Since 2001, he has been working in the Human Interface Technology Laboratory at the University of Washington, where he conducted a portion of his doctoral research and studied display system design and optical engineering. Schowengerdt is the Chair of the Display System committee of the Society for Information Display, organizing the SID’s International Symposia. He is an associate editor of the Journal of the SID and a guest editor for Information Display magazine. Schowengerdt has given a number of invited talks on 3D display technologies at academic and display industry conferences, as well as for companies such as Pixar and Sharp Labs of America.

Schumacher, Scott
Peak Sun Silicon
Scott Schumacher is Vice President for Sales and Marketing at Peak Sun Silicon. Peak Sun is a provider of reliable granular forms of silicon to the solar industry, providing high-speed, high-volume factory production, less material waste, and lower-cost source materials.

Silva, Bob
Pacific Nortwest National Laboratory
Bob Silva has over 25 years of experience in senior level positions in areas such as technology development, technology commercialization, and general company management.  At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Bob manages a large portion of the rapidly growing energy technology intellectual property portfolio, which contains more than 400 invention, 200 U.S. patents, and 150 foreign patents.  Prior to joining the laboratory in 2000, Bob served as President of Knovation, Inc., a start-up computer services and telecommunications marketing joint venture with Lockheed Martin.  Before that he was Vice President of Operation and General Manager of RJ Lee Solutions, an early stage multi-coast custom software development venture.  In addition, Bob has directed commercialization for Westinghouse Hanford Company and has held several director-level management positions with NCH Corporation, a Fortune 600 specialty chemicals manufacturer headquartered in Irving, TX.  Bob has a B.S. in Biochemistry and an MBA.

Smith, Rachel
Life Technologies Corporation
Rachel K. Smith is an analytical chemist in the Nanoscience Division at Life Technologies. Her research interests lie in developing new analytical methods for characterizing both the inorganic and organic components of semiconductor nanocrystals to be used in labeling and detection applications. Rachel holds a B.A. in biochemistry from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under the direction of Paul Alivisatos.

Solanki, Rajendra
Portland State University
Rajendra Solanki is a professor of physics at Portland State University. Dr. Solanki’s research interests are in electronic and photonic materials and devices, high-k dielectrics, copper interconnects, atomic layer deposition, bio-sensors, and nanoelectronics.

Stults, Ray
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
Ray Stults is the Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado.   Dr. Stults is responsible for the fundamental research at NREL including: chemistry, biology, physics, scientific computing and materials science.  He is the program manager for research at NREL sponsored by DOE’s Office of Science and he leads NREL’s expansion of basic research programs that underpin NREL’s applied research in solar, biomass, wind, buildings, and transportation.  Dr. Stults develops and maintains effective business relationships with government and industry and works with NREL management and staff to maintain and strengthen established research programs in addition to developing new programs that meet U.S. energy demands. Dr. Stults has more than thirty years of experience in conducting and managing research in industry and at four DOE National Laboratories.   He received a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Nebraska in 1974 and completed a two-year post doctoral assignment at Texas A&M University under Professor F. A. Cotton.   Joining the Central Research Laboratories of Monsanto Company in 1976, he advanced to the position of Monsanto Fellow before joining Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1986.  Over his fifteen years at PNNL, Dr. Stults held several management positions and was a leader in the design and construction of a $230M national user facility, the Environmental Molecular Sciences laboratory (EMSL).  Ray joined the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory as Associate Director for Science in 2000; transferred to Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2003 as Director for Office of Science Programs; and, assumed his NREL position in April of 2005. A hallmark of Dr. Stults’ career has been the development and utilization of DOE national user facilities.  In 1980, he began conducting research at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was instrumental in the justification and construction of specialized beam-lines for environmental research at both the SSRL and Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source (APS).  He led the development of PNNL’s proposal to DOE that resulted in the construction of the EMSL; he was instrumental in developing the capture strategy for Battelle’s winning proposal to manage and operate the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and, he most recently led the effort to construct a new nano-scale science center at Los Alamos.

