Oregon State University

Built Environment Accessibility Best Practices

Oregon State University has adopted "Best Practices" for the design and construction of our facilities. These best practices have been incorporated into the Facilities Services Construction Standards (updated June, 2012) that every project is required to follow. They are broken down into three "parts" and many sections, to follow current building code practice for creating code documents such as those followed by the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.

The materials provided below are not intended to and do not create rights independent of those under existing legal requirements; rather, they are intended as a guide to assist the University in complying with existing legal obligations and in achieving the University's goal of creating accessible, inclusive educational and work environments.

Part 1 - Purpose

In the pursuit of becoming a fully accessible university, Oregon State University expects all Consultants and service providers to design to 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design and the Oregon Structural Specialty Code (OSSC) and to exhibit a commitment to employing Universal Design Principles in their service and product delivery. Consultants will engage with project representatives on how Universal Design Principles will enhance accessibility that will meet a variety of needs and create a university that is accessible to everyone. Designers will ensure that the principles of Universal Design are considered to the project representative’s satisfaction.

Part 2 - Design Process and Review Requirements

1. Accessibility Considerations and Review in Project Design

  1. The Corvallis campus Accessible University Advisory Committee (AUAC) is charged with developing and overseeing the implementation of a comprehensive plan for improving the accessibility of OSU’s built environment. AUAC shall be consulted if any of the following conditions exist:
    1. OSU Accessibility Best Practices cannot be strictly adhered to because of conditions beyond the control of the designer.
    2. An element of the project requires further interpretation of the OSU Accessibility Best Practices or further discussion to determine the most appropriate solution.
    3. Adhering to the OSU Accessibility Best Practices is in conflict with the requirements of the Historic Review Committee.
    4. The designer believes an alternative solution meets or exceeds the functionality of the OSU Accessibility Best Practices.
    5. An element of the project will impact accessibility and the OSU Accessibility Best Practices does not address the issue.

2. Accessible Design Workshop

  1. For all New Construction and Major Renovation projects, design teams (including architect/engineer, consultants, Facilities Services Project Manager and Construction Manager assigned to the project, and project “owner”) will engage in an “Accessibility Design Workshop” to identify issues related to the specific project and to explore innovative approaches to accessibility. The following should be discussed:
    1. Specific accessibility issues related to the project.
    2. Opportunities for innovative solutions to provide a fully accessible facility.
    3. How accessibility issues will be addressed and how the innovative solutions discussed above can be integrated into the design.

3. Design Review and Recommendations by AUAC

  1. All new construction and renovation projects shall be presented to AUAC in the form of a “facilitated review” during the final stages of Schematic Design and in the Construction Document stage. The review will be facilitated by the Facilities Services Project Manager (and design professional, at the discretion of the Project Manager) and will include the following:
    1. Incorporation of the requirements of the OSU Accessibility Best Practices.
    2. Compliance with the Oregon Structural Specialty Code, 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design, and other applicable codes related to accessibility.
    3. Incorporation of Universal Design principles.
    4. Incorporation of concepts and design solutions resulting from Accessible Design Workshop.

4. Third-Party Review

  1. A third-party accessibility review shall be conducted on all new building construction and major renovation projects. A consultant shall be contracted to provide the following services:
    1. Review drawings and specifications for accessibility at the schematic design phase.
    2. Review drawings and specifications at the construction document phase for accessibility.
    3. After each of the two phases of review, the consultant will provide OSU and the design team with input related to elements depicted on the documents that appear to be out of compliance and provide suggestions on how to improve accessibility.
    4. As a project approaches substantial completion, the consultant shall perform an on-site accessibility evaluation of the project to verify that all accessibility-related elements have been constructed as per the drawings and specifications. Any elements that are non-compliant shall be added to the punchlist of items to be corrected.

Part 3 - Design Elements

1. Applicable Code, Guidelines and Standards

All design work shall comply with all applicable sections of the following (or latest upgrades, as applicable):

  1. 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design
  2. 2010 Edition of the Oregon Structural Specialty Code (OSSC) (as amended – effective March 1, 2012)
  3. ICC/ANSI A117.1 – 2009 Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities (Referenced by OSCC)
  4. Proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way
  5. 2011 Oregon Elevator Specialty Code
  6. ASME A17.1 – 2010 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators
  7. ORS 447.233 - Oregon Transportation Commission Standards for Accessible Parking Spaces (April, 2008)
  8. ORS 447.220 - It is the purpose of (state law) to make affected buildings, including but not limited to, commercial facilities, public accommodations, private entities, private membership clubs and churches in the state accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities, as provided in the Americans with Disabilities Act, and to make covered multifamily dwellings in the state accessible to and usable by all persons with disabilities, as provided in the Fair Housing Act.
  9. Oregon State University Classroom Furniture Standards.

