Recruitment

Fraternity and sorority recruitment varies depending on the organization and its council. The information below is general, but should you give you a good idea about the recruitment process for each group.

Fraternity Recruitment

Interfraternity Council (IFC)

Unified Greek Council (UGC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (Divine Nine)

Sorority Recruitment

Panhellenic Council (PHC)

Unified Greek Council (UGC) and National Pan-Hellenic Council (Divine Nine)

Things to Know about Joining

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Fall Formal Recruitment?

This describes the structured activity of IFC and Panhellenic. IFC concludes their activities with JUMP and Panhellenic concludes their program with the Introduction to Panhellenic. Please check out the Recruitment Section of this website for details and dates of Fall Formal Recruitment for both fraternities and sororities.

If you are interested in joining a National Pan-hellenic Council (Divine Nine), Multicultural, Service-based, or Academic-based Greek organization, please browse the Chapter Profiles above and use the contact information provided from these organizations.

If I don’t participate in formal recruitment, can I still join a chapter?

Yes. There is Informal Recruitment for IFC and Continuous Open Bidding (COB) for Panhellenic the remainder of the academic year. Please contact the Unified Greek Council or NPHC (Divine Nine) organizations to get specific recruitment information.

Do I have to identify as a student of color to join a culturally based Greek Organization?

No. Greek organizations within the Unified Greek Council and the National Pan-hellenic Council pride themselves by having students from all racial and ethnic backgrounds including, but not limited to, students who identify as White, Caucasian, Latino/a, Chicano/a, Hispanic, Southeast Asian, Asian-American, African American, Black, Native American, bi-racial, multi-racial, mixed race, and all racial and ethnic identities.

What are the best chapters?

The answer to this question is completely subjective. Before joining, a person should look at the academic performance of the chapter, housed or un-housed status, alcohol status, and philanthropic contributions, along with any other qualities deemed important.

Is hazing permitted?

Oregon State University, IFC, UGC, NPHC, and Panhellenic all agree that hazing is unacceptable in the Greek Community. Should hazing be reported, it will be dealt with through the judicial processes of the Greek Community and OSU.

What are the costs of joining a Greek organization?

The Greek Experience is an investment in your student's future. The leadership skills, the academic assistance, and friendships will benefit your student beyond their college days. The perception that fraternities and sororities are only an option for the "rich" students is widespread and false. Greek organizations are quite affordable and fees go to services that will positively impact your student. To assist members, chapters may offer scholarships and grants. The cost to join will vary from chapter to chapter. There are three kinds of costs: one time costs (pledge & initiation fees), recurring costs (membership dues, room and board rates) and special costs (tee shirts, social functions, etc). Ask the various chapters specific questions about each area. You may also refer to the "Financial Information" section of this website for cost information on the various fraternities/sororities. We encourage all interested students to ask for financial information prior to joining.

What will students get out of Greek Life that they would not get out of any other college organization?

Coming to college is one of the major life changes that your student will go through. Joining a fraternity or sorority can help make the transition easier. Developing life-long friendships with the members in their chapter helps make the campus smaller. For many members, these chapters become a home away from home. In addition to the brother/sisterhood, every chapter promotes the values of enhancing leadership, scholarship, philanthropy/service, and financial responsibility in their members.

Will my student's academics be compromised if they join a Greek chapter?

Academics are a priority in the Greek Community. When students join, they become part of a larger group of students who value their academic goals at OSU. This group understands what the new member is facing and can provide support in many areas. Each chapter on campus has a scholarship officer who initiates programs within the chapter to encourage high academic achievement. There are various resources for members on campus such as time managment workshops, academic advisors, the career center, etc. Specific academic information about the chapters may be found elsewhere on this website under "Academic Achievement".

What is expected of an associate member or prospective member?

The number one priority is to achieve academically. Secondly, associate members are expected to learn the local chapter history and national history as well as to get to know the current membership. The length of the associate membership period varies from chapter to chapter.

How much time does a chapter take up?

The time commitment varies from chapter to chapter but the first semester is the most time intensive as the new member goes through the chapter's education program. The time spent in this program will give your student the opportunity to develop their leadership and time management skills, learn about the history of the organization, develop friendships, and allow them to become involved with other organizations. After the initiation into the chapter, expectations will vary. Each chapter has weekly chapter meetings and other mandatory events (philanthropies, service, and initiation) throughout the year, but they are planned well in advance. In addition to the weekly meeting, the more your student puts into the chapter, the more they will get out of being a member.

What is a Philanthropy or Service Project?

Greek members take it as part of their mission to support their national philanthropies (not-for-profit causes) financially and physically. Throughout the year, each chapter spends time fundraising and volunteering to help their particular philanthropy. The time spent together on these events is one of the many times that fraternity brothers and sisters can bond, while making a difference in someone's life.

Are fraternities/sororities primarily social in nature?

