Oregon State University

College of Agricultural Science

APAA - Assessment

  1. Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    1. Agricultural Business Management or, and Management (ABM) Learning Outcomes (adopted 6/11)

      Students will be able to demonstrate in exams or work samples the ability to:

      • Explain microeconomic theory at the intermediate level, including producer theory, consumer theory, how markets work and prices are formulated, market failure and its causes, and welfare theory.
      • Explain macroeconomic theory at the principles level, including national income accounting, savings versus consumption, how interest rates are formed, government spending and its impact on the economy, and how government is financed.
      • Perform basic algebra and introductory calculus operations in the context of applied economic analysis and optimization.
      • Analyze and evaluate agribusiness problems and management decisions employing commonly used business software (such as MSExcel, AgTools and/or FINPACK, or other programs commonly used in the business and finance industries) utilizing various forms of capital and cash-flow budgeting, as well as historic and pro forma firm financial statements.
      • Utilize and apply regression and other statistical methods to analyze commodity markets and economic data.
      • Formulate marketing plans and strategies for both generic commodities and specialized products.
      • Clearly communicate the analysis and planning of agribusiness decision making in both oral and written form, using word processing and presentation software.
      • Explain how external forces such as law, environmental regulation and government policies impact agribusiness decision making.
    2. Environmental Economics, Policy (EEP) Learning Outcomes (adopted 6/11)

      Students graduating with an EEP degree will be able to:

      • Explain microeconomic theory at the intermediate level, including producer theory, consumer theory, how markets work and prices are formulated, market failure and its causes, and welfare theory.
      • Explain macroeconomic theory at the principles level, including national income accounting, savings versus consumption, how interest rates are formed, government spending and its impact on the economy, and how government is financed.
      • Analyze natural resource and environmental management issues, including the management of specific resources (such as fishery, forests, land and water), by applying economic theory and tools such as:
      • Efficiency concepts and other criteria for evaluating environmental and resource management and policy
      • Externalities and imperfect market structures, and
      • Basic policy instruments to control externalities (including taxes, standards, subsidies, liability rules, and voluntary approaches)
      • Perform basic algebra and introductory calculus operations in the context of applied economic analysis.
      • Apply statistics and regression techniques to economic data and models and evaluate results.
      • Demonstrate computer skills needed to analyze economic issues and communicate results of the analysis.
      • Communicate the process and results of economic analysis of environmental and natural resource issues through a variety of oral and written methods.
      • Explain the legal system in the United States, particularly as it applies to environmental issues and natural resource use. Explain the linkages between local and global environmental and natural resource issues and policy.
      • Please note that the graduate program learning outcomes are under development by the Applied Economics grad program
  2. Department of Agricultural Education and General Agriculture

    Graduates of the general agriculture program will have:

    • A broad-based agricultural knowledge
    • This knowledge will provide the graduate with a fundamental understanding of the agricultural industry and practical agricultural production management in the areas of: plant science, animal science, agricultural economics, agricultural systems technology
    • Practical and functional understanding of today’s technical society o This understanding will insure that graduates are literate in the following areas: biological and physical sciences, mathematical and computation skills, computer and program operations
    • Ability to live and work in a global society
    • Graduates will have developed personal growth, leadership, and career skills and an understanding beyond agriculture.
    • Ability to make decisions based on knowledge
    • This includes an appreciation of knowledge, life-long learning, and a practical application in agriculture
    • Ability to communicate effectively
    • Graduates will able to communicate effectively in both written and verbal English
    • Specialized programs
    • Flexibility in the program will allow each graduate to concentrate on a specific area appropriate for his/her goals and aspirations.
    • Ability to gain employment

    The knowledge and skills appropriate for employment at a technical or practitioner level in the agricultural industry. Graduates will understand basic principles of agricultural systems and technology, become effective as leaders and members of groups, understand sound managerial principles to maintain economic efficiency and agricultural sustainability in an agricultural business setting.