2. References

  1. The Principles of Universal Design – The Center for Accessible Design (NC State University – 1997)
  2. Access for Everyone – Dr. Arvid E Osterberg (Iowa State University - 2010)
  3. Signs and the ABA/ADA – Sharon Toji (2010)
  4. Equal Access: Universal Design of Physical Spaces – Sheryl Burgstahler, Ph.D. (University of Washington – 2009)
  5. Campus Pedestrian Facilities: ADA Assessment and Survey (includes recommended performance standards (p.29-30.)-SZS Consulting Group

3. Alterations to Existing Buildings

  1. All of the accessibility construction standards, contained herein, shall apply to existing buildings undergoing alterations unless technically infeasible.
  2. The technical infeasibility of alterations shall be jointly determined by OSU’s Project Manager and the designer in consultation with the Office of Equity and Inclusion. The Office of Equity and Inclusion has final authority in determining “technical infeasibility”.
  3. At a minimum, the alterations must include an accessible route connecting all functional areas in the building to nearby accessible parking and pedestrian routes.
  4. At least 25% of the alteration cost must be spent on accessibility improvements.  (ADA requires 20%, but OSSC requires 25%)
  5. The accessibility improvements shall be prioritized as follows:
    1. Parking.
    2. Accessible entrance.
    3. Accessible route to the altered area.
    4. At least one accessible restroom for each sex or a single unisex restroom.
    5. Accessible telephones.
    6. Accessible drinking fountains.
    7. Additional accessible elements.
  6. Exceptions: the following types of projects are exempt from the 25% requirement.
    1. Alterations limited solely to window, hardware, operating controls, and signs.
    2. Alterations limited solely to improvements to electrical, mechanical, and/or fire protection systems.
    3. The abatement of hazardous materials.
    4. Alterations that are accessibility improvement projects.

4. Buildings within the OSU Historic District

  1. All of the accessibility construction standards shall apply to any buildings located within the Oregon State University Historic District in Corvallis undergoing alterations, unless technically infeasible. This is in addition to the requirements listed above in the section Alterations to Existing Buildings.
  2. Where compliance would threaten or destroy the historic significance of a building as determined by the City of Corvallis Historic Resources Commission, alternative solutions must be implemented to ensure accessibility.
  3. Alternative solutions shall be provided to the OSU’s satisfaction. Decisions on alternative solutions must include and be approved by the Office of Equity and Inclusion.
  4. Where the alteration to existing restrooms would adversely affect the historic significance of a building, at least one fully accessible family or assisted-use toilet room shall be provided.

5. Design Specifications

The following design specifications should be incorporated into all new construction. In alteration work, these specifications should be utilized to the greatest extent feasible.