There is a social aspect to the Greek Community and these "social" events include education programs/workshops, community service events, intramural sports, Dad's Weekend, Mom's Weekend, Homecoming, and dinner exchanges in addition to parties and socials. Today's Greek Communities across the nation have adopted a stringent approach to socializing thereby creating a safer, more beneficial environment for members. Each governing council has a risk managment and alcohol policy. In addition, each organization may have national rules to follow regarding the hosting of social events. All organizations sponsor education on alcohol misuse and abuse. Housed sororities do not permit alcohol in their facilities.

What are the roles of my parents?

Your parents can take the time to find out more about the Greek Community at OSU. Ask questions about what each organization will offer your student and allow them to make the best decision for themselves. Check out any information your student gets in the mail over the summer related to Greek Life. Once your student joins a Greek organization, there will be opportunities for your involvement as a parent such as Mom's and Dad's Weekend activities, or joining the chapter's Mom's Club, etc.

How do I get involved?

Your student may receive information about Recruitment in the mail. Please browse the different fraternity and sorority chapters pages to get a feel for which organization you would like to join. At the START sessions, there will be an interest session on Greek Life for students and parents. Check out the websites listed above. Recruitment and Membership Intake are mutual selection processes with the hope there is a place for everyone.

Questions for Students to Ask Prior to Joining

This is a list of questions that potential student members should ask the fraternity or sorority that they are looking at joining.

  • Does your Greek organization have a house or any live-in requirements?
  • Do I want to live in a fraternity or sorority house? (many OSU fraternities and sororities do not have houses, for example: NPHC and UGC Greeks)
  • What can your fraternity/sorority offer a student?
  • How does your chapter perform academically?
  • What type of Scholarship Program do you have to help a student with grades?
  • What types of leadership opportunities do you offer?
  • What are the grade requirements for intiation into membership?
  • What are the other requirements for initiation into membership?
  • Do you have a system of fines?
  • Are there "house meetings" held at the chapter?
  • Is the Associate Member allowed in meetings for house policy decisions?
  • What are the majors of your members?
  • Are your alumni active in the chapter?
  • Do you have a "big brother/big sister" program?
  • What are the costs (all costs) involved in joining your organization?
  • How many members live in your chapter house?
  • What are the living arrangements?
  • Where would I sleep?
  • Where would I study?
  • Do you have quiet hours?
  • What are the costs of living (Room & Board) in your chapter house (if it has a house)?
  • Do you permit hazing? Do you have a difficult Associate Member program?
  • Do you have an open kitchen (can I have a snack when I'm hungry)?
  • Do you have a good cook? Are meals nutritious? How many meals are offered per week?
  • What are the costs (what do they cover) of being a member but not living in the chapter house?
  • What is expected of an Associate Member?
  • What things happen during the Associate Member period?
  • When can I move in?
  • Is there a set length of time that I must live in?
  • Are there regularly scheduled study hours for associates? members?
  • Are your brothers/sisters active on campus? How?
  • Is you chapter active on campus? How?
  • What philanthropies does your chapter support?
  • What are your chapter's philanthropical activities to give that support?
  • What makes your chapter unique and sets it apart from other chapters?
  • What are some of your social activities?
  • How much emphasis does your chapter place on intramural sports?
  • What type of Community Service does your chapter participate in?
  • What are the advantages of living in the chapter house as opposed to living out?
  • How much time commitment is expected?

Values of Fraternity and Sorority Members

Things You Should Learn as a New Member:

  • The PURPOSE of your organization.
  • The VALUES of your organization.
  • Which ACTIVES are committed to living 1 and 2.
  • How to chair a house committee.
  • How to work with alumni.
  • The HISTORY of your organization.
  • Who your personal ROLE MODELS are & why.
  • How to successfully recruit.
  • RESPECT IS A GIFT WE ALL MUST EARN.
  • How to properly use the LIBRARY/CAREER SERVICES/THE ALUMNI CENTER & THE GREEK COORDINATOR’S OFFICE.
  • How to SING and know WHY we sing.
  • How to lead an event that satisfies risk management needs.
  • How to resolve conflict without violence or shouting.
  • How to speak in public.
  • What the seven rules of writing are and how they can help you get a better job.
  • How to confront a member who is not meeting their obligations.
  • That it is up to you to make your chapter stronger.
  • How to facilitate positive change in your life, your chapter and your world.
  • The only tradition is the tradition of the rituals.
  • Everything/everyone can be improved with time and love.
  • LOVE is what FRATERNITY/SORORITY means.
  • The chapter needs you more than you need the chapter.
  • The name and contact person of your National Office. You should call or write them at least twice before initiation.
  • All pre-initiation activity should be of a reflective nature. There is no need for fear/intimidation/physical activity or sleep deprivation.
  • Membership is a journey, not a destination. The real work starts after initiation.
  • There is NO SUCH STATUS AS JUNIOR ACTIVE OR ANY OTHER FORM OF SECONDARY STATUS. ONCE INITIATED, YOU ARE ENTITLED TO FULL AND IMMEDIATE PRIVILEGES. IF NOT – CALL YOUR HEADQUARTERS TO CONFIRM THE REALITY.
  • THERE ARE ACTIVES WHO ARE NOT GOOD MEMBERS. LEARN WHO THEY ARE AND AVOID THEM.
  • IF YOU ARE UNDERAGE AND DRINK AT A CHAPTER EVENT, YOU HAVE PLACED THE LIFE OF YOUR CHAPTER IN JEOPARDY. ANY ACTIVE WHO OFFERS OR ENCOURAGES YOU TO DRINK HAS ABANDONED YOUR CHAPTER’S RITUAL AND BELIEFS.
  • Always know how to find the centers of influence in a group.
  • How to participate in Semester at Sea, etc., and then go.
  • How to discover the fear that is the underlying source of all anger and hatred.
  • Learn how to disapprove of the behavior, not the individual.
  • Uncover your special gift and then nurture it and share it.
  • CONTROL IS AN ABSOLUTE ILLUSION !!!!!!!!!!!!
  • BY-LAWS NEVER OVERRIDE THE RITUAL.
    • STATE LAW
    • UNIVERSITY POLICY
    • REASON
  • Your job is to find people better than you and get them in your chapter. Always remember that and never treat them with anything short of love, devotion and respect.
  • If alumni come over to drink and tell war stories – learn how to ask them to help you with your career over a cup of coffee.
  • Never trust anything anyone tells you once they have had a sip of alcohol or any mind-altering substance (pot/cocaine/etc.)
  • If men – you should learn how to shop and cook; If women – you should learn how to fix a flat and basic car repair costs.
  • How to dance the Tango/Waltz/Flamenco.
  • How to establish and keep good credit.
  • How to buy a house/life insurance/diamonds/business.
  • How to invest in the stock market/commodities.
  • Meet the University President, City Mayor, etc.

ALL TRUE FRATERNITY & SORORITY PEOPLE:

  • Cut no more than one class a week.
  • Earn a 3.0 GPA.
  • Know the meaning of their name.
  • Have a mission/purpose in life.
  • Have written goals they keep with them.
  • Commit random acts of kindness.
  • Remove their hat for ritual and class.
  • Have a list of 100 goals for their lives.
  • Have an adult mentor.
  • Always play fairly and cleanly.
  • Respect all Greek chapters and their members.
  • Have a job before graduation.
  • Help clean their chapter house, pay their bills on time, serve on committees, and have constant interaction with alumni their entire time in the undergraduate chapter.
  • Practice sober/safe sex 100% of the time.
  • Always look for the good in others.
  • Always help new members without raising their voice or requiring foolish acts.
  • Lead by example.
  • Seek solutions as opposed to finding someone to blame.
  • Always praise publicly and reprimand privately.
  • Always tell the truth.
  • Obey their oath of membership and require it of all who belong to their chapter.
  • Practice “team” on a daily basis.
  • Stand up for what is right, not what is popular.
  • Understand the true benefits of membership come after college.
  • Are good citizens and uphold the law.
  • Are proactively humble, patient and loving.

TEN REASONS FACULTY MEMBERS HATE “US”

  • We wear hats to class.
  • We don’t take showers before we come to class.
  • The only day we choose to wear our fraternity sportswear is on the above-mentioned days. And when we make the choice to make t-shirts or party favors, the ones we wear are very alcohol-centered and/or sexist, racist, and homophobic.
  • We typically are not prepared for class because the social and/or intramural calendar does not allow us ample time for studying.
  • We fall asleep in class. (Especially the pledges that we have kept up all night the night before, but then demand that they wear their letters.)
  • The only things they read about us are in Newsweek, the campus newspaper, and/or the stalls in the restrooms.
  • We don’t attend class regularly.
  • We ask if we missed anything important on the days we skip class.
  • We don’t have any toes because we have shot ourselves in the foot so many times.
  • Bottom line – we are not delivering on what our founders said were the important things of fraternity and the faculty are going to hold us accountable until we do.

M. Hayes, 1995
AFA President
Director of Alumni Affairs
Indiana State University

FOR IT IS WRITTEN:

Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. - H. G. Wells

All that is valuable in human society depends upon the opportunity for development afforded an individual. - Albert Einstein

No great idea ever entered the human mind through an open mouth. - Unknown

73% of injuries resulting in lawsuits happen in Greek houses.
59% brought by members.
90% of fights, sexual assaults, etc., involve alcohol.
88% of all injuries involve alcohol.
81% of all paralyses involve alcohol.
78% of all psychological damage involves alcohol.
66% of all serious injuries involve alcohol.
ALL ARE MINORS - as reported by HARRIS & HARRIS