Tang, Zhiwen
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dr. Zhiwen Tang obtained his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from Hunan University in 2004. Now he works as a postdoctoral research associate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. His research interests include nano-biosensor, molecular engineering and instrumental prototyping.

Tomalia, Donald
National Dendrimer Center at Central Michigan University
Don Tomalia received his B.A. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and, while at The Dow Chemical Company (1962-1990), completed his Ph.D. in physical-organic chemistry from Michigan State University (1968) under the mentorship of Professor Harold Hart. His discovery of the cationic polymerication of 2-oxazolines led to two international industrial research awards (R&D-100) for creative research in 1978 and 1986. His discovery of dendrimers (dentritic architecture) in 1979 led to a third R&D-100 Award in 1991 and the Leonardo da Vinci Award (Paris, France) in 1996. He recently received the Society of Polymer Science Japan (SPSJ) Award for Outstanding Achievement in Polymer Science (2003) for discovery of the fourth major macromolecular architectural class, dendritic polymers. In 1990, he joined Michigan Molecular Institute (MMI) as Professor and Director of Nanoscale Chemistry and Architecture (1990-1999). Dendritech, Inc., the first commercial producer of dendrimers, was co-founded by Dr. Tomalia in 1992, after which, he was named founding President and Chief Scientist (1992-2000). He became V.P. of Technology for MMI (1998-2000) while simultaneously serving as Scientific Director for the Biologic Nanotechnology Center, University of Michigan Medical School (1998-2000). Dr. Tomalia founded Dendritic Nanotechnologies, Inc. (DNT), Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, in a joint venture with Starpharma Pooled Development (Melbourne, Australia) (2002). He serves as Chief Scientific Officer of this dendrimer-based nanotechnology company with production and laboratory facilities located at Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. He was recently appointed scientific director of the National Dendrimer & Nanotechnology Center located on the Central Michigan Campus (2004). Presently, he serves as the DNT Principal Investigator in the Massachusetts Institute for Technology/Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (MIT/ISN) (2003). Other positions held by Dr. Tomalia include Distinguished Visiting Scholar (Columbia University), Distinguished Research Scientists/Professor (Central Michigan University), Chairman – External Peer Review Panel for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Nanotechnology White Paper” (2006), Washington, D.C., and as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) (2006). He is listed as the inventor of over 110 U.S. patents and is author/co-author of more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. Over 170 papers are focused in the dendrimer/dendritic polymer field, including a monograph entitled “Dendrimers and Other Dendritic Polymers” (J. Wiley) co-edited with J.M.J. Fréchet (2001). Dr. Tomalia serves as Associate Editor for Nanomedicine (Elsevier) (2006-present), editorial advisory board of Bioconjugate Chemistry (1999-present), and is a founding member of the editorial advisory board for NanoLetters (2000-2004).

Torina, Jim
The University Funds, LLC
Jim Torina is the President and CEO of the Bellevue, Washington based business accelerator and seed-stage venture fund company, The University Funds, LLC, which is focused on the commercialization of research-based innovations from several Western universities and research labs. Jim is known as a serial entrepreneur by all who know him.  His successes have been in multiple industries, including computer software, insurance, real estate, technology marketing, construction, medical devices and software.  

  • 2 times CEO of INC 500 Companies, #161, #454
  • #11 in Fast Company’s That Will Change the World  (2006)
  • 5 times CEO of Puget Sound Business Journal’s 100 fastest growing private companies
  • 2 times Ernst and Young finalist for Entrepreneur of the Year  (2006, 2007)

In addition to starting and managing several successful organizations, Mr. Torina has raised over $50 million in venture capital funds for his companies, including 3 successful road-shows.  He received his degree in Business Management at Washington State University, where he has served as a Trustee since 2007.  Mr. Torina also serves on the Dean’s Advisory Board for the WSU School of Pharmacy and has been an active benefactor and volunteer to the College of Business and Center for Entrepreneurial Studies.