  1. Building Blocks
    1. Floor and Ground Surfaces
      1. Use hard or resilient flooring in high traffic, general university areas such as lobbies, corridors, restrooms, and other common areas along all accessible routes.
      2. Carpet should only be used in areas where it isn’t a part of an accessible route or in areas where acoustics is a concern, such as in residence halls.
      3. Where carpet is used, use, only short-pile carpet.
      4. At entrances to buildings, provide recessed walk-off mats that are flush with the adjoining floor surface.
      5. Pavers or stamped concrete should not be used on accessible paths of travel. Pavers may be used in other areas, but must be set in mortar on a concrete slab and have flush joints. Stamped concrete, if used, should not have joints larger than 1/8” wide.
    2. Turning Space
      1. Provide elongated circle minimum turning space (60” x 78”). (ADA allows 60” radius or T-shaped turning area)
      2. Only use 60 radius and T-shaped turning space in alterations where space for the elongated circle is not available.
    3. Floor and Ground Clear Areas
      1. Provide clear floor areas with minimum dimensions of 36” x 54”. (ADA allows 30” x 48”)
    4. Knee Space
      1. Provide 30” minimum knee space under tables and counters, wherever possible. It is acknowledged that this amount of knee space is not available with lavatories due to lavatory bowls and plumbing.  (ADA allows 27” minimum.)
    5. Reach Ranges
      1. Provide all controls for building occupants between 18” and 43” above the floor. (ADA allows 15” to 48” or up to 44” over counters up to 25” deep.)
      2. Controls and objects shall be placed at least 18 inches away from inside corners of walls to allow for wheelchair access.
      3. Locate outlets and other objects that are normally closer to the floor at a consistent height of 18 inches above the floor measured to the centerline of the outlet or object. (ADA allows outlets to be located as low as 15”.)
  2. Exterior Accessible Routes
    1. Paths of Travel
      1. All projects must consider connections from the project site to accessible parking as well as to accessible routes of travel that connect the building to the rest of campus to ensure that we are creating an integrated campus.
      2. Where an accessible route intersects with multiple routes where one or more are not accessible, provide signage directing people to the accessible route.
      3. When an accessible route of travel needs to be closed for construction purposes, the designer shall direct the contractor to either provide an alternate accessible route or provide signage that directs people to the nearest accessible route.
      4. Minimum walkway width: 60” (ADA minimum is 36”.)
      5. Design accessible exterior routes without ramps whenever possible.
      6. Whenever possible, locate items such as cleanouts, vault covers, grates, and similar items outside of the path of travel. When these items are located within the path of travel, they shall be flush with the surrounding walk.
      7. For exterior routes, choose alternatives to ramps (such as sidewalks and proper grading) to achieve gentler slopes.
      8. Maximum running slope: 1:25 (ADA allows up to 1:20.)
      9. Note: 1:25 slope cannot always be met due to existing conditions and grades. Grades up to 1:20 are allowable where existing conditions prevent lesser grades.
      10. Where design slopes on walks approach 5% due to existing conditions, consider the incorporation of a ramp or ramps to provide reduced slopes along the majority of the route. Ramps may be preferred over long stretches of walks (over 50') at maximum allowable grade.
      11. On accessible routes with slopes greater than 4%, landings shall be provided at least every 50'.
      12. Where possible, provide benches or other seating elements at landings.
      13. Maximum cross slope: 1.5% (ADA allows 1:48 or just over 2%.) This is to ensure that, with construction tolerances, the resulting slope will be less than 2%.
      14. Provide minimum of 12” along edges of walks that are flush with walk or provide edge protection.
    2. Exterior Ramps
      1. When a ramp is necessary, design the ramp slope between 1:20 and 1:16. Strive for the least amount of slope that is feasible. (ADA allows 1:12 maximum slope for ramps.)
      2. Individual sections of ramps shall not be longer than 25' without a level landing.
      3. Install handrails at 36” above ramp surface. (ADA allows 34” – 38”.) Also, include handrail at 26” in locations used primarily or frequently by children.
      4. Avoid curved ramps.
      5. Where possible, provide a minimum 60” x 72“ area at top, bottom, and intermediate landings.
      6. The cross slope of ramps and landings shall be 1.5%. (ADA allows up to 2%.) This is to ensure that, with construction tolerances, the resulting slope will be less than 2%.
      7. Provide continuous handrails around the perimeter of intermediate landings.
      8. The minimum widths required for all ramps and landings are to be the dimensions between handrails.
      9. When using steel pipe or tubing, provide minimum wall thickness of .140”.
      10. Round handrails are preferred.
    3. Exterior Stairs
      1. Do not design single stair conditions.