  3. Department of Animal Sciences

    • Students will be able to recall, integrate, and apply essential core information about the key components of Animal Sciences (Animal Biology, Nutrition, Genetics, Physiology, Behavior, Production, and Ethics).
    • Students will effectively communicate ideas orally, graphically, and in writing.
    • Students will be able to use quantitative tools to analyze and propose evidence based solutions to Animal Production issues.
  4. Department of Bio Resource Research Interdisciplinary Major

    Students completing a degree in BioResource Research will be able to:

    • Understand the scientific method, including acquisition and integration of knowledge through observation and experimentation, the use of evidence, and hypothesis testing.
    • Design an experiment, and collect and analyze data.
    • Interpret and effectively present research data.
    • Competently convey the meaning of research results in written and oral format, and demonstrate the ability to communicate with both professionals and the general public.
    • Demonstrate competency in their specific disciplines, and master and discuss the most important contemporary issues.
    • Think critically and creatively to solve problems.
    • Demonstrate a strong work ethic and the ability to contribute to a team.
  5. Department of Botany and Plant Pathology

    1.  Botany-specific knowledge and skills:
      • Acquire, articulate and retain specialized language and knowledge relevant to Botany, including its main subfields, its ties to other sciences and its contemporary issues and problems.
      • Predict, assess and articulate the importance of plants in their interaction with other organisms or their environments.
      • Acquire and demonstrate competency in routine and specialized laboratory skills applicable to botanical research.
      • Demonstrate ability to analyze experimental measurements relevant to Botany and accurately report observations and analysis.
    2. General knowledge and skills:
      • Communicate scientific concepts, experimental results and analytical arguments clearly and concisely verbally and in writing.
      • Access information through traditional and new technologies and use this information in synthesis and problem solving activities.
      • Critically analyze and evaluate information from multiple sources and perspectives
      • Understand and use the processes of scientific inquiry, scientific method and hypothesis formulation and testing.
      • Understand the relationship of Botany to other areas of science and to society in general.
  6. Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

     

  7. Department of Food Science & Technology

    Students graduating with a Bachelor of Science. in Food Science and Technology will be able to:

    • effectively express themselves orally, graphically, and in writing
    • apply scientific principles to solve problems in Food Science
    • identify and explain essential foundational principles in Food Science
    • engage in activities that enhance their professional development

    Additionally, as a program approved by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), we document that our students meet 44 specific learning outcomes associated with 28 core competencies established by IFT Higher Education Review Board. These outcomes are specified and mapped to specific FST courses in the attached report to the IFT.

  8. Horticulture

    As students progress through the Horticulture curriculum they will:

    • Find, interpret, integrate, and communicate data and theory from horticultural systems and sciences, and related disciplines
    • Assess horticulture systems, diagnose horticulture problems and recommend solutions, and create novel systems based on data and theory from horticultural sciences and related disciplines
    • Comprehend and demonstrate how horticultural sciences integrate with contemporary social, economic, political and environmental issues
    • demonstrate proficiency in oral and written communication

    Note: As our classes and programs grow and change to keep pace with contemporary Horticulture issues, our Curriculum Committee continually visits and refines our departmental learning objectives. Next year, as the curriculum changes with a new College and School structure, new learning outcomes will be created for the general major in Integrated Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences.

  9. Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management

    Students will be able to:

    • Students will be able to recall, integrate, and apply essential core information about the key components of Rangeland Sciences:
      • major rangeland types and their key ecological characteristics.
      • basic plants-animal interactions.
      • management practices relative to ecological and economic productivity and influence on ecosystem products and services.
      • historical background of range management.
      • Students will effectively communicate ideas orally, graphically, and in writing.
      • Students will be able to use quantitative tools to analyze and propose evidence based solutions to Rangeland ecology and management issues.

Contact Info

APAA
500 Kerr Admin. Bldg
Corvallis, OR 97331
Ph: 541-737-7463 | Fax: 541-737-8082

APAA Staff
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