Trancik, Jessika
Jessika Trancik is an Assistant Professor in the Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and has recently been an Omidyar Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute and an adjunct associate research scholar at the Earth Institute, Columbia University. Dr. Trancik received a Ph.D. in solid state physics from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. She has worked for the United Nations as an advisor to developing countries on energy infrastructure design, and as an advisor to venture capital firms and investment banks on energy technology portfolios. Her research focuses on understanding empirical patterns and physical limitations of technological development. She is particularly interested in the possible pathways for designing energy conversion and storage devices with low carbon intensity and low costs. Dr. Trancik's projects use tools from materials science, engineering systems analysis and economics, and range in scope from studying how physical laws or engineering design characteristics (such as unit scale or degrees of freedom) of various technologies affect the rate of technological improvement and the resulting functional forms of performance curves; to determining fundamental limits to performance of nanostructured electrode materials for photovoltaic cell, batteries and fuel cells - and using this knowledge to design new materials for these applications.

Virden, Jud Jr.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Dr. Jud Virden has been at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) since 1991 and currently serves as the Chief Technology Officer. Previously Dr. Virden was Energy Sector Manager for the Energy and Environment Directorate. The energy sector includes more than $100 million of advanced energy research in technology areas for clients that include DOE’s offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, as well as industry. Until October 1, 2007, Dr. Virden was Deputy Associate Laboratory Director for the Energy Science and Technology Directorate and Director of Energy Programs Business Development.  br>Prior to his most recent roles at PNNL, Dr. Virden was responsible for the Laboratory’s transportation programs.  From 1999 to 2002, he was responsible for growing and developing government-sponsored and private research in the areas of advanced lightweight metal forming, fuel reformation, sensor development and advanced exhaust after-treatment devices. Dr. Virden also served a two-year assignment in Flint, Michigan, as a PNNL employee working with General Motors, Ford and Chrysler and the United States Council of Automotive Research. In this assignment, he was responsible for initiating and developing multiple government/industry projects focused on advanced technology development.  Dr. Virden served as co-chair for the 21st Century Truck Partnership National Laboratory Council, which is responsible for developing long-range technology goals for more efficient heavy vehicles. From 1996 to 1999, Dr. Virden was the technical group leader of the Colloids and Materials Design Group in the Materials Resource Unit at PNNL. Dr. Virden has numerous technical publications and presentations.  He has been awarded an R&D 100 Award and a Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for work on the development of non-thermal plasma technology, a Discover Award with Massachusetts Institute of Technology for fuel reformation technologies, and contributed to a Financial Times Global Automotive Award for PNNL’s contributions to Delphi’s development of nonthermal plasma technology for automotive applications.  He holds two U.S. Patents. Before joining PNNL, Dr. Virden worked in the Science Research Laboratory at the 3M Company in St. Paul, Minnesota and was responsible for the development of ordered organic thin films for nonlinear optical applications. He holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering (1991) from the University of Washington and is a current Board Member for the American Council for an Energy-Efficiency Economy.

Vu, Tania
Department of Biomedical Engineering OHSU
Dr. Tania Vu received her Ph.D. degree in visual neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley and completed her postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Francisco, the University of Illinois, Chicago, and Boston University in the areas of nano/microtechnology and neurophysiology. She is a faculty member in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Program in Neuroscience at Oregon Health and Science University, and an adjunct faculty member of the Physics Department at Portland State University. Her research focuses on the development nanotechnologies for advancing fundamental understanding of neural function as well as invention and application of nanotechnologies to clinical diagnostics.

Wall, Brian
Oregon State University
Brian Wall is currently the Director of the Office of Technology Transfer, in the Research Office at Oregon State University. He is actively involved in economic development through facilitating the further development and transfer of university innovations to startups and industrial partners and is the Chair of OSU’s University Venture Fund Advisory Committee. Prior to joining OSU, Brian was employed with SeedStage, LLC, a small investment services firm located in Austin, Texas that worked cooperatively with high net worth individual investors (Angels), venture firms, and corporate investors to introduce them to investment opportunities that match their respective profiles. While there he focused on business model, competitive and trend research, co-authored a venture investing quarterly report, and provided evaluations and feedback on new company presentations.