      2. Ensure that the leading edge of treads contrasts with the rest of the treads to increase visibility and safety where appropriate. Provide contrasting strip on the leading edge of the tread that extends a total of 2” back from the leading edge of each tread.
      3. Slope treads of exterior stairs 1.5% slope toward the leading edge of the treads. This is to ensure that, with construction tolerances, the resulting slope will be less than 2%.
      4. Install handrails at 36” above nosings. (ADA allows 34” – 38”.) Also, include handrail at 26” in locations used primarily or frequently by children.
      5. OSSC requires that there be handrails within 30” of any portion of a stair that is determined to be an egress route. On exterior stairs that are not part of an egress route, provide intermediate handrail(s) evenly spaced in increments not exceeding 8’.
      6. Provide continuous handrails around the perimeter of intermediate landings.
      7. When using steel pipe or tubing, provide minimum wall thickness of .140”.
      8. Round handrails are preferred.
      9. Provide horizontal handrail extension providing the extension does not protrude into an accessible route.
  3. General Site Elements
    1. Parking
      1. See Oregon Transportation Commission’s (OTC) Standards for Accessible Parking Places. The following shall be supplemental to the OTC standards. Where conflicts exist, the following standards shall prevail.
      2. Parking stalls shall be designed to be 9’ wide by 18’-6” deep. (ADA allows 8’ wide stalls.)
      3. Standard access aisles shall be a minimum of 6’ wide (ADA allows minimum of 5’.)
      4. Access aisles adjacent to van accessible or wheelchair accessible spaces shall be a minimum of 8’ wide (ADA allows 8’ access aisle with 8’ wide parking space or 5’ access aisle with 11’ wide parking space; OSSC requires minimum of 17’ overall.)
      5. Both parking spaces and access aisles should be designed with a cross slope of 1.5%. This is to ensure that, with construction tolerances, the resulting slope will be less than 2% and still provide enough slope for drainage.
      6. The specifications or drawing notes should clearly state that any accessible parking spaces or access aisle slopes that exceed 2% shall be replaced at the contractor’s expense.
      7. All accessible parking spaces and access aisles shall be constructed with concrete to allow for better control of slopes during construction.
      8. Parking spaces should be designed to avoid the use of wheel stops, where feasible. Wheel stops can be a tripping hazard. Adjoining walks should be designed to be wide enough so that vehicles overhanging the walk do not impede the accessible route.
      9. Curb ramps serving accessible parking spaces shall not receive detectable warnings. (The current OTC Standards for Accessible Parking Spaces still show detectable warning.)
      10. Accessible routes from parking access aisles should not cross behind vehicles or go into vehicular traffic. In those cases where it is not technically feasible or reasonable to separate access route from vehicular traffic, then the accessible routes shall be clearly marked as an accessible pedestrian crossings.
      11. Accessible parking signage should not be located within a pedestrian way unless location elsewhere would place the sign too far from the accessible parking space. When it becomes necessary to install an accessible parking sign in a pedestrian way, the bottom of the sign should be at 84”.
      12. Parking meters: coin slots or credit card swipes for accessible parking spaces or pay stations that serve accessible parking spaces shall be located at a maximum height of 43”.
    2. Accessible Parallel Parking Spaces (Passenger Loading Zones, similar)
      1. Accessible parallel parking spaces are not the preferred type of accessible parking space, but may be the only option for providing accessible parking near a facility.
      2. When provided, provide 8’ wide by 19’ long parking space with a 5’ wide access aisle.
      3. Provide accessible parking signage adjacent to the parking space from 4 feet behind the front of the parking space, angled toward the street.
    3. Curb Ramps
      1. Provide curb ramps where accessible routes cross curbs and where blended transitions are not provided.
      2. Unless limited by existing conditions, provide maximum slope of 1:14 on ramp and flared surfaces.
      3. Provide minimum 4’ x 4’ landing at sidewalk at top of curb ramp. Maximum slope on landings to be 1.5%.
      4. Minimize the slope at the landing at bottom of the curb ramp to the greatest extent possible. Consider going to a blended transition at intersections where the crown of the existing street creates excessive slope at the gutter line.
      5. Do not paint curb ramp surfaces.
      6. Provide safety yellow detectable warning on all curb ramps that lead to a vehicular crossing. In general, driveways are excluded unless it is determined that the anticipated volume of traffic entering or exiting a driveway warrants detectable warning.
    4. Site Furnishings
      1. Where benches are provided, provide at least one fully accessible bench in each grouping of benches. Where multiple benches are provided, provide at least one accessible bench for each five benches in a grouping or portion thereof.