Wegeng, Bob
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Robert S Wegeng is a Level V Engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory operated by Battelle’s Northwest Division.  Over his 23-year employment with Battelle he has contributed as an engineer, principal investigator and project manager for projects supported by the Federal government, for DARPA, DOD, DOE and NASA.  Mr. Wegeng holds over 100 patents (USA and foreign) for technologies in the areas of energy conversion and chemical/materials processing.  He is one of the original inventors and developers of microchannel process technology and is the co-recipient of two R&D 100 Awards for work in this area.

Weiss, Dirk
Washington Technology Center
Dr. Dirk Weiss currently holds a position of Senior Research Scientist at the Washington Technology center, Seattle. He is leading a DARPA-funded project to investigate commercial applications of alternative nanoscale lithography techniques. The focus of his work lies on solar energy and biological microchip applications. Dr. Weiss’ graduate degrees are in physics from Freie Universität Berlin and materials science from Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research (Stuttgart, Germany). He completed his postdoctoral research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in February 2005, where he developed a new fabrication method for single-electron transistors based on individual metal nanocrystals. He subsequently worked at United Technologies Research Center on nanomaterials for renewable energy technologies.

Wheaton, Chris
EnerG2, Inc.
With a breadth of technology operations experience spanning a variety of industries, Chris Wheaton manages EnerG2’s manufacturing strategy, market development and financial planning efforts and has also led the company’s federal and state grant acquisition programs. Prior to co-founding EnerG2, Wheaton served as VP of North American Operations for Loudcloud, an outsourced services provider for enterprise IT operations.  To finish his work at Loudcloud, Wheaton led the $65 million spinout and successful integration of his division into EDS.  He has also provided product line management for a variety of technology delivery start-ups in industries ranging from telecommunications to medical devices.  Wheaton received a BA from Northwestern University and an MBA from Stanford University.

Williams, Chuck
University of Oregon
Chuck Williams directs the University of Oregon's Office of Technology Transfer and is adjunct faculty at the University of Oregon School of Law.  Prior to joining Oregon. he managed the Digital Ventures licensing office at the University of Washington for five years, with the unit's licensing income exceeding $4 million annually and averaging 3 startup company launches per year.  Chuck was first introduced to technology transfer and innovation management in 1992 at the University of Washington's then Office of Technology Transfer, and he has practiced sports entertainment law and environmental law in addition to his current interest in innovation management and intellectual property strategies.  He holds two bachelor's degrees (molecular biology and botany) from the University of Washington, a master's in biology from the University of Dundee, a Ph.D. in botany from UW and a J.D. from the University of Washington School of Law.

Williams, George
Voxtel
George Williams is the founder and CEO of Voxtel, Inc. Voxtel is a provider of optoelectronic devices using novel semiconductor architectures and nanotechnology-engineered materials, and a leading developer of sophisticated detectors and electro-optical imaging systems for a wide range of government, industrial, and scientific markets.

Williams, Thomas
Umpqua Research Company
Mr. Williams has been a research scientist with Umpqua Research Company for seven years, during which time he has served concurrently as staff microbiologist and project scientist.  His projects have primarily focused on catalyst development with recent emphasis on microreactor based applications.

Wills, Fiona
UW TechTransfer
Dr. Fiona Wills is currently Director of UW TechTransfer, Technology Licensing, having been with UW TechTransfer since 2003. Technology Licensing manages projects leading to patentable inventions, copyright, trademarks and research tools across the University of Washington, and is responsible for outreach, evaluation of technologies, intellectual property project management, intellectual property protection, marketing, negotiating, and post license compliance. UW TechTransfer is focusing efforts on increasing industry, investor, and entrepreneur connections with investigators, and long term investment in projects.  Prior to joining UW TechTransfer, Dr. Wills worked for the business development department of Molecular Probes, Inc., engaged in both in-licensing and out-licensing activities for the research reagent and diagnostic markets, and competitive market analysis. She received her B.Sc. in Biochemistry/Microbiology from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Alberta. 

Yan, Mingdi
Professor of Chemistry, Portland State University
Professor Mingdi Yan obtained her BS degree in Polymer from the University of Science and Technology of China. After receiving her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1994 from the University of Oregon, Professor Yan took a position at Ikonos Corporation where her focus was on developing chemical sensors. In 1998, Professor Yan joined the faculty of the Chemistry department at PSU, and was promoted to Professor in 2008. She was a Guest Professor at the Department of Materials, ETH Zurich (2006-07) and is a member of the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI). Professor Yan’s research focuses on surface and interfaces, which lies at the interface of organic chemistry, materials chemistry, and nanotechnology. Professor Yan’s research laboratory develops new techniques to change surface properties of materials and devices, and synthesize new materials for electronic and biomedical applications.  Technologies developed in Professor Yan’s laboratory have been licensed to a Swiss company generating royalty for the university.  Professor Yan’s professional activities include serving on NIH study sections, as a consultant for several private companies and national labs, and the member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Society of Molecular Imprinting.

Yang, Rosa L.
Innovation at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)
Rosa Yang is Vice President, Innovation at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). She joined EPRI in 1987 as a Project Manager in the Light Water Reactor Fuel Program, focusing her research activities on fuel design, fuel failure investigation, corrosion, and the impact of plant operation on fuel performance. In 1998, Yang established EPRI’s Fuel Reliability Program, with participants from more than 10 countries and 30 nuclear utilities.  As Director of the Materials and Chemistry Department within EPRI’s Nuclear Power Sector, Yang guided research activities designed to enhance scientific understanding of nuclear issues, and to improve the safe, reliable and economic operation of nuclear power reactors. With a multi-disciplined technical staff of more than 50 and a diverse $55M per year research portfolio, she lead research activities in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor materials aging and degradation, water chemistry control, fuel performance and reliability, spent fuel storage, high and low-level waste disposal, and radiation control. Before joining EPRI, Yang worked for General Electric, where she developed the company’s fuel design and licensing code. She also served as the technical lead for several internationally sponsored fuel testing programs. Yang holds a Bachelor of Science in nuclear engineering from the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan, and a Master of Science and doctorate in nuclear engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. Yang is a frequent guest speaker and published author on nuclear fuel and materials technology issues. She has delivered featured presentations at numerous key industry events, including the International Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting, Annual American Nuclear Society Meeting, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Regulatory Information Conference.

Yip, Angus
Soluxra
Angus Yip is the Chief Technical Officer and a founder of Soluxra, a start-up company focused on the manufacture of an inexpensive thin film PV technology. Soluxra’s cling-wrap like film is quoted to be low-cost, lightweight, flexible, and conformable to any substrate.

 

Keynote speakers:
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Dr. James B. Roberto
Dr. James B. Roberto
Director, Strategic Capabilities
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Dr. B. Ray Stults
Dr. B. Ray Stults
Associate Laboratory Director Energy Sciences, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Dr. Donald Tomalia
Dr. Donald Tomalia
Director of the National Dendrimer Center, Central Michigan University

Dr. Jud W. Virden, Jr.
Dr. Jud W. Virden, Jr.
Energy Sector Manager
Energy and Environment Directorate
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Rosa Yang
Rosa Yang
Vice President, Innovation
Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

Solar Materials Symposium speakers:
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Nate Lewis
Nate Lewis
George L. Argyros Professor of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology

Jessika Trancik
Jessika Trancik
Omidyar Fellow, Santa Fe Institute
Assistant Professor, Engineering Systems Division, MIT