      2. Provide companion seating adjacent to a minimum of 50% of all benches.
      3. Where picnic tables are provided, provide at least one accessible picnic table in each grouping of picnic tables. Where multiple picnic tables are provided, provide at least one accessible picnic table for each five picnic tables in a grouping or portion thereof.
  4. Interior Accessible Routes
    1. Accessible Routes
      1. Minimum width: 60” (ADA minimum is 36”.)
      2. Design accessible routes without ramps whenever possible.
      3. Elevators are preferred over ramps wherever level changes greater than three vertical feet are necessary.
      4. Avoid the use of vertical platform lifts in new construction. In existing buildings, vertical platform lifts may be an option for making an area accessible, but should always be the last resort.
      5. Ensure that the lighting levels on ramps and stairs are at least equivalent to the lighting levels in adjacent areas.
    2. Interior Ramps
      1. When a ramp is necessary, design the ramp slope between 1:20 and 1:16. (ADA allows 1:12 maximum slope for ramps)
      2. Install handrails at 36” above ramp surface. (ADA allows 34” – 38”) Also, include handrail at 26” in locations used primarily or frequently by children.
      3. Avoid curved ramps.
      4. Where possible, provide a minimum 60” x 72“ area at top, bottom, and intermediate landings.
      5. Provide continuous handrails around the perimeter of landings.
      6. When using steel pipe or tubing, provide minimum wall thickness of .140”.
      7. Round handrails are preferred.
    3. Interior Stairs
      1. Do not design single stair condition.
      2. Ensure that the leading edge of treads contrasts with the rest of the treads to increase visibility and safety where appropriate. Provide contrasting strip on the leading edge of the tread that extends a total of 2” back from the leading edge of each tread.
      3. Install handrails at 36” above stair nosings. (ADA allows 34” – 38”.) Also, include handrail at 26” in locations used primarily or frequently by children.
      4. OSSC requires that there be handrails within 30” of any portion of a stair that is determined to be an egress route. On stairs that are not part of an egress route, provide intermediate handrail(s) evenly spaced in increments not exceeding 8’.
      5. Provide 12” horizontal handrail extension at the bottom of stairs providing the extension does not protrude into an accessible route.
      6. Provide continuous handrails around the perimeter of landings.
      7. When using steel pipe or tubing, provide minimum wall thickness of .140”.
      8. Round handrails are preferred.
    4. Elevators
      1. Provide hall call buttons that fully illuminate and are bright and are easy to recognize when activated.
      2. Use flat‐surfaced, raised buttons because they are easier to activate than convex buttons.
      3. Hall call buttons shall be located with the down button centered at a height of 35” above the floor. The up button shall not be located more than 43” above the floor (ADA allows a range of 15” to 48”; State Elevator Code allows a range of 35” to 48”)
      4. All car controls and emergency buttons (inside elevator) shall be located so that the lowest button is centered at a height of 35” and the highest buttons is centered at a height of 48” or less. (The State Elevator Code requires all buttons to be located between the height of 35” and 48”.)
      5. In public elevators serving high-use buildings, install two sets of buttons, one with the highest buttons located at 48” and the second set with the lowest buttons located at 33”. The lower set of buttons shall be mounted with the longest dimension horizontal.
        1. The designer, project manager, and Office of Equity and Inclusion, in consultation with AUAC, during the project review process described in Part 2 above, shall determine whether or not a building would be considered “high-use”, on a case-by-case basis.
      6. Provide a handrail on every wall of elevator cabs except those walls that have either doors or elevator controls. The handrails should be located at a height of 32”.
      7. In new construction, provide at least one elevator cab that can accommodate an ambulance stretcher (84” long minimum) In buildings that have an emergency generator, this elevator should be tied into the emergency system.
      8. See Section 14 20 00 for additional elevator requirements.
  5. General Building Elements
    1. General Design
      1. When designing rooms and spaces, include furnishings, trash receptacles, and other moveable objects in the design drawings to make sure these items will not encroach on accessible routes, turning spaces and required clear floor spaces. The design should incorporate space for these items.
    2. Building Ingress and Egress
      1. Where technically feasible, all public access points to a new building or major remodel/renovation should be made accessible.
      2. In those cases where at least 60 percent of all public entrances cannot be made accessible due to technical infeasibility, the Office of Equity and Inclusion will be contacted and review the design prior to a final decision has been determined.
    3. Access to Public Areas
      1. In new construction and major renovation work, all public areas must be made accessible including multi-leveled classrooms, sunken areas, loggias, raised platforms, and mezzanines.
    4. Areas of Refuge
      1. Do not install areas of refuge.
      2. Provide clear means of egress from all areas of a building.
    5. Doors and Door Openers
      1. Provide automatic door operators on all primary entrances to a building.
      2. Install infrared sensors, push button controls, proximity card readers and other door control devices at a height of 36”.
      3. Provide a clear floor space at these door control devices that is level and located outside the swing of the door.
      4. Do not install doors that are narrower than 36” wide. (ADA requires a minimum 32” clear.)
      5. Avoid doors that swing out into corridors or accessible routes of travel.
      6. Install magnetic hold open devices or high quality automatic door openers on internal doors and fire doors in corridors, and other areas accessible entrances and along accessible routes within buildings.
      7. The preferred height for handles, pulls, latches, locks, and other operable parts on accessible doors is 39 inches above the floor.
    6. Windows
      1. Provide adequate clear floor space at any operable window so that a person can approach and open the windows.
    7. Furnishings
      1. Where seating, benches, tables and other furnishings are provided, provide a minimum of one accessible unit for every five units or portion thereof.
  6. Plumbing Elements and Facilities
    1. Restrooms and Toilet Rooms
      1. In new construction and major renovation, all restrooms shall be designed to be fully accessible.
      2. All restrooms shall be designed either without doors or have automatic door operators. (See Section 08 71 00 Door Hardware.)
      3. In addition to the required restrooms per applicable building code requirements, at least one accessible family or assisted use restroom shall be provided. If only one restroom is provided, then it shall be located on the first floor of the building.
      4. All family or assisted use restrooms shall be provided with a Camden entry system. (See Section 08 71 00 Door Hardware.)
      5. In restrooms that include two or more toilets, provide at least one wheelchair accessible stall and one ambulatory accessible stall.
      6. In larger public restrooms containing six or more toilets, provide one wheelchair accessible stall and one ambulatory accessible stall for each six toilet stalls or portion thereof.
      7. Provide 48 inches minimum clearance between stall doors and any wall or obstruction. (ADA allows 42” for latch side approach.)
      8. Install automatic flush valves. Exception: Where dual-flush valves are used, lever controls are acceptable, but must be located in an accessible location.
      9. Install toilets so seat height is at 18” (ADA allows 17” – 19”) and centerline of toilet is 17” from wall (ADA allows 16” – 18”).
      10. Install grab bars at 34” height. (ADA allows 33” – 36”.)
      11. Install vertical grab bar as per ICC A117.1 (new requirement).
    2. Lavatories
      1. In new construction, make all lavatories accessible.
      2. Install automatic faucet controls.
      3. Provide tempered water (120 degrees maximum).
    3. Urinals
      1. Install automatic flush valves.
    4. Showers
      1. Install roll-in showers that are 42” x 60” minimum. (ADA allows 30” x 60”.)
      2. Provide a clear floor space of 36” x 60” minimum outside of transfer shower stalls and 42” x 60” minimum at roll-in shower stalls. (ADA allows 36” x 48” and 30” x 60”, respectively.)
      3. Install shower seats at 18” height. (ADA allows 17” to 19”.)
      4. Install shower controls at 43” (ADA allows 38” to 48”.)
      5. Mount grab bars at 34” (ADA allows 33” to 36”.)
    5. Locker Rooms
      1. Provide accessible lockers on accessible route.
      2. Accessible lockers should be located close to entrance to locker room and near showers.
      3. Accessible lockers should be located within 18” to 43” reach range and be furnished with lever handles.
    6. Toilet Accessories
      1. Mount toilet paper dispensers below grab bars at 29” and out from the front edge of the toilet centered a distance of 8 inches. (ADA allows 7” – 9”.)
      2. Mount toilet seat cover dispenser on opposite wall or partition from side grab bar. The opening should be at a maximum height of 43”.
      3. Mount fixtures (including hand dryers, paper towel holders, and soap dispensers) with controls at 43”. (ADA allows up to 48” or 54” with clear side reach.)
      4. Locate paper towel dispensers and hand dryers in locations that are not within an accessible route of travel. Consider using a recessed unit that does not protrude from the wall more than 4”. (The OSU standard paper towel dispenser protrudes out from the wall approximately 9 inches.)
      5. The same applies to hand dryers.
      6. If provided, install baby changing table so that the front edge is at 34” above the floor.
      7. Mount mirrors with bottom edge no higher than 38” above the floor (ADA allows maximum of 40”.) Provide full height mirrors, where possible.
    7. Drinking Fountains
      1. Install dual-height accessible drinking fountains or water coolers near lecture halls, auditoriums and other high-use areas. (Option: two separate units.)
      2. Provide water bottle fillers on the lower unit.
      3. Provide alcoves for drinking fountains. Wheelchair accessible drinking fountains typically extend out from walls. This creates a potential protrusion hazard.
  7. Communication Elements and features
    1. Parking Signage
      1. See Parking above for accessible parking signage.
    2. Exterior Signage
      1. When all entrances are not accessible, provide signage that directs people to accessible entrances.
    3. Interior Signage
      1. Install tactile signage at stairways and elevators that are not accessible to direct people to the nearest accessible exits.
      2. Tactile exit signage should be provided wherever visual exit signs are required.
      3. Visual and tactile signage indicating the floor level should be provided at all stairwells.
      4. Provide the International Symbol of Accessibility on all restroom signage. (OSSC does not require the International Symbol of Accessibility if all restrooms are accessible.)
      5. Provide Grade 2 Braille on all signage required to have Braille. This is an abbreviated form of Braille.
      6. The base of all raised text and Braille is to be located between a height of 48” and 60” (New ADA requirement).
      7. Where pictograms are used, raised text and Braille should be located below the pictogram.
      8. All doors with automatic door operators should have signage on the door indicating that it is an automatic door. The signage should be on both sides of the door.
    4. Assistive Listening Systems
      1. Where sound systems are installed, assistive listening devices shall be installed as part of the system.
      2. At least 25%, but no fewer than 2 receivers shall be hearing aid compatible.
      3. The assistive listening system shall be as specified in Section 27 40 00 Audio Visual Communications.
  8. Special Rooms, Spaces, and Elements
    1. Classrooms
      1. Design classrooms without ramps or lifts, whenever feasible.
      2. The slope of walking surfaces shall not exceed 1:20.
      3. If elevated stages are provided, they shall be on an accessible route.
      4. Provide minimum 42” clearance between aisles that lead to accessible seating.
      5. Wheelchair accessible spaces should be adjacent to an accessible route.
      6. A clear line of sight to the instructor and media shall be provided at wheelchair accessible spaces.
      7. In classrooms with occupancy of 100 or more, wheelchair and accessible seating should be dispersed to provide a variety of viewing angles.
      8. All accessible spaces and furniture shall be provided with signage indicating that the space is reserved for people with disabilities.
      9. Spaces for wheelchairs should be a minimum of 36” wide by 48” deep (60” deep, if side access).
      10. See draft Oregon State University Classroom & Furniture Accessibility Standards for more specific information about classrooms and furnishings.
    2. Kitchens
      1. Where kitchen ranges or stove tops are installed, provide units with controls located near the front of the units.
      2. At kitchen counters, sink faucet controls shall be located within 20” of the front edge of the counter. Consider side mounted controls located with 16” of the front edge of the counter where feasible.
    3. Cafeterias
      1. The tops of tray slides shall be located at a height of 33” (ADA allows 28” to 34.)
      2. Accessible self-service shelves and dispensing devices shall be located at a maximum height of 33” (ADA allows 15” to 48” or 44” over counters up to 25” deep.)
      3. If dispensing devices are on a counter, the counter should be at a maximum height of 34”.
    4. Research Stations and Laboratories
      1. Provide a minimum of one accessible workstation. Provide one accessible workstation for every twenty workstations or portion thereof.
      2. Accessible work stations should have counters and sinks at 34” maximum height and compliant knee space.
      3. At an accessible work station, locate sink faucet controls along the side of the sink within 16” of the front edge of the counter. The outflow of faucet spigot shall not be located more than 16” from the front edge of the counter.
      4. Provide controls for fans, fume hoods, gas valves, etc. at a maximum height of 43”. (ADA allows 15” to 48” or 44” over counters up to 25” deep)
  9. Recreation Facilities
    1. Fitness and Weight Room
      1. Provide accessible fitness equipment that provides the same range of exercises and strength training provided by the rest of the equipment. Where feasible, provide some equipment that can be used by both able-bodied individuals as well as persons with disabilities.
      2. Provide minimum 42” clearance between all pieces of exercise equipment.
    2. Pools and Spas
      1. Provide at least two accessible means of access into all pools. At least one of these means of access should be either a pool lift or a sloped entry.
      2. Provide at least one accessible means of access into all spas. The accessible means of access should be either a pool lift, transfer wall or transfer system.

Contact Info

Equity and Inclusion
526 Kerr Administration Corvallis, Oregon 97331 Ph: 541-737-3556 Accessibility Email
Copyright ©  2014 Oregon State University
Disclaimer